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Full text of "Tracker July 2009"

July 2009 






Tracker 

Measures of departmental performance 



MoDOT Missouri Department 
of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



Greetings from modot 



The Missouri Department of Transportation is committed to 
being open and transparent. We want you to know what we 
do well, what we don't do so well and what we are doing to 
get better. That is why we created the Tracker. 

This document is your window into MoDOT - warts and all. It 
invites you to hold us accountable for exceeding your expec- 
tations. You expect MoDOT to get the best value out of every 
dollar spent. You expect us to make highways smoother and 
safer, soon. You expect us to fix bad bridges, be responsive 
and to proactively give you the information you need. You 
expect us to provide a world-class transportation experience. 




pete k rahn, director 

Missouri department of 
Transportation 



We share your expectations and have built 18 tangible results 

around them. These results guide us everyday as we go about 

the business of delighting our customers. In the Tracker, you will see that we have 

established measures to gauge our progress and we are comparing ourselves to the 

best organizations in the country. 



You can use the Tracker to see how we are measuring up. We make it available in 
a printed format and on our website at www.modot.org. Missouri's transportation 
system will not improve unless we all work together. The Tracker is one of the many 
ways you can help. Please look it over and let us know how we are doing. 

Sincerely, 




^il^e=3 



Mission 



Our mission is to provide a world-class transportation experience 
that delights our customers and promotes a prosperous Missouri. 



Tangible Results 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 

Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 

Safe Transportation System 

Roadway Visibility 

Personal, Fast Courteous and Understandable Response to Customer Requests (Inbound) 

Partner With Others to Deliver Transportation Services 

Leverage Transportation to Advance Economic Development 

Innovative Transportation Solutions 

Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 

Environmentally Responsible 

Efficient Movement of Goods 

Easily Accessible Modal Choices 

Customer Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making 

Convenient Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 

Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 

Attractive Roadsides 

Advocate for Transportation Issues 

Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive Transportation Information (Outbound) 



Value Statements 



MoDOTwill - 

support and develop employees because we believe they are the key to our success. 

be flexible because we believe one size does not fit all. 

honor our commitments because we believe in integrity. 

encourage risk and accept failure because we believe in getting better. 

be responsive and courteous because we believe in delighting our customers. 

empower employees because we trust them to make timely and innovative decisions. 

not compromise safety because we believe in the well-being of employees and customers. 

provide the best value for every dollar spent because we're taxpayers too. 

value diversity because we believe in the power of our differences. 

be one team because we all share the same mission. 

use teamwork because it produces the best results. 

foster an enjoyable workplace because we care about each other and our mission. 

be open and honest because we must be trustworthy. 

listen and seek to understand because we value everyone's opinion. 

treat everyone with respect because we value their dignity. 

seek out and welcome any idea that increases our options because we don't 

have all the answers. 

always strive to do our job better, faster, and cheaper because we 

want to meet more of Missouri's needs. 



TRACKER Table of Contents 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow - Don Hillis (Page 1) 


Average travel indices and speeds on selected freeway sections 


Troy Pinkerton 


la 


Average rate of travel on selected signalized routes 


J ulie Stotlemeyer 


lb 


Average time to clear traffic incident 


Rick Bennett 


lc 


Average time to clear traffic backup from incident 


Rick Bennett 


Id 


Number of customers assisted by the Motorist Assist program 


Rick Bennett 


le 


Percent of Motorist Assist customers who are satisfied with the service 


Rick Bennett 


If 


Percent of work zones meeting expectations for traffic flow 


Dan Smith 


lg 


Time to meet winter storm event performance objectives on major and minor highways 


Tim Jackson 


lh 


Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges - Kevin Keith (Page 2) 


Projects that contribute to the Better Roads, Brighter Future program goal 


Jay Bledsoe 


2a 


Percent of major highways that are in good condition 


Jay Bledsoe 


2b 


Percent of minor highways that are in good condition 


Jay Bledsoe 


2c 


Percent of vehicle miles traveled on major highways in good condition 


Jay Bledsoe 


2d 


Percent of deficient bridges on major highways 


Dennis Heckman 


2e 


Percent of deficient bridges on minor highways 


Dennis Heckman 


2f 


Number of deficient bridges on the state system (major & minor highways) 


Dennis Heckman 


2g 


Safe Transportation System - Don Hillis (Page 3) 


Number of fatalities and disabling injuries 


Leanna Depue 


3a 


Number of impaired driver-related fatalities and disabling injuries 


Leanna Depue 


3b 


Rate of annual fatalities and disabling injuries 


Leanna Depue 


3c 


Percent of safety belt/ passenger vehicle restraint use 


Leanna Depue 


3d 


Number of bicycle and pedestrian fatalities and disabling injuries 


Leanna Depue 


3e 


Number of motorcycle fatalities and disabling injuries 


Leanna Depue 


3f 


Number of commercial motor vehicle crashes resulting in fatalities 


Mark Biesemeyer 


3g 


Number of commercial motor vehicle crashes resulting in injuries 


Mark Biesemeyer 


3h 


Number of fatalities and injuries in work zones 


Troy Pinkerton 


3i 


Number of highway-rail crossing fatalities and collisions 


Rod Massman 


3j 


Roadway Visibility - Don Hillis (Page 4) 


Rate of nighttime crashes 


Mike Curtit 


4a 


Percent of signs that meet customers' expectations 


Mike Curtit 


4b 


Percent of stripes that meet customers' expectations 


J im Brocksmith 


4c 


Percent of work zones meeting expectations for visibility 


Dan Smith 


4d 


Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response 
to Customer Requests (Inbound) - Shane Peck (Page 5) 


Percent of overall customer satisfaction 


Sally Oxenhandler 


5a 


Percent of customers who contacted MoDOT that felt they were responded to quickly and 
courteously with an understandable response 


Sally Oxenhandler 


5b 


Percent of documented customer requests responded to within 24 hours 


Sally Oxenhandler 


5c 


Average completion time on requests requiring follow up 


Sally Oxenhandler 


5d 


Partner With Others to Deliver Transportation Services - Kevin Keith (Page 6) 


Number of dollars of discretionary funds allocated to Missouri 


Todd Grosvenor 


6a 


Percent of earmarked dollars that represent MoDOT's high priority highway projects 


Todd Grosvenor 


6b 


Number of dollars generated through cost-sharing and other partnering agreements 


Todd Grosvenor 


6c 


Leverage Transportation to Advance Economic Development - Roberta Broeker (Page 7) 


Number of miles of new 4-lane corridors completed 


Jay Bledsoe 


7a 


Percent utilization of SI B & STAR loan programs 


Brenda Morris 


7b 


Economic return from transportation investment 


Ben Reeser 


7c 


Innovative Transportation Solutions - Mara Campbell (Page 8) 


Number and percent of research recommendations implemented 


Bill Stone 


8a 


Number of external awards received 


Bill Stone 


8b 


Percent of best practices by implementation status 


Bill Stone 


8c 


Number of dollars saved by increasing MoDOT's productivity 


Jen Harper 


8d 



TRACKER Table of Contents 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value - Dave Nichols (Page 9) 


Percent of programmed project cost as compared to final project cost 


Renate Wilkinson 


9a 


Average number of years it takes to go from the programmed commitment in the Statewide 
Transportation Improvement Program to construction completion 


Machelle Watkins 


9b 


Percent of projects completed within programmed amount 


Dave Ahlvers 


9c 


Percent of projects completed on time 


Dave Ahlvers 


9d 


Percent of change for finalized contracts 


Dave Ahlvers 


9e 


Average construction cost per day by contract type 


Dave Ahlvers 


9f 


Unit cost of construction expenditures 


Kenneth Voss 


9g 


Annual dollar amount saved by implementing value engineering 


Joe Jones 


9h 


Percent of customers who feel completed projects are the right transportation solutions 


Kathy Harvey 


9i 


Environmentally Responsible - Dave Nichols (Page 10) 


Percent of projects completed without environmental violation 


Kathy Harvey 


10a 


Number of projects MoDOT protects sensitive species or restores habitat 


Gayle Unruh 


10b 


Ratio of acres of wetlands created compared to the number of acres of wetlands impacted 


Gayle Unruh 


10c 


Percent of Missouri's clean air days 


Eric Curtit 


lOd 


Number of gallons of fuel consumed 


Jeannie Wilson 


lOe 


Number of historic resources avoided or protected as compared to those mitigated 


Bob Reeder 


lOf 


Number of tons of recycled/waste materials used in construction projects 


Dave Ahlvers 


lOg 


Efficient Movement of Goods - Brian Weiler (Page 11 




Freight tonnage by mode 


Ernie Perry 


11a 


Percent of trucks using advanced technology at Missouri weigh stations 


Barb Hague 


lib 


Interstate motor carrier mileage 


Joy Prenger 


lie 


Percent of satisfied motor carriers 


DeAnne Rickabaugh 


lid 


Customer satisfaction with timeliness of Motor Carrier Services' response 


DeAnne Rickabaugh 


lie 


Easily Accessible Modal Choices - Brian Weiler (Page 12) 


Number of airline passengers 


J oe Pestka 


12a 


Number of daily scheduled airline flights 


J oe Pestka 


12b 


Number of business-capable airports 


J oe Pestka 


12c 


Number of transit passengers 


Steve Billings 


12d 


Average number of days per week rural transit service is available 


Steve Billings 


12e 


Number of intercity bus stops 


Steve Billings 


12f 


Number of rail passengers 


Rod Massman 


12g 


Number of passengers and vehicles transported by ferryboat 


Sherrie Turley 


12h 


State funding for multimodal programs 


Lisa Hueste 


12i 


Percent of customers satisfied with transportation options 


Eric Curtit 


12j 


Customer Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making - Dave Nichols (Page 13) 


Number of customers who attend transportation-related meetings 


Bob Brendel 


13a 


Percent of customers who are satisfied with feedback they receive from MoDOT after offering 
comments 


Bob Brendel 


13b 


MoDOT takes into consideration customers' needs and views in transportation decision-making 


Sue Cox 


13c 


Percent of positive feedback responses received from planning partners regarding involvement 
in transportation decision-making 


Sue Cox 


13d 


Convenient, Clean & Safe Roadside Accommodations - Don Hillis (Page 14) 


Percent of customers satisfied with rest areas' convenience, cleanliness and safety 


J im Carney 


14a 


Percent of customers satisfied with commuter lots' convenience, cleanliness and safety 


Tim Chojnacki 


14b 


Number of users of commuter parking lots 


Tim Chojnacki 


14c 


Number of users of rest areas 


Stacy Armstrong 


14d 


Number of truck customers that utilize rest areas 


Tim Jackson 


14e 



TRACKER Table of Contents 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent - Roberta Broeker (Page 15) 


Ratio of lane miles per full-time equivalency 


Steve Meystrik 


15a 


Number of full-time equivalencies 


Steve Meystrik 


15b 


Percent of work capacity based on average hours worked 


Micki Knudsen 


15c 


Rate of employee turnover 


Kim Hickey 


15d 


Level of job satisfaction 


Paul Imhoff 


15e 


Number of lost workdays per year 


J eff Padgett 


15f 


Rate and total of OSHA recordable incidents 


J eff Padgett 


15g 


Number of claims for general liability 


J eff Padgett 


15h 


Cost and usage of utilities for facilities 


Doug Record 


15i 


Fleet status 


Jeannie Wilson 


15J 


Percent of vendor invoices paid on time 


Debbie Rickard 


15k 


Distribution of expenditures 


Debbie Rickard 


151 


Percent variance of state revenue projections 


Ben Reeser 


15m 


MoDOT national ranking in revenue per mile 


Ben Reeser 


15n 


Number of excess properties conveyed 


Kelly Lucas 


15o 


Gross revenue generated from excess properties sold 


Kelly Lucas 


15p 


Attractive Roadsides - Don Hillis (Page 16) 


Percent of roadsides that meet customers' expectations 


Mike Shea 


16a 


Number of miles in Adopt- A- Highway program 


Stacy Armstrong 


16b 


Advocate for Transportation Issues - Pete Rahn (Page 17) 


Percent of minorities and females employed 


David Williams 


17a 


Separation rates for females and minorities 


David Williams 


17b 


Transportation-related legislation filed and passed by the General Assembly 


Lisa Lemaster 


17c 


Number of federal earmarked projects on the state's transportation system 


Jay Wunderlich 


17d 


Percent of customers who view MoDOT as Missouri's transportation expert 


Jay Wunderlich 


17e 


Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
Transportation Information (Outbound) - Shane Peck (Pag 


el8) 


Number of public appearances 


Sally Oxenhandler 


18a 


Percent of customers who feel MoDOT provides timely, accurate and understandable information 


Sally Oxenhandler 


18b 


Number of contacts initiated by MoDOT to media 


Kristi Jamison 


18c 


Percent of MoDOT information that meets the media's expectations 


Kristi Jamison 


18d 


Percent of positive newspaper editorials 


Kristi Jamison 


18e 


Number of repeat visitors to MoDOT's web site 


Matt Hiebert 


18f 


American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Dave Nichols (Page 19) 


Recovery Act projects and dollars awarded to date 


Jay Bestgen 


19a 


Percent of Recovery Act project dollars obligated to date 


Jay Bestgen 


19b 


Recovery Act project dollars awarded versus budget 


Jay Bestgen 


19c 


Recovery Act direct jobs created 


Travis Koestner 


19d 


Percent of Recovery Act Multimodal project dollars obligated to date 


J oe Pestka 


19e 




Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 

Tangible Result Driver - Don Hill is, Director of System Management 



Missouri drivers expect to get to their destinations on time, without delays. Traffic, 
changes in weather, work zones and highway incidents can all impact their travel. 
MoDOT works to ensure that motorists travel as efficiently as possible on the state sys- 
tem by better managing work zones, snow removal and highway incidents, and by using 
the latest technology to inform motorists of possible delays and available options. Bet- 
ter traffic flow means fewer crashes. 





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Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Average travel indices and speeds on selected freeway sections- la 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Troy Pinkerton, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the average travel index values 
and average speeds on various freeway sections. The 
desired trend is for the travel index to remain at or 
near a value of 1.00. A value of 1.00 is representative 
of a free-flow condition. The travel index is directly 
related to the average speed and represents the level 
of congestion by taking into consideration not only 
average speed but also the traffic volumes. The travel 
index is calculated according to the following 
equation: 

Travel Index = Average speed/Freeflow speed 

Average speeds are taken from sensor data. The free- 
flow speed is constant and is equal to the highest 
hourly average speed for any hour in that data set. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data from the St. Louis and Kansas City regions are 
provided by MoDOT's traffic management centers. 
Information about the St. Louis traffic management 
center, Gateway Guide, can be found at 
http://www.gatewayguide.com and information about 
the traffic management center in Kansas City, KC 
Scout, can be found at http://www.kcscout.net/ . Data 
for the St. Louis region is also provided through a 
partnership with Trqffic.com. Data for each location 
is updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

Kansas City metropolitan region: 
As shown on the graph, the freeway systems in the 
Kansas City region continue to perform in the mid- 80 
to 90-percentile range during the peak hours, as 
compared to the free-flow condition. The morning 
peak rose to its highest value of 0.90 in this fourth 
fiscal quarter. The evening peak dropped to a value 
of 0.85. Most of the Kansas City region has been 
free from significant work zone impacts. 
Construction associated with the Paseo Bridge 
continues to contribute to some slow downs in the 
morning commute southbound into downtown. This 
area should see some dramatic slow downs over the 
next few years due to the KC ICON bridge 
replacement project. Additional information on the 
construction activities along 1-29/35 can be found at 
www.kcicon.org . 



St. Louis metropolitan region: 
As shown on the graph, the freeway systems in the 
St. Louis region are performing in the upper- 80 
percentile range in the morning peak and the mid-70 
percentile range in the evening peak. The morning 
peak travel index decreased from 0.90 to 0.88. The 
evening peak travel index decreased from 0.81 to 
0.75 for the fourth quarter fiscal year 2009. The 
sensor located west of Madison Avenue on 1-70 was 
not operational during the month of May. The 
district had some issues with getting the site repaired 
in June, but expect it to be reporting good data again 
in July. There was a significant increase in the 
amount of incidents (crashes, work zones, and special 
events), especially Level 3 (more than 2 hours) 
incidents. While these incidents are spread out over 
the entire route, and not centralized to the sensor 
where readings are collected, it could be considered a 
potential reasoning for the decrease in travel index 
for the fourth quarter. Another indicator that this 
decrease in travel index may be incident related, is 
that there has not been any significant increase in 
traffic volumes anywhere on the interstate system for 
the fourth quarter versus the third quarter. The only 
segment that showed an upward trend over the past 
quarter was eastbound 1-44 between Laclede Station 
Road and 1-55, which is not near the 1-44 sensor used 
for this report (1-44 @ Soccer Park). The closure of a 
portion of 1-64 continues to be the main regional 
impact to traffic. Additional information on the 
construction activities along 1-64 can be found at 
www.thenewi64.org . 

Statewide: 

The statewide average speed on rural routes 
continues to perform efficiently, recorded at 69.67 
miles per hour for this quarter, which is a slight 
increase from last quarter. Expect several resurfacing 
projects on rural interstates this upcoming 
construction season funded both from traditional 
sources as well as from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act. A list project activities can be 
found at www.modot.org . 



1A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Travel Index on Selected Freeway Sections 

Kansas City Metropolitan Averages 




A.M. Peak 



P.M. Peak 



Hours 



□ Average FY 2008 

□ lstQtrFY2009 

□ 2nd Qtr FY 2009 

□ 3rdQtrFY2009 
■ 4th Qtr FY 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 




HI] 



Travel Index on Selected Freeway Sections 
St. Louis Metro Averages 




A.M. Peak 



P.M. Peak 



Hours 



□ Average FY 2008 

□ 1st Qtr FY 2009 

□ 2nd Qtr FY 2009 

□ 3rd Qtr FY 2009 
■ 4th Qtr FY 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 




ill 



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July 2009 



1A(2) 



Uninterrupted Traf 



Average Travel Speeds on Selected Roadway 

Sections 
Statewide Rural Routes 



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70.00 
60.00 
50.00 
40.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
0.00 



68.04 



69.67 



Statewide Average Speed 



DAverageFY2008 

□ IstQtr. FY 2009 

□ 2ndQtr. FY 2009 
D3rdQtr. FY 2009 
■4th Qtr. FY 2009 

Average 

Speed Limit 

on 

Rural 

Routes: 

70mph 





Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Average rate of travel on selected signalized routes- lb 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Julie Stotlemeyer, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure indicates how well selected arterials 
across the state are operating during peak traffic 
times. As improvements are made, such as signal 
timing or access management, this measure will show 
the effects of those efforts and decisions on the 
arterial system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Travel times are measured on various arterials. Data 
is collected from driving each route twice during a.m. 
and p.m. peak times and timing how long it takes to 
traverse the route. The travel time is compared to the 
speed limit and the travel time factor determined. As 
the travel time factor approaches 1.00, traffic is 
moving at the speed limit. Data collection began in 
the second quarter of fiscal year 2007. Data for this 
measure is updated quarterly. 



Improvement Status: 

For fourth quarter fiscal year 2009, the average 
statewide travel time factor for a.m. peak is 0.781 and 
p.m. peak is 0.681. Overall performance is 0.731. 
The a.m. peak travel time factor is 10 percent higher 
than p.m. peak travel time factor. Fourth quarter data 
shows the a.m. and p.m. peak for arterials operating 
higher than the average for fiscal year 2007 and 
2008. For fourth quarter fiscal year 2009, the a.m. 
peak travel time factor is four-tenths of a percent 
lower than the fourth quarter fiscal year 2008 a.m. 
peak travel time factor and the p.m. peak travel time 
factor is approximately one percent higher than the 
fourth quarter fiscal year 2008 p.m. peak travel time 
factor. 

The average rate of travel on selected signalized 
routes has changed due to variations in traffic flow, 
construction and installation of a traffic adaptive 
system. 



Average Rate of Travel on Selected Signalized Routes 



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0.701 



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0.762 



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AM 



PM 



Peak Hour 




□ Average FY 2007 

□ Average FY 2008 

■ IstQTR. FY 2009 

□ 2nd QTR. FY 2009 

■ 3rd QTR. FY 2009 

■ 4th QTR. FY 2009 



: The average FY 2007 data is from the last three quarters in FY 2007. The 1 st quarter FY 2007 is unavailable. 



July 2009 



IB 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Average time to clear traffic incident- lc 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Rick Bennett, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure is used to determine the trends in 
incident clearance on the state highway system. A 
traffic incident is an unplanned event that creates a 
temporary reduction in the number of vehicles that 
can travel on the road. The sooner an incident is 
removed, the sooner the highway system returns to 
normal capacity. Therefore, responding to and 
quickly addressing the incidents (crashes, flat tires 
and stalled vehicles) improves system performance. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Advanced Transportation Management Systems 
(ATMS) are used by both the Kansas City and St. 
Louis traffic management centers to record "incident 
start time" and the time for "all lanes cleared." In 
October of 2008, St. Louis switched from using 
motorist assist arrival times as the "incident start 
time" to utilizing the time the incident was confirmed 
in the ATMS usually via CCTV, prior to any 
responder arriving on the scene, as the "incident start 



time." Average time to clear traffic incidents is 
calculated from these times. In January of 2009, 
about 20 additional miles of 1-70, 1-470, and 1-435 
were added and became operational in the Kansas 
City urban area 

Improvement Status: 

St. Louis recorded 509, 548, and 571 incidents 
respectively for the months of April, May, and June 
utilizing ATMS. St. Louis' data includes 
considerably more incidents because St. Louis 
monitors more freeway miles than the Kansas City 
area. 

Kansas City collected data on 190, 212, and 225 
incidents respectively for the months of April, May 
and June. In June, there were five long-term 
incidents (greater than 2 hours) that averaged 307 
minutes to clear. 




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Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



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Average Time to Clear Traffic Incident 

St. Louis 

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Average Time to Clear Traffic Incident 
Kansas City 



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July 2009 



1C(2) 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Average time to clear traffic backup from incident- Id 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Rick Bennett, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the amount of time it takes to 
return traffic flow back to normal after a traffic 
incident. A traffic incident is any unplanned event 
that creates a temporary reduction in the number of 
vehicles that can travel on the road. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

"All lanes cleared" and "clear backup" times are 
being recorded by MoDOT's Traffic Management 
Centers in Kansas City and St. Louis. Average times 
to clear traffic backups are calculated from these 
recorded times. Kansas City reports capture when a 
backup is relieved as an automated process. The 
Kansas City area has devices to collect data along 
portions of interstates 435 and 70. In October 2008, 
St. Louis began using advanced transportation 
management system (ATMS) devices to collect data. 
The number of incidents that data is collected on in 
St. Louis has gone from approximately 50 to 500. 

Improvement Status: 

St. Louis area routes have larger traffic volumes that 
create more significant congestion problems than in 
Kansas City. 

St. Louis' times to clear traffic backup continue to 
show a marked decrease from previous years. This is 
due to the increase in the number of incidents for 
which data is being reported. Prior to October 2008, 
the only incidents for which data was available were 
those incidents the TMC could monitor by camera. 



As a result of the increase in data collected due to the 
improvements to the ATMS system, St. Louis shows 
a much lower average time to clear traffic backup. 

Kansas City continues to have fairly consistent times 
to clear backup from an incident. In April, May, and 
June, 60 percent of Kansas City's incidents were 
within rush hour time frames, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. or 3 
p.m. to 7 p.m., causing congestion to take a little 
longer to return back to even rush hour conditions. 

Renewed efforts in developing long-term 
partnerships with local agencies and law enforcement 
have increased the awareness of MoDOT's 
expectations for quick clearance and open roadways. 




Id 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Average Time to Clear Traffic Backup From Incident 

St. Louis 



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14.6 
















12.4 








9.8 


n 


D 


_n_ 


El 


H 






1 1 i*^B 








6.1 


7.4 


i i 

5.3 



=12009 

□ 2008 

■^2007 



f «*' J? / ^ if J ^ </ a* ^' 



* 



-& 



P* 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Calendar Month 



Average Time to Clear Traffic Backup From Incident 

Kansas City 





30 
25 
20 
15 
10 
5 
n 












3 

C 




H 


11.3 io.: 

rn ia; 


2 9 A 


9.5 1 T2 


9.9 
.^*i_!2i2- 


11/) 


11.0 


9.8 

□ 


9.2 10.0 

n C D 








9.0 




i m 


> 10.8 9.8 


10.0 8.™ 


9.P 


















6.4 


ti *r 



^2009 



□ 2008 

-±- 2007 



•? >? f f ^ ^ * & f <? S o* 



Calendar Month 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



Id (2) 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Number of customers assisted by the Motorist Assist program- le 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Rick Bennett, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure is used to gauge the use of the Motorist 
Assist programs on our state roadways, because 
traffic incidents impact Missouri's transportation 
system capacity. An incident is any unplanned event 
that creates a temporary reduction in roadway 
capacity that impedes normal traffic flow. The 
sooner an incident is removed, the sooner the 
highway system returns to normal capacity. 
Therefore, responding to and quickly addressing the 
incidents (crashes, flat tires and stalled vehicles) 
improves system performance. MoDOT's Motorist 
Assist operators are able to respond to nearly every 
incident, major or minor, in the areas they cover. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The Motorist Assist operators record each assist and 
then prepare a monthly summary. Kansas City 
operators patrol approximately 105 freeway miles. In 
October 2008, St. Louis added a 22-mile section of I- 
55 to their patrol route, which brings the total 



freeway miles St. Louis operators patrol to 
approximately 192. 

In January 2008, MoDOT partnered with St. Louis 
County to develop the Interstate 64 Traffic Response 
Service Patrol to ease congestion created by the 
reconstruction on the 1-64 corridor. The 1-64 Traffic 
Response Service Patrol provides similar services to 
motorists as the MoDOT Motorist Assist program on 
the arterials impacted by the closure of 1-64. The 1-64 
Traffic Response Service Patrol records each assist 
and prepares a monthly report. 

Improvement Status: 

In June 2009, the Kansas City Motorist Assist 
program provided the highest number of assists in a 
single month, 2113, in the history of the program. 
This data demonstrates that the Motorist Assist 
program in both St. Louis and Kansas City continue 
to provide a valuable service to motorists on the 
urban freeways in both metropolitan areas. 




i 



EMERGENCY HELP 

HIGHWAY PATROL 

1-800-525-5555 

or CELLULAR * 55 



Motorist Assist Route 

5:00 A.M. -7:30 P.M. 





Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Number of Customers Assisted by 

the Motorist Assist Program 

St. Louis 



6,000 
5,000 



5 4 ' 000 



2,000 

1,000 





4,948 



4,649 "'"" 4,742 

3,561 3,498 4,028 3£3 ^ A ^99 A *£* ^ *g* 

-\ m. m.mm 1 A ' A I 



333? 
E 3,000 I ■ B 




<<^ 



^' «* jP *? ^ v ^" * 



? .^ ^ 



.* o* ^' <f°' 



Calendar Month 



12009 

A 2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 




-> 



60,000 

50,000 

- 40,000 

<D 

A 

£ 30,000 

Z 20,000 

10,000 





Number of Customers Assisted by 

the Motorist Assist Program 

St. Louis 



47,745 49,594 








12,481 






41,141 


11,251 






11,398 








12,182 


14,089 




10,867 








25,385 




12,135 


12,610 




13,356 






10,651 








12,177 


12,029 






10,414 





2006 



2007 2008 

Year 



a 4th Qtr 

□ 3rdQtr 

□ 2nd Qtr 
■ 1st Qtr 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 




JULY 2009 



IE (2) 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Number of Customers Assisted by 

the Motorist Assist Program 

Kansas City 




1,283 1.32 4 ], 257 

A A ^ , 



1,071 



-934- 



1,112 



A A ^ 



<? 









CV® .«* 



^' ^ r^' ^' ^' 



•&< 



cF ^ 



Calendar Month 



12009 

A 2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 




20,000 

15,000 
O 

E 10,000 

3 

z 

5,000 



Number of Customers Assisted by 

the Motorist Assist Program 

Kansas City 



2006 



2007 



2008 



Year 



2009 



14,287 




12,445 




3,289 




13,021 






3,258 






3,114 


9,233 


3,207 
3,923 


3,216 






3,864 




4,970 




3,296 


3,175 








B 









> 




D 4th Qtr 




■ 3rdQtr 




D 2nd Qtr 




■ 1st Qtr 




DESIRED 


TREND 


^ 


, 



IE (3) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Number of Customers Assisted by 

1-64 Traffic Response Service Patrol 

St. Louis 



2,000 
1,600 



© 1,200 



800 



400 



1,256 A, 
A 1.046 



1 . 435 1415 i a57 1>371 M 3 



1,534 



1,484 



AAA 



A A 1 - 317 
A A 1 - 134 

985- 




^ «* 'jf / ^ ^ ^ ^ • d* ^ ^ 



* 



Calendar Month 



ZZI2009 
A 2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



(^ 




JULY 2009 



IE (4) 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Percent of Motorist Assist customers who are satisfied with the 
service- If 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Rick Bennett, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure helps evaluate services provided 
through MoDOT's Motorist Assist Program, 
specifically, whether the customers who use the 
program are satisfied with the service. Information 
received provides direction on how to better serve 
our customers and keep traffic moving safely and 
efficiently. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Motorist Assist operators distribute survey cards to 
customers. Data from the cards is compiled and 
tabulated by Heartland Market Research, LLC. 
Surveys with selections identifying that the service 
was "probably" or "definitely" valuable were 
tabulated as "satisfied" for this measure. 

In January 2008, MoDOT partnered with St. Louis 
County to develop the Interstate 64 Traffic Response 
Service Patrol to ease congestion created by the 
reconstruction on the 1-64 corridor. The 1-64 Traffic 
Response Service Patrol provides similar services to 
motorists as the MoDOT Motorist Assist program, 
however, it patrols the arterials impacted by the 
closure of 1-64. The 1-64 Traffic Response Service 
Patrol distributes a separate but similar survey card to 
its customers. 




Improvement Status: 

This data agrees with information provided by 
customers on prior comment forms - almost all 
customers are satisfied. 



Second Quarter 2008, 

• 1,117 Motorist Assist surveys 
received 

• 323 1-64 Traffic Response surveys 
received 

Third Quarter 2008, 

• 1,410 Motorist Assist surveys 
received 

• 228 1-64 Traffic Response surveys 
received 

Fourth Quarter 2008, 

• 1,366 Motorist Assist surveys 
received 

• 142 1-64 Traffic Response surveys 
received 

First Quarter 2009, 

• 1,413 Motorist Assist surveys 
received 

• 126 1-64 Traffic Response surveys 
received 

Second Quarter 2009, 

• 1,504 Motorist Assist surveys 
received 

• 124 1-64 Traffic Response surveys 
received 



IF 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Percent of Motorist Assist Customers Who Are 
Satisfied With the Service 



100 





2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



Percent of 1-64 Traffic Response Service Patrol 
Customers Who Are Satisfied With the Service 




2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



July 2009 



If (2) 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Percent of work zones meeting expectations for traffic flow-1 g 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 

Measurement Driver: Dan Smith, Traffic Management & Operations Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

An important factor in evaluating the department' s 
performance in temporary traffic control design, 
deployment, operation and maintenance is the 
measurement of work zones' affect on the mobility of 
highway users. This measure tracks how well the 
department meets customer expectations of traffic 
flow in, around and through work zones on state 
highways. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

On January 1, 2009, MoDOT provided a Work Zone 
Customer Survey for the traveling public to provide 
evaluation of the mobility in work zones across the 
state. Each survey has several questions that address 
the sign and flagger instructions, speed limit, travel 
time, and travel safety. The evaluator assigns a yes, 
no, or n/a rating to each of the questions. The overall 
ratings are compiled quarterly and reported via this 



measurement. The survey is on the MoDOT website 
at the following address: 
http://www.modot.gov/workzones/Comments.htm . 

Improvement Status: 

Compilation of the 1,294 surveys completed by the 
traveling public and MoDOT staff between January 
and June of this calendar year resulted in an increase 
of positive satisfaction rating from 88 to 91 percent 
for work zone traffic flow. Since this is the first year 
the traveling public has had an opportunity to provide 
formal feedback on work zones, no historical data is 
available. For comparison purposes, the 2008 yearly 
average results of our technical staff inspections are 
included. The revised evaluation technique will 
allow MoDOT to align our priorities with that of our 
customers. 



Percent of Work Zones Meeting Expectations for Traffic Flow 




2008 Average 



1st Quarter 2009 
Calendar Year 



2nd Quarter 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



1G 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Uninterrupted Traffic Flow 



Time to meet winter storm event performance objectives on major 
and minor highways- Ih 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Tim Jackson, Maintenance Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the amount of time needed to 
perform MoDOT's snow and ice removal efforts. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This data is collected in the winter event database. 
This measurement tracks the actual time involved in 
this process so improvements can be made. After 
each winter event, such as a snow or ice storm, area 
maintenance personnel submit a report indicating 
how much time it took to clear snow from the major 
and minor highways. After a storm ends, the 
objectives are to restore the major highways to a clear 
condition as soon as possible and have the lower- 
volume minor highways open to two-way traffic and 
treated with salt and/or abrasives at critical areas such 
as intersections, hills and curves as soon as possible. 
The end of the storm is defined as when freezing 
precipitation stops accumulating on the roadways, 
either from falling or drifting conditions. Data 



collection for this measure runs from November 
through March of each winter season, and is updated 
in the January and April Tracker reports. The time in 
hours is the statewide average for the entire winter 
season. 

Improvement Status: 

The average time to meet the performance objectives 
on the major highways was 0.8 hour less than the 
previous winter. The average time to meet the 
performance objectives on the minor highways was 
the same as last winter. The time to meet the 
performance objectives will vary based on the 
amount of snow received, the duration and the 
intensity of the storm. Strategies to improve these 
numbers include implementing best practices, 
pursuing equipment enhancements, testing new 
materials and continued training of snow removal 
employees. 



Time to Meet Winter Storm Event Performance 
Objectives on Major and Minor Highways 



10 



52 
O 



8.4 



2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 

Winter Season 



4.8 



~H 



I Major 
Highways 

Minor 
Highways 



2008-09 



July 2009 



Ih 



pgCTW 






;j£^r F* J** 




Smooth and Unrestricted 
roads and bridges 

Tangible Result Driver - Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 



MoDOT's customers have said they want smooth roads. Smoother roads mean less wear 
on vehicles, safer travel and greater opportunity for economic development. MoDOT 
will delight its customers by providing smooth and unrestricted roads and bridges. 
MoDOT recognizes that road projects built and maintained to a high standard of 
smoothness will be more efficient. MoDOT must provide customers with smooth roads - 
because everyone riding on a road can feel whether it is smooth or not! 



^fr^ 






Tracker 

MEASURES OF DEPARTMENTAL PERFORMANCE 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Projects that contribute to the Better Roads, 
Brighter Future program goal-2a 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Jay Bledsoe, Transportation System Analysis Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annually the miles of major 
highways in good condition compared to that 
required to reach the goal of 85 percent in good 
condition by the end of 201 1 and the miles 
programmed in the Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP) that contribute to this 
goal. In addition to the pavement goals, MoDOT has 
made improvements to the overall safety and 
appearance of these routes a priority. Therefore, in 
addition to pavement condition, this measure tracks 
miles of major highways that have a minimum 4-foot 
paved shoulder, an edge-line rumble stripe and a 
centerline rumble stripe where appropriate. 

The Better Roads, Brighter Future (BRBF) program 
follows the 2005 completion of the Smooth Roads 
Initiative (SRI). BRBF will result in 85 percent of 
these major highways in good condition by the end of 
2011. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The major highway system is defined as all routes 
functionally classified as principal arterials. By 
definition, the principal arterial system provides for 
statewide or interstate movement of traffic. 
Examples include the Interstate System and most 
U.S. routes such as 63, 54 or 36. 

In urban areas, principal arterials carry traffic 
entering or leaving the urban area and serve 
movement of vehicles between central business 
districts and suburban residential areas. Examples 
include Business 50 (Missouri Blvd.) in Jefferson 
City, MO 740 (Stadium Blvd.) in Columbia and 
Route D (Page Ave.) in St. Louis. 

The major roads in Missouri total approximately 
5,573 centerline miles. This revised figure reflects 
additional mileage based on statewide review of the 
highway system. Good condition is defined using a 



combination of criteria. On high-speed routes (speed 
limits greater than 50 mph), the International 
Roughness Index (IRI) is used. For lower-speed 
routes (mostly urban areas) where smoothness is less 
critical, a Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) is used. 
While smoothness is a factor in PSR, physical 
condition is also a factor. 

The overall progress and programmed work will be 
reported annually. Semi-annual updates of miles 
opened to traffic will be reported. 

Improvement Status: 

Completion of SRI resulted in a significant 
improvement in pavement condition. At the 
beginning of BRBF (January 2007), 74 percent of 
major highways were in good condition (as shown in 
2b: Percent of major highways that are in good 
condition). By January 2009, more than 83 percent 
of major highways were in good condition. 

Through the BRBF program, MoDOT will emphasize 
maintenance of the miles improved through SRI 
while making major improvements to the remainder 
of the 5,573 miles in the major highway system. By 
the end of 201 1, a total of 85 percent of the major 
highways will have improved surfaces along with 
new or improved shoulders and rumble stripes. 
However, all 5,573 miles will benefit from safety 
features such as wider striping and brighter signing. 
There are currently more than 180 BRBF projects in 
the 2009-2013 STIP that will address more than 
1,700 major highway miles. 

Funding for the BRBF program will come from 
existing Taking Care of System funds in accordance 
with the current funding allocation directed by the 
Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission. 
More than $430 million per year is dedicated to 
taking care of the existing highway system. 



2a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Projects That Contribute to the Better Roads, 

Brighter Future Program Goal 

Lane Miles Meeting Desired Condition 

16,000 



<D 

c 12,000 



10,000 




Jan. 1,2007 Jan. 1,2008 

Year 



□ Lane Miles 
Remaining 

■ Lane Miles 
Currently Good 



DESIRED 
TREND 




Projects That Contribute to the Better Roads, 
Brighter Future Program Goal 
Programmed Lane Miles 



2,000 
| | 1-500 

O I h00 ° 
5 2 500 

a. 




2009 



2010 2011 

STIP Year 



2012 



DESIRED 
TREND 




Projects That Contribute to the Better Roads, 
Brighter Future Program Goal 



Completed Miles with Safety Features 




(n Miles 
Remaining 

Completed 
Miles 



Paved Edgeline Centerline 

Shoulder Rumble Stripe Rumble Stripe 

Safety Features 



DESIRED 
TREND 




JULY 2009 



2a(2) 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Percent of major highways that are in good condition-2b 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Jay Bledsoe, Transportation System Analysis Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the condition of Missouri's 
major highway road surfaces. The public has 
indicated the condition of Missouri's existing state 
roadway system should be one of the state's highest 
priorities. MoDOT places a high priority on 
improving the condition of state highways. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The major highway system is defined as all routes 
functionally classified as principal arterials. By 
definition, the principal arterial system provides for 
statewide or interstate movement of traffic. 
Examples include the Interstate System and most 
U.S. routes such as 63, 54 or 36. 

In urban areas, principal arterials carry traffic 
entering or leaving the urban area and serve 
movement of vehicles between central business 
districts and suburban residential areas. Examples 
include Business 50 (Missouri Blvd.) in Jefferson 
City, MO 740 (Stadium Blvd.) in Columbia and 
Route D (Page Ave.) in St. Louis. 

The major roads in Missouri total approximately 
5,573 centerline miles. This figure reflects mileage 
based on statewide review of the highway system. 
Good condition is defined using a combination of 
criteria. On high-speed routes (speed limits greater 
than 50 mph), the International Roughness Index 
(IRI) is used. For lower-speed routes (mostly urban 
areas) where smoothness is less critical, a Present 
Serviceability Rating (PSR) is used. While 
smoothness is a factor in PSR, physical condition is 
also a factor. 

Direct comparison to other states is difficult because 
of differences in measurement methodologies. 
However, a general order-of-magnitude comparison 
is possible given certain assumptions. For example, 
there are five states that report mileage for major 
highways within 10 percent of that maintained by 
MoDOT. Of these five, Georgia, with 5,875 miles, 
currently has the highest percentage of these 
highways classified in good condition based on 
smoothness only. The Missouri definition of good 



uses smoothness as one factor; however, it also 
includes other condition factors such as physical 
distress to determine quality. While the comparison 
is not exact, it does indicate the level of performance 
possible on a system of Missouri's size. 

This is an annual measure. Missouri data is updated 
in January to reflect prior calendar-year ratings. 

Improvement Status: 

Progress continues toward improvement of the major 
highway system. Currently, more than 83 percent of 
these roadways are in good or better condition, a 37 
percent improvement in the last four years. With the 
completion of the Better Roads, Brighter Future 
program in 201 1, a total of 85 percent of the major 
highways will have improved surfaces along with 
new or improved shoulders and rumble stripes. 
However, all 5,573 miles will benefit from safety 
features such as wider striping and brighter signing. 
There are currently more than 180 BRBF projects in 
the 2009-2013 Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program that will address more than 
1,700 major highway miles. 

Funding for BRBF will come from existing Taking 
Care of System funds in accordance with the current 
funding allocation directed by the Missouri 
Highways and Transportation Commission. 

The Interstate System is the backbone of the major 
highway network. While it includes only about 7 
percent of the state highway mileage, it accounts for 
more than half the total state vehicles miles traveled. 
The increased emphasis on maintenance and 
operation of interstate highways that began in 2008 
will continue into 2009. The Interstate Maintenance 
Plan sets specific goals, standards and responsibilities 
for the condition of these vital highways. 

More than $430 million per year is dedicated to 
taking care of the existing highway system. Of this 
total, $125 million is reserved for work on the 
Interstate System and major bridges. 



2b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 




2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



* Source data for Georgia is "Highway Statistics" published 
for 2008 was not available at time of publication. Data is bai 
PSR - as submitted as part of the Highway Performance Monitfl 



he Federal Highway Administration. Georgia data 
ion a combination of pavement smoothness - IRI or 
mg System. 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Percent of minor highways that are in good condition-2c 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Jay Bledsoe, Transportation System Analysis Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the condition of Missouri's 
minor highway road surfaces. The public has 
indicated the condition of Missouri's existing state 
roadway system should be one of the state's highest 
priorities. MoDOT places a high priority on 
improving the condition of highways in the state 
system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The minor highway system consists of all routes 
functionally classified as minor arterials or collectors. 
These routes mainly serve local transportation needs 
and include highways commonly referred to as 
lettered routes, such as Route A, Route C and Route 
DD. The public sometimes refers to these routes as 
farm-to-market roads. The minor roads in Missouri 
total approximately 27,000 centerline miles. 

Good condition is defined using a combination of 
criteria. Smoothness is evaluated using the 
International Roughness Index (IRI). Pavements 
below the prescribed threshold are considered good. 
However, public surveys have shown that physical 
condition is more important than ride on lower speed, 
lower volume roadways. Condition index, a measure 
of visual distress, is also evaluated and if those 
criteria are met, the roadway is considered good, 
regardless of the smoothness component. 

Direct comparison to other states is difficult because 
of differences in measurement methodologies. 
However, a general order-of-magnitude comparison 
is possible given certain assumptions. For example, 
there are six states that report mileage for minor 
highways within 10 percent of that maintained by 
MoDOT. Of these six, Georgia, with 24,707 miles, 
currently has the highest percentage of these 
highways classified in good condition. The ratings 
reported by states as part of the Highway 
Performance Monitoring System for roads classified 
as minor more closely relate to Missouri's rating 
system. 

Federal Highway Administration allows conditions 
on minor highways to be reported on either IRI or 



Present Serviceability Index (PSI). PSI includes an 
assessment of physical distress similar to Missouri's 
definition. The Missouri definition of good uses 
smoothness as one factor. However, it also includes 
other condition factors such as physical distress to 
determine quality. 

This is an annual measure. Missouri data is updated 
in January to reflect prior calendar-year ratings. 

Improvement Status: 

Through the Better Roads, Brighter Future program, 
MoDOT has identified the major highway system as 
a priority for the next five years. Efforts on the 
minor highways will emphasize maintenance of this 
system at or near the current levels. Work on minor 
highways will emphasize the use of MoDOT 
maintenance forces and will consist of treatments that 
include routine patching, crack sealing and chip seals. 

The following graph shows a slight increase in minor 
highway conditions in 2008. This is a direct result of 
a change in the method of rating from previous years. 
Previously, the second component evaluated was 
Present Serviceability Rating (PSR), which also 
includes a smoothness component. Switching to 
condition index as discussed earlier provides the 
small increase shown. Had the change from PSR not 
been made, the 2008 percentage would have dropped 
to approximately 55. 

MoDOT is positioned to react quickly to the federal 
economic stimulus package. Plans have been 
developed assuming $60 million will be available for 
minor road improvements. These plans assume a mix 
of thin overlays and cold-in-place recycling to be 
done by contract. In addition, some funds will be 
used to upgrade select corridors with surface 
improvements, shoulders and other safety 
improvements. While the plan was developed using 
a specific funding amount, it can be easily scaled to 
take advantage of whatever amount is ultimately 
available. 



2c 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



100 

80 



s 60 

o 

I 40 




20 



Percent of Minor Highways That 
Are in Good Condition 



84.1 



61.7 



81.8 



77.9 



61.7 



2004 2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



1 



—Georgia* j 
□ Missouri J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



* Source data for Georgia is "Highway Statistics" published by the Federal Highway Administration. Georgia data 
for 2008 was not available at time of publication. Data is based on a combination of pavement smoothness - IRI or 
PSR - as submitted as part of the Highway Performance Monitoring System. 




July 2009 



2c (2) 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Percent of vehicle miles traveled on major highways in good 
conditioned 



Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Jay Bledsoe, Transportation System Analysis Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the percent of vehicle miles 
traveled (VMT) on Missouri's major highway system 
that take place on highways in good condition. The 
public has indicated the condition of Missouri's 
existing state roadway system should be one of the 
state's highest priorities. Emphasizing work on the 
major highway system insures that the majority of 
travel takes place on highways in good condition. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The major highway system is defined as all routes 
functionally classified as principal arterials. By 
definition, the principal arterial system provides for 
statewide or interstate movement of traffic. 
Examples include the interstate system and most U.S. 
routes such as 63, 54 or 36. 

In urban areas, principal arterials carry traffic 
entering or leaving the urban area and serve 
movement of vehicles between central business 
districts and suburban residential areas. Examples 
include Business 50 (Missouri Blvd.) in Jefferson 
City, MO 740 (Stadium Blvd.) in Columbia and 
Route D (Page Ave.) in St. Louis. 

The major roads in Missouri total approximately 
5,573 centerline miles. Good condition is defined 
using a combination of criteria. On high-speed routes 
(speed limits greater than 50 mph) the International 
Roughness Index (IRI) is used. For lower-speed 
routes (mostly urban areas) where smoothness is less 
critical, a Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) is used. 
While smoothness is a factor in PSR, physical 
condition is also a factor. 

VMT is determined by multiplying the traffic volume 
on a given route by the route length. For this 
measure, the VMT is calculated on those routes in 
good condition and then divided by the total VMT for 
major routes to determine the percentage shown 
below. While the system of major highways in 
Missouri comprises only about 17 percent of the total 



system mileage, it carries more than 75 percent of all 
traffic on the state highway system. This is an annual 
measure updated each January. 

Improvement Status: 

Progress continues toward improvement of the major 
highway system. Currently, more than 83 percent of 
these roadways are in good or better condition, a 37 
percent improvement in the last four years. With the 
completion of the Better Roads, Brighter Future 
program in 201 1, a total of 85 percent of the major 
highways will have improved surfaces along with 
new or improved shoulders and rumble stripes. 
However, all 5,573 miles will benefit from safety 
features such as wider striping and brighter signing. 
There are currently more than 180 BRBF projects in 
the 2009-2013 Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program that will address more than 
1,700 major highway miles. 

Funding for BRBF will come from existing Taking 
Care of System (TCOS) funds in accordance with the 
current funding allocation directed by the Missouri 
Highways and Transportation Commission. 

The Interstate System is the backbone of the major 
highway network. While it includes only about 7 
percent of the state highway mileage, it accounts for 
more than half the total state vehicles miles traveled. 
The increased emphasis on maintenance and 
operation of interstate highways that began in 2008 
will continue into 2009. The Interstate Maintenance 
Plan sets specific goals, standards and responsibilities 
for the condition of these vital highways. 

More than $430 million per year is dedicated to 
taking care of the existing highway system. Funding 
for the Better Roads, Brighter Future program will 
come from existing TCOS funds in accordance with 
the current funding allocation directed by the 
Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission. 



2d 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 




100 



Percent of Vehicle Miles Traveled 
on Major Highways in Good Condition 




2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zt 



July 2009 



2d (2) 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Percent of deficient bridges on major highways-2e 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Dennis Heckman, State Bridge Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks progress toward improving the 
condition of Missouri's bridges on major highways. 
The public has indicated the condition of Missouri's 
existing roadway system should be one of the state's 
highest priorities. MoDOT places a high priority on 
increasing the quality of bridges on the state system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The major highway system is defined as all routes 
functionally classified as principal arterials. By 
definition, the principal arterial system provides for 
statewide or interstate movement of traffic. Examples 
include the Interstate System or most U.S. routes 
such as 63, 54 or 36. 

In urban areas, principal arterials carry traffic 
entering or leaving the urban area and serve 
movement of vehicles between central business 
districts and suburban residential areas. Examples 
include Business 50 (Missouri Blvd.) in Jefferson 
City, MO 740 (Stadium Blvd.) in Columbia and 
Route D (Page Ave.) in St. Louis. 



A bridge is considered deficient if it is either 
structurally deficient (SD) or functionally obsolete 
(FO) as defined using Federal Highway 



Administration criteria. A SD bridge is in poor 
condition or has insufficient load capacity when 
compared to modern design standards. A FO bridge 
has poor roadway alignment or has clearance or 
width restrictions that no longer meet the usual 
criteria for the system it serves. MoDOT staff inspect 
all state-owned bridges. There are currently 3,351 
bridges on major highways. This is an annual 
measure and data is updated each April based on the 
prior year's inspections. 

Improvement Status: 

Bridge conditions on major highways have taken a 
small step backward. While the percentage of 
deficient bridges has been reduced from 19.0 percent 
to 17.1 percent over the last six years, this percentage 
actually increased slightly from 2007 to 2008. 

The Safe & Sound Bridge Improvement Program will 
address more than 800 of the state's most critical 
structures. This program will repair or replace these 
bridges over the next five years. While most of these 
bridges are located on the minor highway system, a 
small benefit to bridges on major highways is also 
anticipated (0.5 percent drop in this measure). 



Percent of Deficient Bridges on Major Highways 

40 



C 30 
CD 

O 20 
CD 
Q- 10 



19.0 



18.0 



17.7 



17.0 



17.1 



2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



2e 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Percent of deficient bridges on minor highways-2f 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Dennis Heckman, State Bridge Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks progress toward improving the 
condition of Missouri's minor highway bridges. The 
public has indicated the condition of Missouri's 
existing roadway system should be one of the state's 
highest priorities. MoDOT places a high priority on 
increasing the quality of bridges on the state system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The minor highway system consists of all routes 
functionally classified as minor arterials or collectors. 
These routes serve more local transportation needs 
and include highways commonly referred to as 
lettered routes, such as Route A, Route C and Route 
DD. The public sometimes refers to these routes as 
farm-to-market roads. 



A bridge is considered deficient if it is either 
structurally deficient (SD) or functionally obsolete 
(FO) as defined using Federal Highway 
Administration criteria. A SD bridge is in poor 
condition or has insufficient load capacity when 
compared to modern design standards. A FO bridge 
has poor roadway alignment or has clearance or 
width restrictions that no longer meet the usual 
criteria for the system it serves. MoDOT staff 



inspects all state-owned bridges. There are currently 
6,898 bridges on minor highways. This is an annual 
measure and data is updated each April based on the 
prior year's inspections. 

Improvement Status: 

Bridge conditions on minor highways have shown a 
slight improvement from 2007 to 2008. The 
percentage of deficient bridges has been reduced 
from 33.9 percent to 32.8 percent over the last six 
years. 

The strategy to improve this measure is the Safe & 
Sound Bridge Improvement Program. This program 
will repair or replace over 800 bridges over the next 
five years. Most of these bridges are located on the 
minor highway system. A decrease in the number of 
deficient bridges is expected to occur with the 
completion of this program. However, due to the 
accelerating rate of bridges becoming deficient, there 
still will be a sizable number of deficient bridges on 
the system. It is projected that this measure will drop 
to 30.0 percent at Safe & Sound's completion. 



Percent of Deficient Bridges on Minor Highways 

60 
50 



c 40 
CD 
O 30 

£ 20 

10 





33.9 



33.4 



33.2 



32.5 



32.9 



32.8 



2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



2F 



Smooth and Unrestricted Roads and Bridges 



Number of deficient bridges on the state system 
(major and minor highways)-2g 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Dennis Heckman, State Bridge Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks progress toward improving the 
condition of Missouri's bridges. The public has 
indicated the condition of Missouri's existing 
roadway system should be one of the state's highest 
priorities. MoDOT places a high priority on 
increasing the quality of bridges on the state system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

A bridge is considered deficient if it is either 
structurally deficient (SD) or functionally obsolete 
(FO) as defined using Federal Highway 
Administration criteria. A SD bridge is in poor 
condition or has insufficient load capacity when 
compared to modern design standards. A FO bridge 
has poor roadway alignment or has clearance or 
width restrictions that no longer meet the usual 
criteria for the system it serves. MoDOT staff inspect 
all state-owned bridges. There are currently a total of 
10,249 bridges on the state highway system. 

This is an annual measure and data is taken from 
FHWA's National Bridge Inventory. Missouri data is 
available in April of each calendar year and is 



updated in the April Tracker. The data for other states 
is not published until the following year. 

Improvement Status: 

Bridge conditions on Missouri highways have taken a 
small step forward. While the number of deficient 
bridges on the state system has seen a steady 
reduction from 2,959 to 2,838 over the last six years, 
this number has been fairly stable from 2006 thru 
2008. Of the 2,838 deficient bridges, 1,121 are 
functionally obsolete and 1,717 are structurally 
deficient. 

The strategy to improve this measure is the Safe & 
Sound Bridge Improvement Program that will repair 
or replace more than 800 of the state's most critical 
structures in five years. A decrease in the number of 
deficient bridges is expected with the completion of 
this program. However, due to the accelerating rate 
of bridges becoming deficient, there will still be a 
sizable number of deficient bridges on the system. It 
is projected that this measure will drop to 2,500 at the 
completion of the Safe & Sound Bridge Improvement 
Program. 



Number of Deficient Bridges on the State System 
(Major and Minor Highways) 



3,000 
j§ 2,825 
I 2,650 



2,475 
2,300 



2,959 



2,907 



2,384 



T53S" 



o 



2,892 



2,83 6 



2,482 



2,486 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2,8 44 



2, 8 3 8 



2,478 



2007 



2008 



■^H Missouri 
O Ohio 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Source for Ohio, "Better Bridges" November 2008, for data collected in calendar year 2007. 



2g 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



Safe Transportation System 

Tangible Result Driver- Don Hill is, Director of System Management 



MoDOT works closely with other safety advocates to make our roads and work zones 
safer. The department supports educational programs that encourage safe driving 
practices and enforcement efforts that increase adherence to traffic laws. MoDOT will 
not compromise safety because it believes in the well-being of its employees and 
customers. 




Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of fatalities and disabling injuries-3a 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatal and disabling 
injuries resulting from traffic crashes on all Missouri 
roadways. This data drives the development and focus 
of the Missouri Highway Safety Plan. This plan is 
required annually by the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration and outlines key strategies to 
reduce these losses. In addition, this data supports 
Missouri's Blueprint to Arrive Alive. This document 
identifies the statewide initiatives with a goal of 
reducing fatalities to 850 or fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Crash data is collected by the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol and entered into a traffic accident 
record system. The record system automatically 
updates MoDOT's traffic management system. 
Crash data reports are available to law enforcement 
and traffic safety advocates for crash analysis through 
both databases. Final data is collected on an annual 
basis and is updated in July of the following year. 
Note: The 2009 quarterly fatalities are not final 
numbers. 



Improvement Status: 

Fatalities decreased 24 percent from 2005 to 2008 in a 
continued downward trend. Until 2007, Missouri had 
not been under 1,000 fatalities since 1993. The 960 
fatalities in 2008 means the Missouri Coalition for 
Roadway Safety can again celebrate accomplishing 
their goal of 1,000 or fewer fatalities by 2008. 
Disabling injuries continue to show a decreasing trend 
with a reduction of over 400 when compared to the 
2006 number. The national data comparison shows that 
Missouri moved from 38 th in 2006 to 35 th in 2007 for 
total fatalities. The 2008 national comparison is not yet 
available. Fatalities and disabling injuries are 
decreasing due in part to engineering enhancements 
such as three-strand guard cable, rumble strips and 
enhanced delineation. Also contributing are strong 
safety belt public information campaigns combined 
with increased law enforcement participation in 
statewide campaigns. 



1,400 
J, 200 
01,000 
c 800 
§ 600 
z 400 
200 




Number of Fatalities 







1257 


1096 




307 








992 960 




270 


326 






249 




262 






273 








274 


251 




323 




285 






346 






248 




243 













2005 



2006 



2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



^□4thQtr 

□ 3rdQtr 

□ 2ndQtr 

□ IstQtr 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



10,000 



Number of Disabling Injuries 




2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



3a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



For all graphs on this page, the following legend applies: 

□States that have primary seat belt laws 

□States that have secondary seat belt laws 

ZlStates that have neither a primary nor a secondary seat belt law (1 total) 

■ Missouri - secondary seat belt law in place (Source: www. ghsa.org July 2008) 



Missouri 's National Ranking by Total Number of Fatalities 

2007 



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3a (2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of impaired driver-related fatalities and disabling injuries-3b 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatalities and 
injuries resulting from traffic crashes on all Missouri 
roadways involving drivers who are impaired by 
alcohol and/or drugs. This data drives the 
development and focus of the Missouri Highway 
Safety Plan. This plan is required annually by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and 
outlines key strategies to reduce these losses. In 
addition, this data supports Missouri's Blueprint to 
Arrive Alive. This document identifies the statewide 
initiatives with a goal of reducing fatalities to 850 or 
fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Crash data is collected by the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol and entered into a traffic accident 
record system. The record system automatically 
updates MoDOT's traffic management system. 
Crash data reports are available to law enforcement 
and traffic safety advocates for crash analysis 
through both databases. Final data is collected on 
an annual basis and is updated in July of the 
following year. 



Improvement Status: 

Alcohol- and drug-related fatalities remain steady after 
a three-year decrease. Disabling injuries continue to 
decrease in 2008. In the national comparison, Missouri 
moved from 41 st in 2006 to 35 th in 2007. The 2008 
comparison is not yet available. In addition to 
Missouri participating in the national "You Drink and 
Drive, You Lose" campaign, the Missouri Law 
Enforcement Traffic Safety Advisory Council selected 
specific days to increase law enforcement activity 
through December 2009. Public information and 
education has been directed at high-risk drivers ages 
21 to 35. Law enforcement efforts have been 
concentrated on high-crash corridors and increasing 
the number of sobriety checkpoints. These efforts 
have helped reduce impaired driving crashes overall 
and have started a downward trend in fatalities and 
disabling injuries. An increasing number of people 
who work in liquor establishments are completing the 
online server training modules that were first 
developed in 2005. 



Number of Impaired Driver-Related Fatalities 
Alcohol & Drug Involved 



^ 400 

j§ 300 

E 200 

-2 ioo 




1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I — 



2004 



2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Number of Impaired Driver- Related Disabling Injuries 
Alcohol & Drug Involved 

_ 1,600 

j§ 1,200 

E 800 

Z 400 



1 | 1 | 



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2004 



2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



3b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



Missouri's National Ranking by Percent Killed in 
Alcohol -Related Crashes 

2007 
100 

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2006 
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2005 
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Safe Transportation System 



Rate of annual fatalities and disabling injuries-3c 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatal and 
disabling injury rates per 100 million vehicle miles 
traveled (HMVM) in Missouri. This data drives the 
development and focus of the Missouri Highway 
Safety Plan. This plan is required annually by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and 
outlines key strategies to reduce these losses. In 
addition, this data supports Missouri's Blueprint to 
Arrive Alive. This document identifies the statewide 
initiatives with a goal of reducing fatalities to 850 or 
fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Crash data is collected by the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol and entered into a traffic accident 
record system. The record system automatically 
updates MoDOT's traffic management system. 
Crash data reports are available to law enforcement 



and traffic safety advocates for crash analysis 
through both databases. Data is collected on an 
annual basis and is updated in July of the following 
year. 

Improvement Status: 

Both the fatality and disabling injury rates in 
Missouri are at the lowest ever recorded. Missouri 
has seen a 23 percent decrease since 2005. Based 
on the national comparison, Missouri has moved 
from 34 th in 2006 to 30 th in 2007. The 2008 national 
comparison is not yet available. Based on the 
NHTSA national goal of a 1.0 fatality rate, Missouri 
is still moving in the right direction. Focused law 
enforcement efforts, engineering safety 
enhancements and increased public awareness all 
contribute to the decrease. 





"5 



Rate of Annual Fatalities 



H H B 



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2004 



2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



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12 
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4 




Rate of Annual Disabling Injuries 






2004 



2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



3C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



Missouri's National Ranking in State Fatality Rates 

2007 


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2005 


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July 2009 



3c (2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Percent of safety belt/passenger vehicle restraint use-3d 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in safety belt usage 
by persons in passenger vehicles. This data drives the 
development and focus of the Missouri Highway 
Safety Plan. This plan is required annually by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and 
outlines key strategies to reduce these losses. In 
addition, this data supports Missouri's Blueprint to 
Arrive Alive. This document identifies the statewide 
initiatives with a goal of reducing fatalities to 850 or 
fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Each June, a statewide survey is conducted at 460 
pre- selected locations in 20 counties. The data 
collected at these sites is calculated into a safety belt 
usage rate by using a formula approved by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 
The safety belt usage survey enables data collection 
from locations representative of 85 percent of the 
state's population. The data collection plan is the 
same each year for consistency and compliance with 
the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
guidelines. Data is collected on an annual basis and 
is updated in August of the following year. Annual 
information for the national rankings may not be 
available from all 50 states. 



Improvement Status: 

Safety belt use in Missouri has remained fairly 
constant for the past five years. In the 2008 national 
comparison, Missouri ranked 40 th in safety belt usage. 
The national average for seat belt use for 2008 is 83%. 
Missouri currently has a secondary seat belt law, 
which means law enforcement may not stop a vehicle 
solely to determine seat belt compliance. Law 
enforcement must observe another driving violation to 
stop a vehicle and issue a seat belt citation. Many 
states have a primary seat belt law, which means law 
enforcement may stop a vehicle if they observe an 
occupant is not wearing a seat belt. Missouri 
continues to focus efforts through public information 
and education and law enforcement participation in the 
national "Click It or Ticket" campaign. The Law 
Enforcement Traffic Safety Advisory Council 
(LETS AC) recently added additional quarterly 
enforcement dates through December 2009 to focus on 
safety belt use. A statewide program focusing on teen 
safety belt use has also proven to be successful in 
increasing use among teenagers. MoDOT continues to 
promote the need for a primary safety belt law in 
Missouri. 



Percent of Safety Belt/Passenger Vehicle Restraint Use 




^■Missouri 

-■—Nationwide - 
Primary States 

A Nationwide - 
Secondary States 



DESIRED 
TREND 



2004 2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



Zi 



3D 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



For all graphs on this page, the following legend applies: 
I | States that have primary seat belt laws 
□ States that have secondary seat belt laws 

Z\ States that have neither a primary nor a secondary seat belt law (1 total) 
I Missouri - secondary seat belt law in place (Source: http://www.ghsa.gov/ , June 2008) 



Missouri's National Ranking in Safety Belt Use 

2008 ' 
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July 2009 



3d (2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of bicycle and pedestrian fatalities and disabling injuries-3e 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatalities and 
disabling injuries resulting from traffic crashes with 
bicycles and pedestrians on Missouri roadways. This 
data drives the development and focus of the 
Missouri Highway Safety Plan. This plan is required 
annually by the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration and outlines key strategies to reduce 
these losses. In addition, this data supports Missouri's 
Blueprint to Arrive Alive. This document identifies 
the statewide initiatives with a goal of reducing 
fatalities to 850 or fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Crash data is collected by the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol and entered into a traffic accident 
record system. The record system automatically 
updates MoDOT's traffic management system. 



Crash data reports are available to law enforcement 
and traffic safety advocates for crash analysis through 
both databases. Final data is collected on an annual 
basis and updated in July of the following year. 

Improvement Status: 

This data reflects the number of fatalities and 
disabling injuries occurring when a motor vehicle is 
involved in a crash with a bicycle or pedestrian. 
These bicycle numbers remain steady, although 
MoDOT has been increasing the miles of dedicated 
bike lanes. Pedestrian fatalities and disabling injuries 
show a slight decrease over the past five years due to 
signaling and dedicated crossing area improvements. 
Funds have been dedicated to support the Bicycle 
Pedestrian Advisory Committee. 



Number of Bicycle Fatalities 




3e 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



120 

100 

<j> 80 

£ 60 

3 
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20 





Number of Bicycle Disabling Injuries 




2004 





2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



100 
80 

n 60 

E 

2. 40 



20 




Number of Pedestrian Fatalities 





2004 2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



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400 
5 300 

| 200 

z 

100 




Number of Pedestrian Disabling Injuries 





2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



3E(2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of motorcycle fatalities and disabling injuries-3f 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Leanna Depue, Highway Safety Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatal and 
disabling injuries resulting from motorcycle traffic 
crashes on all Missouri roadways. This data drives 
the development and focus of the Missouri Highway 
Safety Plan. This plan is required annually by the 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and 
outlines key strategies to reduce these losses. In 
addition, this data supports the Missouri's Blueprint 
to Arrive Alive. This document identifies the 
statewide initiatives with a goal of reducing fatalities 
to 850 or fewer by 2012. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Crash data is collected by the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol and entered into a traffic accident 
record system. The record system automatically 
updates MoDOT's traffic management system. 
Crash data reports are available to law enforcement 
and traffic safety advocates for crash analysis through 



both databases. Final data is collected on an annual 
basis and updated in July of the following year. 

Improvement Status: 

Motorcycle fatalities and disabling injuries have 
shown an upward trend over the past five years. 
Missouri continues to experience high numbers of 
motorcycle fatalities. The national data comparison 
shows Missouri moved from 33 rd in 2006 to 32 nd in 
2007. The 2008 national comparison is not yet 
available. Longer riding seasons and a significant 
increase in the number of licensed motorcycles and 
riders has increased the exposure rate in recent years. 
Rider education classes are offered within one hour's 
driving time throughout Missouri. More than 5,000 
riders at 28 sites are trained each year. In 2006, a 
Motorcycle Safety Task Force was organized and 
charged with developing a strategic plan. The task 
force has completed the plan and continues to move 
forward with implementation. 



Number of Motorcycle Fatalities 



150 




2004 



2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



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Number of Motorcycle Disabling Injuries 









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2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



3f 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



For all graphs on this page, the following legend applies: 

■ States that have all rider helmet laws 

□ States that require use for a specific segment of riders (usually under age 18) 

Z\ States that do not require helmet use (3 total) 

1 Missouri - motorcycle helmet law in place (Source: www.nhtsa.gov January 2008) 



600 
<D 

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I 200 



Missouri's National Ranking in Motorcycle Fatalities 

2007 



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2006 



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July 2009 



3F(2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of commercial motor vehicle crashes resulting in fatalities-3g 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of Systems Management 

Measurement Driver: Mark Biesemeyer, Motor Carrier Services Program Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of commercial motor 
vehicles involved in fatal crashes each year. MoDOT 
uses the information to target educational and 
enforcement efforts. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The Missouri State Highway Patrol collects and 
records the crash statistics used in this measure. The 
data used in this measure reports the number of 
commercial motor vehicles involved in a crash where 
one or more people die within 30 days as a result of 
the crash. This is an annual measure and will be 
updated each April for the previous year. 

Improvement Status: 

The preliminary number of fatal crashes reported in 
2008 is 113, which is 1 1 fewer than those reported in 
2007. This is a 8.9 percent reduction in one year. 
Between 2004 and 2008, the number of Missouri 
commercial motor vehicle fatal crashes dropped from 
153 to 113, a 26.1 percent decrease. MoDOT 
coordinates its efforts to reduce fatal CMV crashes 



with the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the Federal 
Motor Carrier Safety Administration Missouri 
Division and the Kansas City and St. Louis police 
departments. MoDOT efforts include the installation 
of larger highway signs, highly reflective pavement 
markings, cable guardrails, roundabout intersections, 
incident management alert signs, roadside rumble 
strips, and intelligent transportation systems at scales. 
MoDOT conducts carrier safety training, regulation 
compliance reviews, safety audits of new motor carrier 
firms and truck inspections at terminals and 
destinations. The MSHP, St. Louis and Kansas City 
Police Departments conduct commercial vehicle 
roadside inspections in order to remove unsafe drivers 
and vehicles from the road. 

Missouri ranked 38 th in the number of fatality crashes 
nationwide in 2007. Rankings of 2008 are not yet 
available. 



Number of Commercial Motor Vehicle Crashes 
Resulting in Fatalities 



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Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



Missouri's National Ranking in Number of 
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2007 



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July 2009 



3G(2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of commercial motor vehicle crashes resulting in injuries-3h 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of Systems Management 

Measurement Driver: Mark Biesemeyer, Motor Carrier Services Program Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks number of commercial motor 
vehicles involved in injury crashes each year. 
MoDOT uses the information to target educational 
and enforcement efforts. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The Missouri State Highway Patrol collects and 
records crash statistics. The data for this measure 
reflects the number of commercial motor vehicles 
involved in crashes where one or more people are 
injured. This is an annual measure and will be 
updated each July for the previous year. 

Improvement Status: 

The final number of injury crashes reported in 2008 
is 2,355, which is 36 fewer than those reported in 
2007. This is a 1.5 percent reduction in one year. 
Between 2005 and 2008, the number of commercial 
motor vehicle crashes resulting in injuries dropped 
from 2,694 to 2,355, a decrease of 12.6 percent. 



The overall downward trend is due to the coordinated 
safety efforts of MoDOT, the Missouri State 
Highway Patrol, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration Missouri Division, and the Kansas 
City and St. Louis police departments. MoDOT 
efforts include the installation of larger highway 
signs, highly reflective pavement markings, cable 
guardrails, roundabout intersections, incident 
management alert signs, rumble stripes, and 
intelligent transportation systems at scales. MoDOT 
conducts carrier safety training, regulation 
compliance reviews, safety audits of new motor 
carrier firms and truck inspections at terminals and 
destinations. The MS HP, St. Louis and Kansas City 
police departments conduct commercial vehicle 
roadside inspections in order to remove unsafe 
drivers and vehicles from the road. 

Missouri ranked 41 st in the number of injury crashes 
nationwide in 2007. Rankings for 2008 are not yet 
available as they are updated each September. 



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Safe Transportation System 



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Missouri's National Ranking in Number of 
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2007 



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Missouri's National Ranking in Number of 
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July 2009 



3h(2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of fatalities and injuries in work zones-3i 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Troy Pinkerton, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

An important factor in evaluating the safety of 
Missouri's transportation system is determining the 
safety of work zones on the state's roads. This 
measure tracks the number of traffic-related fatalities, 
injuries, and overall crashes occurring in work zones 
on any Missouri public road. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Missouri law enforcement agencies are required to 
report crashes by submitting a standardized vehicle 
accident report form to the Missouri State Highway 
Patrol. MSHP personnel enter these reports into a 
statewide traffic crash database. MoDOT staff query 
and analyze this data to identify work zone-related 



crash statistics quarterly and report the results via this 
measurement. 

Improvement Status: 

For this quarter, there were four fatal accidents 
resulting in five fatalities. The number of crashes and 
injuries continues on a downward trend. Efforts to 
enhance work zone advanced warning signs on many 
projects have been implemented for this construction 
season. 

In order to continue to make our work zones safer, a 
new Work Zone Survey is available to the public that 
can be filled out and submitted online at: 
http://www. modot. mo. gov/workzones/Comments. htm 



Number of Fatalities in Work Zones 




i 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



YTD 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



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31 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of Disabling Injuries in Work Zones 

150 



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120 



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2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



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£ 600 

300 




Number of Minor Injuries in Work Zones 


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July 2009 



3K2) 



Safe Transportation System 



Number of highway-rail crossing fatalities and collisions-3j 

Results Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Rod Massman, Administrator of Railroads 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks annual trends in fatalities and 
collisions resulting from train- vehicle crashes at 
public railroad crossings in Missouri. This data 
drives the development and focus of the Missouri 
Highway Safety Plan. This plan is required annually 
by the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration and outlines key strategies to reduce 
these losses. In addition, this data supports the 
Missouri Blueprint for Safer Roadways. This 
document identifies the statewide initiatives with a 
goal of reducing fatalities in all areas of highway 
safety, including highway-rail crossing safety. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT collects crash data and enters it in a railroad 
safety information system used to update MoDOT' s 
traffic management system. This does not include 
fatalities or collisions from those on railroad property 
at areas other than at public railroad crossings, which 
are tabulated separately. Missouri is then ranked 
with all other states using data from the Federal 
Railroad Administration that consists of the numbers 
of collisions and fatalities in each state. Data is 
updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT continues to coordinate its railroad crossing 
projects in the areas of greatest need using a safety 
exposure index in addition to focusing on crossings 
with a history of accidents or limited sight distance. 
By agreeing with the railroads to look at a defined 
area, called a corridor, and sharing financial 
responsibilities for improvements, limited funds can 
be spread over a wider area. This increases the 
number of overall projects completed in specific 
areas of the state. 



Other improvements include an increased emphasis 
on and MoDOT employee participation in public 
outreach opportunities on rail safety in conjunction 
with Operation Lifesaver, Inc. MoDOT is exploring 
partnerships with other government agencies, cities 
and school districts to upgrade flasher-only crossings 
to crossings with both lights and gates, to install gates 
and lights at crossings, and to replace outdated 
lighting with LED systems. There is a renewed 
emphasis on closing unsafe, redundant or 
unnecessary crossings. 

In the first four months of 2009, there were zero 
crossing fatalities. The goal, however, is to push the 
number of fatalities lower each year. In order to 
accomplish this, MoDOT has increased and implemented 
more public outreach efforts along with engineering 
improvements. This has included participating in various 
kinds of safety fairs, which includes presenting rail issues 
alongside other safety-related topics, renewing efforts to 
present rail crossing information at driver's education and 
other high school and grade school classes, and certifying 
additional MoDOT employees in giving Operation 
Lifesaver presentations. MoDOT also sponsored Rail 
Safety Week in April 2009 and conducted "positive 
enforcement" efforts at crossings in Independence, 
Jefferson City, and Kirkwood, which received extensive 
public and media attention. The continuing focus is the 
three Es: engineering, education and enforcement. This 
effort is designed to increase public awareness and 
discussion of the need for increased safety and heightened 
awareness at railroad crossings and the dangers of walking 
on tracks or other railroad property. 



3j 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Safe Transportation System 



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2005 



2006 




2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



YTD 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



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January-December 2008 



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3j(3) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



Roadway Visibility 

Tangible Result Driver - Don Hill is, Director of System Management 







Good roadway visibility in all weather and light conditions is critical to safe and efficient 
travel. MoDOT will delight its customers by using top-quality and highly visible stripes 
and signs. 



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Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Roadway visibility 



Rate of nighttime crashes-4a 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Mike Curtit, Assistant State Traffic Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the types of crashes where 
visibility of stripes and signs may be a contributing 
crash factor. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data is collected from the statewide crash database to 
identify and measure the rate of nighttime crashes. 
Further filtering of the data divides these night 
crashes by major and minor roadways. Major 
roadways are generally used for statewide or 
interstate travel and minor roadways are generally 
used for local traffic needs. Crash rates are 
calculated using the average annual daily traffic 
counts and are expressed in the unit, per 100 million 
vehicle miles (HMVM), which is the national 
standard for expressing crash rates. This is an annual 
measure with the data updated each April. 



Improvement Status: 

The crash rate for run-off-road crashes decreased 
slightly on major roads and decreased seven percent 
on minor roads. The crash rate for cross-median 
crashes on major roads also decreased just slightly. 
The crash rate for head-on and sideswipe crashes 
continues to be stable for major roads, but decreased 
23 percent this last year on minor roads. The crash 
rate for wet pavement crashes increased three percent 
for major roads, but decreased 12 percent for minor 
roads. Crashes during winter weather events for 
2007 and 2008 were similar, but were significantly 
higher than previous years. Most of this increase 
continues to be in the non-injury crash categories. 

As part of the improvements included in the Better 
Roads, Brighter Future program, over 290 miles of 
edgeline rumble strips/stripes and almost 120 miles 
of centerline rumble stripes have been installed. 



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Missouri Department of Transportation 



Roadway Visibility 



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2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



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© 



July 2009 



4A(2) 



Roadway visibility 



Percent of signs that meet customers' expectations-4b 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Mike Curtit, Assistant State Traffic Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure will track whether the department' s 
sign policy, design standards and sign replacement 
policy are resulting in visible signs that meet 
customers' expectations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Sign-quality attributes that define user expectations 
have been developed based on an industry-wide 
literature review. The attributes selected for this 
measure are those that can be captured during a night 
sign log. A night sign log is conducted on randomly 
generated road segments. MoDOT employees drive a 
road at night, recording the location and condition of 
the signs, particularly how visible the signs are with 
headlights. MoDOT employees collect the data 
annually in the fall, and update it each October. 



Improvement Status: 

Over 91 percent of signs on major highways are in 
good condition. Almost 8 1 percent of signs on 
minor roads are in good condition. This represents a 
slight increase from last year for both major and 
minor roads. 

In the last twelve months, MoDOT' s sign shop has 
produced over 101,000 new signs for the districts. In 
addition, six trainings in four different districts on 
proper sign installation and handling procedures were 
performed. MoDOT continues to perform annual 
inspections of every sign in Missouri and does 
random quality assurance reviews targeted at signing. 



Percent of Signs that 
Meet Customers' Expectations 




■ Major 
Road 

□ Minor 
Road 



2005 



2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 






4B 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Roadway Visibility 



Percent of stripes that meet customers' expectations-4c 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Jim Brocksmith, Traffic Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks whether MoDOT's striping 
policy, processes and materials used are resulting in 
visible stripes that meet customers' expectations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Striping quality attributes that define user 
expectations have been developed based on an 
industry-wide literature review. The attribute 
selected for this measure is the retroreilectivity of the 
striping or the visibility of the striping at night. 
Retroreilectivity is measured as the amount of light 
from vehicle headlights that is returned to the driver. 
We have established retroreilectivity benchmarks of 
150 for white and 125 for yellow. These benchmarks 
were chosen because they are at the high end of what 
research and other states consider minimum 
acceptable levels. Data is collected by taking 
retroreilectivity readings on randomly selected road 
segments in the fall and spring of each year. This 
data is then compared to the benchmarks. Traffic 
volumes, winter weather and pavement condition all 
have an impact on the performance and durability of 
striping. The measurement unit for retroreilectivity 
is millicandellas per meter squared per lux 
(mcd/m 2 /lux). Fall readings are taken in October and 
November as the striping season is ending. Spring 
readings are taken in April, May and June to reflect 
the condition of the markings coming out of the 
winter when they are typically the poorest. 



For the spring readings in 2009 we changed the 
amount and the way the readings are collected. The 
sampling size used was reduced both in the length of 
the samples and the number of samples used. We 
still have a statistically significant sample. These 
changes were implemented to reduce the costs 
associated with the data collection. 

Improvement Status: 

The data was analyzed in respect to the above 
benchmarks MoDOT set as the minimum acceptable 
level of retroreilectivity. The winter of 2008-09 was 
in general a rather mild winter, which means reduced 
damage to striping due to snowplows. The exception 
to this would be the southeastern part of the state in 
districts 9 and 10 that had a significant ice storm in 
December of 2008. The resulting low readings on 
the major roads in this part of the state are a large 
part of the decline to some of the lowest readings 
recorded in the spring. The results on the minor 
roads equal the best results we've seen in spring 
readings. 

We are expanding the use of wet reflective markings 
with the retro-fitting of approximately 2,400 miles of 
major roads with rumble stripes over the next two 
years. In addition, approximately 5,300 miles of 
minor roads will have edgelines added over the next 
four years. 



Percent of Stripes that Meet Customers' Expectations 



Major Roads 



Minor Roads 



Road Class 




□ Fall 2005 

□ Spring 2006 

□ Fall 2006 

□ Spring 2007 

■ Fall 2007 

■ Spring 2008 

□ Fall 2008 

■ Spring 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



4c 



Roadway Visibility 



Percent of work zones meeting expectations for visibility-4d 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 

Measurement Driver: Dan Smith, Traffic Management & Operations Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

An important factor in evaluating the department' s 
performance in temporary traffic control design, 
deployment, operation, and maintenance is the 
measurement of the effectiveness of the visual 
guidance provided to motorists in our work zones. 
This measure tracks how well the department meets 
customers' expectations of visibility in work zones 
on state highways. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

On January 1, 2009, MoDOT provided a Work Zone 
Customer Survey for the traveling public to provide 
evaluation of the visibility within work zones across 
the state. Each survey has several questions that 
address the early warning of work zones, visibility of 
signs and signals, did the cones, barrels or striping 
guide the person through the work zone, and did the 
work zone look clean and organized. The evaluator 
assigns a yes, no, or n/a rating to each of the 



questions. The overall ratings are compiled quarterly 
and reported via this measurement. The survey is on 
MoDOT website at the following address: 
http://www.modot.gov/workzones/Comments.htm . 

Improvement Status: 

Compilation of the 1,294 surveys performed by the 
traveling public and MoDOT staff between January 
and June of this calendar year resulted in an increase 
of positive satisfaction rating from 88 to 92 percent 
for work zone visibility. Since this is the first year 
the traveling public has had an opportunity to provide 
formal feedback on work zones, no historical data is 
available. For comparison purposes, the 2008 yearly 
average results of our technical staff inspections are 
included. The revised evaluation technique will 
allow MoDOT to align our priorities with that of our 
customers. 



Percent of Work Zones Meeting Expectations for Visibility 




2008 Average 



1st Quarter 2009 
Calendar Year 



2nd Quarter 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



4D 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 






Personal, Fast, Courteous and 
understandable response to 
Customer Requests (Inbound) 

Tangible Result Driver - Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 




■ 



Responding to customers in a courteous, personal and understandable way is impor- 
tant. MoDOT listens and seeks to understand, because it values everyone's opinion. 
MoDOT's goal is to delight them with its customer service. 



Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response to 
Customer Requests (Inbound) 



Percent of overall customer satisfaction-5a 



Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 

Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT's progress toward the 
mission of delighting its customers. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. Data is collected from 
telephone interviews with more than 3,500 randomly 
selected adult Missourians each May. MoDOT is 
using H.J. Heinz as the benchmark for this measure. 
Based on information compiled by the American 
Customer Satisfaction Index, Heinz has the highest 
customer satisfaction rate - 89 percent - out of the 
200 companies and government agencies that the 
ACSI scores. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT is nearing the national benchmark for 
customer satisfaction. A total of 85 percent of 



Missourians are satisfied with MoDOT, a 7 percent 
increase from last year and a dramatic 21 percent 
increase in just 10 years. MoDOT's customer 
satisfaction is just four percentage points below H.J. 
Heinz, the national benchmark. The percentage of 
people who are very satisfied with MoDOT rose to 
24 percent in 2009, up from 21 percent last year and 
5 percent in 2003. In the past year, those who 
reported being dissatisfied with MoDOT dropped 
from 23 percent to 15 percent, an 8 percent decrease. 
The increase in customer satisfaction can be 
attributed to MoDOT's efforts to improve road 
conditions, decrease highway fatalities, bring projects 
in on time and within budget, be open and transparent 
and provide timely, accurate and understandable 
information. 



100 



Percent of Overall Customer Satisfaction 







2003 2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



2009 



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H.J Heinz 



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Missouri Department of Transportation 



Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response to 

Customer Requests (Inbound) 



Percent of customers who contacted MoDOT that felt they were 
responded to quickly and courteously with an understandable 
response-5b 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure indicates whether customers are 
comfortable with the speed, courtesy and clarity of 
MoDOT customer service. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Customers who contact MoDOT Customer Service 
Centers are asked to complete a short telephone 
survey when their business with the customer service 
representatives is complete. Callers who agree are 
forwarded to an automated survey that asks three 
"yes or no" questions on the timeliness, accuracy and 
courtesy of the call. 



Improvement Status: 

The percentage of customers that feels they received 
prompt, courteous and understandable service 
remains extremely high. Based on 5,718 surveys, 
97.4 percent felt they were responded to quickly; 
99.3 percent felt they were treated courteously and 
98.1 percent felt the response they received was 
understandable. MoDOT customer service 
representatives continue to do an outstanding job in 
providing a positive first point of contact for 
MoDOT. 



Percent of Customers Who Contacted MoDOT That 
Felt They Were Responded to Quickly 

100 



h- 80 
c 
CD 
O 







60 
40 



20 








2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



5b 



Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response to 
Customer Requests (Inbound) 



Percent of Customers Who Contacted MoDOT That Felt 
They Were Responded To In a Personal and Courteous 

Manner 



100 



80 



c 60 
<D 

O 

a> 40 



20 




HHH 





2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



100 



80 



c 60 

<D 

O 

| 40 



20 



Percent of Customers Who 

Contacted MoDOT That Understood 

the Response Given 




2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



5b(2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response to 

Customer Requests (Inbound) 



Percent of documented customer requests responded to within 
24 hours-5c 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks how quickly MoDOT responds 
to customer requests through the customer service 
centers. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This information comes from the customer service 
database, where customer requests requiring follow- 
up are documented from the time the call comes in 
until the request is responded to. This may include 
requests for signs, traffic signal review, pothole 
patching or work zone congestion. Almost all 
customer requests are responded to immediately, 



including basic phone call transfers, questions, or 
requests for general information; these routine 
contacts are not documented here. 

Improvement Status: 

Customer requests in the second quarter of 2009 were 
responded to within 24 hours 99.8 percent of the 
time. This number remains consistently high across 
the board since we first began tracking the data. 
There were 7,839 documented customer requests in 
the quarter, an increase of almost 1,500 over last 
quarter. 



Percent of Documented Customer Requests 
Responded to Within 24 Hours 

100 



80 



c 60 
CD 



CD 



40 



20 




_ |_| |_| I 




2ndQtr. 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 1 st Qtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 
2008 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



5c 



Personal, Fast, Courteous and Understandable Response to 
Customer Requests (Inbound) 



Average completion time on requests requiring follow up-5d 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT's responsiveness to 
customer inquiries that are received through the 
customer service centers and documented in the 
database. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Customer requests in the customer service database 
are tracked for average completion time. Longer- 
term requests that require more than 30 days to 
complete are removed from the results because 



longer-term requests would skew the overall results. 
Time is measured in working days; weekends and 
holidays are excluded. 

Improvement Status: 

The average completion time on customer requests 
for the second quarter of 2009 remained steady at 1.5 
days. There were 7,839 documented customer 
requests in the quarter, an increase of almost 1,500 
over last quarter. 



</> 3 

D 

O 1 



Average Completion Time on Requests 

Requiring Follow-up 

(Excludes Long-Term Issues) 



WTh«-B-rH 



2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 1st Qtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



5d 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 




fesi 







■*iif 



partner with others to deliver 
Transportation Services 

Tangible Result Driver - Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

To be an effective leader in transportation, MoDOT must work with agencies and 
branches of government, including state, county, private industry and municipalities to 
deliver a quality transportation system that meets the needs of everyone. A coordinated 
transportation system requires partnerships to ensure compatible decisions are made. 
Partnering builds trust and ensures quality results. 




\ 



*- 












m 1 





Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Partner with Others to Deliver Transportation Services 



Number of dollars of discretionary funds allocated to Missouri-6a 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Todd Grosvenor, Financial Resource Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure shows the amount of discretionary 
funds allocated to Missouri. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each January. The 
federal government allocates discretionary funds to states 
for specific highway and multimodal projects. 
Multimodal projects include waterway, aviation and 
transit activities. These funds are distributed 
administratively for programs that do not have statutory 
distribution formulas. States compete for these funds, 
which are above the formula apportionments. Resource 
Management collects this information from the Federal 
Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration 
and Federal Aviation Administration. Missouri's share of 
the total highway funds allocated nationwide over the last 
five years is 3.8 percent, which ranks fifth. The state of 
California received the largest share with 12.7 percent. 
Missouri's share of the total multimodal funds allocated 
nationwide over the last five years is 1.6 percent, which 



ranks 22nd. The state of New York received the largest 
share with 14.1 percent. 

Improvement Status: 

Discretionary funds allocated to Missouri for 
highway projects increased in 2008. This was mainly 
due to an increase in the funds made available from 
the annual appropriations bill. The funds allocated to 
Missouri increased 18 percent from 2007 to 2008, 
while the funds allocated nationwide increased by 
only 16 percent. 

Discretionary funds allocated to Missouri for 
multimodal projects decreased in 2008. This was 
mainly due to a decrease in airport funds. The funds 
allocated to Missouri decreased 19 percent, while the 
funds allocated nationwide increased by 8 percent. 

MoDOT works closely with Missouri's congressional 
delegates to identify specific transportation projects 
that are good candidates for discretionary funds. 



125 



Number of Dollars of Discretionary Funds 
Allocated to Missouri - Highways 

5 




2004 



C 



5-Year Average for Missou ri 
$75 million, 3.8% 



D 



2005 2006 2007 

Federal Fiscal Year 



2008 





f^^m Amount of 




Highway 




Funds 


c 


A Percent Share 


CD 

o 


of Total 


CD 

Q. 


1^ Nationwide 



c 



5-Year Average for Californ icrN 
$253 million, 12.7% J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



6a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Partner with Others to Deliver Transportation Services 



Number of Dollars of Discretionary Funds 
Allocated to Missouri - Multimodal 




2004 



2005 



2006 



2007 



c 



5-Year Average for 



$88 million, 



or Missou ri?^ 
1.6% J 



Federal Fiscal Year 



c 



2008 



^Zl Amount of 
Multimodal 
Funds 

A Percent Share 
of Total 
Nationwide 



5-Year Average for New Yor k 
$752 million, 14.1% 



DESIRED 
TREND 



5 E> 




July 2009 



6a (2) 



Partner with Others to Deliver Transportation Services 



Percent of earmarked dollars that represent MoDOT's high priority 
highway projects-6b 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Todd Grosvenor, Financial Resource Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure shows the percent of earmarked dollars 
that represent MoDOT's high priority highway 
projects. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each January. 
Earmarked dollars are federal funds allocated to 
states for specific highway projects. These funds are 
distributed administratively for programs that do not 
have statutory distribution formulas. States compete 
for these funds, which are above the formula 
apportionments. Resource Management collects this 
information from the Federal Highway 
Administration. MoDOT's high priority highway 
projects are identified in the Federal Priorities list 
that is prepared by Governmental Relations. This list 
is provided to Missouri's congressional delegates. 



Improvement Status: 

Missouri's earmarked dollars for specific highway 
projects increased in 2008. This was mainly due to 
an increase in the funds made available from the 
annual appropriations bill. However, the percent of 
earmarked dollars that represent MoDOT's high 
priority highway projects decreased slightly. Many 
of the earmarked dollars were for projects identified 
on our Federal Priorities list. Over the last five years, 
MoDOT's high priority highway projects received 66 
percent of the earmarked dollars. 

MoDOT works closely with Missouri's congressional 
delegates to identify MoDOT's high priority highway 
projects that are good candidates for earmarked 
dollars. 



Percent of Earmarked Dollars That Represent MoDOT's 
High Priority Highway Projects 

100 

80 



S 60 

o 

CD 40 



20 




2004 2005 2006 2007 

Federal Fiscal Year 



2008 



5-Year Average : 
66% 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



6b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Partner with Others to Deliver Transportation Services 




July 2009 



6b (2) 



Partner with Others to Deliver Transportation Services 



Number of dollars generated through cost-sharing and other 
partnering agreements-6c 

Result Driver: Kevin Keith, Chief Engineer 

Measurement Driver: Todd Grosvenor, Financial Resource Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure shows the number of dollars invested 
by cities, counties, transportation corporations and 
transportation development districts for state highway 
system improvements. It monitors the effectiveness 
of MoDOT's cost-sharing and partnering programs. 
MoDOT allocates $30 million per year for projects 
proposed by entities willing to assist in a project's 
funding that will benefit the state highway system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each October. 
Resource Management collects this data from the 
Statewide Transportation Improvement Program 
(STIP) database. The dollars are shown in the state 
fiscal year in which construction contracts are 
awarded. 



Improvement Status: 

The number of dollars increased significantly in 
fiscal year 2008 due to the timing of the construction 
contract awards for some major cost-share projects. 
Examples include Route 36 in Macon, Marion, 
Monroe and Shelby counties, Route 100 in Franklin 
County and Route 67 in Madison and Wayne 
counties. 

MoDOT markets the cost sharing and partnering 
programs throughout the state to build partnerships 
with entities to pool efforts and resources to 
accomplish what may have previously seemed 
unlikely. 



Number of Dollars Generated Through 
Cost-sharing and Other Partnering Agreements 

250 



200 



</> 


r 




o 


o 


150 


o 


E 




a 


c 


100 

50 





16 





2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



o 



6C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



i 



sj&Sffl 


i 1 ^K 


^^Atfi > ^M W^L V| 


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leverage Transportation to 
Advance economic Development 

Tangible Result Driver - Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 



Transportation is essential to Missouri's economic well-being. It plays a critical role in 
creating jobs and stimulating lasting growth for Missouri. In addition, focusing on ways 
to advance economic development helps MoDOT achieve its mission of promoting a 
prosperous Missouri. 




Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Leverage Transportation To Advance Economic 
Development 



Number of miles of new four-lane corridors completed-7a 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Jay Bledsoe, Transportation System Analysis Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the miles of additional divided 
highways available to the public. Access to a divided 
highway system supports economic development in 
Missouri. One of MoDOT's recent priorities has been 
completion of four-lane corridors in order to connect 
segments of highway where gaps exist. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Projects that create or complete sections of dual- 
divided highways are identified and tracked. 
Completion is defined as the date the project is 
opened to traffic. This is an annual measure updated 
each January. 

Improvement Status: 

More than 60 miles of new four-lane corridors were 
completed during calendar year 2008, primarily on 
U.S. Routes 50, 61 and 65. Progress in 2008 was 



nearly double that of 2007 as projects funded by 
Amendment 3 bonds approved by Missouri voters in 
November 2004 were completed. More than 100 
miles of work to complete four-lane highways are 
included in the current five-year Statewide 
Transportation Improvement Program. 

A MoDOT study completed in 2007 looked at seven 
major economic indicators in non-urbanized counties. 
The indicators are county population, annual wages, 
household income, number of business firms, gross 
sales tax, real estate valuations and per capita 
income. Results showed that counties that have more 
than 15 miles of four-lane highway scored from 9 to 
183 percent higher in these areas than counties with a 
lesser number of divided miles. 



Number of Miles 
of New Four-Lane Corridors Completed 



CD 

n 

E 



120.0 
100.0 
80.0 
60.0 
40.0 
20.0 
0.0 



-6ZA 




2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 




7A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Leverage Transportation To Advance Economic 

Development 



Percent utilization of SIB & STAR loan programs-7b 



Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Brenda Morris, Resource Management Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure shows the percent utilization of 
MoDOT's revolving loan programs, the Missouri 
State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) and the State 
Transportation Assistance Revolving (STAR) 
program. 

The SIB program, which is administered by the 
Missouri Transportation Finance Corporation 
(MTFC), was authorized by federal law in 1995 to 
finance both highway and non-highway projects. 
The STAR program finances non-highway projects 
such as air, water, rail or mass transit facility 
construction, mass transit vehicles and vehicles for 
elderly or handicapped people. STAR funding is 
appropriated by the General Assembly. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each July. The 
percent utilization is the total assets less cash 
available for loans divided by total assets. Resource 
Management collects this data from financial reports 
and a SIB and STAR loans database. 



Improvement Status: 

The percent utilization of the SIB loan program 
increased to 89.1 percent as of June 30, 2009. The 
amount available to loan decreased because: eleven 
entities were approved for loans totaling $23.7 
million; five entities determined they did not need 
their loans totaling $13.2 million; three entities 
reduced their loan amounts by $4.9 million; and 
adjustments were made to the timing of 
disbursements and repayments. 

The percent utilization of the STAR loan program 
decreased to 80.1 percent. The amount available for 
loans increased due to loan repayments and 
investment earnings. The STAR fund has 
approximately $705,000 available for loans. 

Resource Management held partnership development 
training workshops at all districts in fiscal year 2009. 



Percent Utilization of SIB Loan Program 

100 




i 



2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



Total Assets 

Available for 
Loans 
Percent 
Utilization 



DESIRED 
TREND 




II 



July 2009 



7b 



Leverage Transportation To Advance Economic 
Development 



Percent Utilization of STAR Loan Program 

100 




2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



I Total Assets 

] Available for 

Loans 
•Percent 

Utilization 



DESIRED 
TREND 




I 




7b(2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Leverage Transportation To Advance Economic 

Development 



Economic return from transportation investment-7c 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Ben Reeser, Finance Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the economic impact resulting 
from the state's transportation investments. 
Economists have found that transportation 
investments affect employment, personal income and 
economic output. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT works with the Department of Economic 
Development (DED) to perform economic impact analyses 
for the state's transportation investments. The 
analyses are performed using a model called the 
Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI). 
Through these efforts, the department can provide 
state and regional estimates to demonstrate 
employment, income and state benefits related to 
specific projects, corridors and program expenditures. 
This annual measure is updated each October. 

Improvement Status: 

The REMI model results demonstrate the strong link 
between transportation investment and economic 
development. An analysis of the Statewide 
Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) provides 
a summary of economic benefits related to 



transportation investments over the next 20 years. The 
2009-2013 STIP will invest over $4 billion into 
highway and bridge projects across the state. On 
average, these STIP investments will create 
approximately 8,434 new jobs with an average wage of 
$29,373 per job. As a result, average personal income is 
expected to increase by $319.4 million. The 2009-2013 
STIP projects will contribute more than $993 million to 
economic output for the state per year totaling $19.9 
billion over the next 20 years. This equates to a $4.63 
return on every $1 invested in transportation. The 
downward trends shown on the first two annual charts 
are due to decreased STIP investments. The third chart, 
which shows the 20-year benefit ratio for every dollar 
invested, increased compared to the 2008-2012 STIP 
primarily due to adding the New Mississippi River 
Bridge project in St. Louis. MoDOT continues to work 
with DED to conduct economic impact analyses for the 
various transportation investments throughout the state. 
Additional studies can be found online at 
www.modot.mo.gov/newsandinfo/EconomicImpactAna 
lysis.htm. 



Economic Return from Transportation Investment 
Annual Employment Benefit 



15,000 



■g 12,000 
CD 






o 



n 
o 

— > 


6,000 

3,000 

n 




n 
E 




3 

z 






9,285 



8,434 



2007-201 1 STIP 



2008-2012 STIP 



2009-2013 STIP 



DESIRED 
TREND 



£) 






July 2009 



7c 



Leverage Transportation To Advance Economic 
Development 



Economic Return from Transportation Investment 
Annual Personal Income 



500 



400 



</,? 300 
1 = 

a c 200 



100 



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| 


399.2 


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| 


^H 


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| 


332.5 


319.4 




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^H 


^H 


| 


^^^^^H 
^^^^B 


^M 


^^H 


■ 






H^l 




H 



2007-201 1 STIP 2008-2012 STIP 2009-2013 STIP 



DESIRED 
TREND 



£j 



Economic Return from Transportation Investment 
20-Year Benefit Ratio for Every Dollar Invested 



<2 
O 

a 






2007-201 1 STIP 2008-2012 STIP 2009-2013 STIP 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



7c (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



^ 



IB 




Innovative Transportation 
Solutions 

Tangible Result Driver - Mara Campbell, Organizational Results Director 




MoDOT values innovation. The department empowers employees and seeks input from 
stakeholders to generate innovative ideas. Collaboration with staff, academia and indus- 
try makes unique concepts come to life so MoDOT can serve its customers better, faster 
and at less expense to the taxpayer. 




Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



Number and percent of research recommendations implemented-8a 

Result Driver: Mara Campbell, Organizational Results Director 
Measurement Driver: Bill Stone, Organizational Performance Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of completed 
research projects, and the percentage of implemented 
research recommendations. MoDOT realizes the 
importance of supporting innovation and research 
and is driven to provide the department with the latest 
ideas, technologies, and solutions needed to deliver 
the most efficient, safe, and economical 
transportation system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Research projects implemented include any new 
ideas, methods, policies, processes, standards, 
equipment or tools introduced for the purpose of 
improving the department's operation, services, or 
products. For this measure, research projects are 
categorized into two areas: 1) Information and policy 
guidance research, and 2) Technical, product-focused 
research. Both categories are reported as the number 
of completed activities and percent of 
recommendations implemented. Examples of 
information and policy guidance research products 
include determining the economic impact of highway 
construction or smoother pavements, or development 
of freight planning agendas. Technical, product- 
focused research projects examples include 
developing passing lane alternatives, or concrete 
curing specifications. 




For these research products, the definition of 

implemented includes all solutions that have been or 

are being applied. "Percent of research 

recommendations implemented" is determined by 

dividing the number of completed research projects producing 

implementable results by the total number of research 

projects completed during the reporting period. 



MoDOT' s elevated emphasis on strategically focused 
research and its implementation should result in 
better and more economical transportation products 
and services delivered. Data for this measure is 
collected and analyzed annually with updates in the 
July Tracker edition. 

Improvement Status: 

During fiscal year 2009, MoDOT' s research program 
completed 30 total research projects. Seventeen 
projects were categorized as information and policy 
guidance reports and are considered implemented. 
Thirteen projects were categorized as technical, 
product- focused reports. Nine of those projects 
produced implemented results within the department. 
This represents a 69 percent implementation rate for 
the technical report recommendations. 

Organizational Results has made a more concerted 
effort to develop research project work plans that 
have an implementation element included. This is for 
both in-house and contract research. Request for 
proposals (RFPs) for contract research are now 
required to include implementation as one of the 
deliverables for each project. This focus leads to 
more usable solutions and better value. While not all 
research results or solutions can be implemented, 
MoDOT recognizes the importance and value of 
conducting a research program driven to make a 
difference. 

Within the last year, Organizational Results has 
implemented a project- tracking tool, which has 
brought a better mechanism to track the progress of 
projects and their implementation. 



8a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



Number and Percent of Research 
Recommendations Implemented 



100 



^ 80 

* 

c 

r 60 -h 

c 

<D 

O 40+H 

© 

°" 20 4 





'J~\ 



79 
(15) 



1 m J n n 



62 
(8) 



67 
(8) 



69 |- 
(9) 



■ Information Research 
□ Technology Research 



2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



^(n) Indicates the number of research recommendations implemented 




July 2009 



8a (2) 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



Number of external awards received-8b 

Result Driver: Mara Campbell, Organizational Results Director 
Measurement Driver: Bill Stone, Organizational Performance Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of external awards 
received by the department. These awards display 
the department's dedication and efforts towards 
efficiency, innovation and quality throughout the 
organization. This information enables the 
department to measure progress and encourage 
further participation in award programs. It also 
provides opportunities for the department to increase 
public awareness of department activities. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Each district and division office tracks the awards 
presented to the department by external 
organizations. This includes all awards presented to 
individuals, teams, districts, divisions and MoDOT as 
a whole. Data for this measure is updated quarterly. 



Improvement Status: 

In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, MoDOT 
received 25 awards. Fourteen of those awards 
recognized MoDOT for excellence in communicating 
with the citizens of Missouri. KCICON received two 
of those awards, including APEX - Awards for 
Publication Excellence, PR, Public Information & 
Public Service Campaigns "Ready. . .Set. . . 
Construction! Preparing Kansas Citians for a Major 
Highway Project." 

MoDOT continues to enter various competitions to 
have its work judged against the efforts of other 
organizations. 



CD 

n 

E 

3 



70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




Number of External Awards Received 









^B 




52 


A 




49 




47 





2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



8b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



Percent of best practices by implementation status-8c 

Result Driver: Mara Campbell, Organizational Results Director 
Measurement Driver: Bill Stone, Organizational Performance Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the percent of best practices 
implemented within MoDOT. Best practices show 
how MoDOT employees are applying innovation to 
improve daily operations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT uses a simple five-question submission form 
for employees to share how they have improved the 
ways of accomplishing daily work. Submissions are 
evaluated and verified by managerial and technical 
staff. Those submissions approved as best practices 
are shared with MoDOT employees through online 
and printed publications. Every six months, division 
and district managers report best practice 
implementation status. This measure will have 
updates in the July and January Tracker editions. 

Improvement Status: 

During fiscal year 2009, MoDOT' s Solutions at 
Work has verified and shared 10 best practices with 
department employees. Seven of those best practices 
have been shared within the past 30 days and will be 
reported in the next survey cycle in January 2010. 
Similarly six best practices from fiscal year 2008 are 



included in this survey cycle. Overall, 80 percent of 
the best practices have been fully implemented with 
15 percent partially implemented and 5 percent still 
under review. With 95 percent of best practices 
partially or fully implemented, MoDOT is 
aggressively taking advantage of best practices. The 
15 percent partially implemented is primarily due to a 
delay in securing a fabrication contract on two of the 
items. The implementation rate for the fiscal year is 
nearly the same as the previous year with a 
significant reduction in the percent of best practices 
still being reviewed. This is a clear indication that 
implementation of approved best practices has 
become a priority. Monthly statewide 
videoconferences to discuss evaluations and 
implementation issues should continue to drive 
implementation numbers upward. While many of 
these 10 best practices are tools and equipment 
modifications to make work faster and safer, some 
actual savings were realized. Most notably the 
department saved more than $2 million through a 
process to modify low-water crossings and bank the 
stream mitigation credits for other projects. 



Percent of Best Practices by 
Implementation Status 




■ Under Review 
□ Partial 

■ Full 



2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 






DESIRED 
TREND 



£j 



July 2009 



8c 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



0) 

o 



Percent of Implementation by Best Practice 
Year-to-Date, Fiscal Year 2009* 



STIP Map Consolidation 

Stream Mitigation Bank 

Shouldering Machine 

Mud Pump T-Handle 



D Remote Wake-Up for Computers 



0) 

CO 



Concrete Saw Wheels 

Breakaway Sign Tool 

Foot Pedal for Hydraulic Drivers 

Sign Mounting System 



1 1 1 1 1 






rH 


















— U 








^KT^ 










m 










LU 










EU 


i i i i 1 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 

Percent 



*Best practices too recent to include in this survey cycle include: a bridge deck repair clamp, a steel plate transport 
trailer, a string trimmer fix, a guardrail pusher, a hitch-haul ramp, a mud jack pipe, and an employee concerns 



database. 




8C (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



Number of dollars saved by increasing MoDOT's productivity-8d 

Result Driver: Mara Campbell, Organizational Results Director 
Measurement Driver: Jen Harper, Organizational Performance Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure enables MoDOT to assess its 
productivity by tracking cost savings indicative of 
practical design, value engineering, Performance Plus 
and good engineering judgment. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The cost-saving methods used by MoDOT are so 
broad that this measure focuses on savings measured 
through the Performance Plus program. The 
Construction Cost Savings and the Project Scoping 
and Estimating incentives are verified quarterly, 
while the Injury Reduction incentive is verified on a 
semi-annual basis. The number of dollars saved is 
calculated for each of the incentives. The amount 
paid out to employees is no longer subtracted from 
the reported savings in order to report the data in a 
timely manner. Note that the Construction Cost 
Savings incentive is now calculated in the same 
manner as the Project Scoping and Estimating and 
the Injury Reduction incentives, that is, calculations 
are based on all of the project offices/districts 
whether or not they qualified. The historical data was 
recalculated to reflect these changes. For the 
Construction Cost Savings incentive and the Project 
Scoping and Estimating incentive, savings are 
reported in the same quarter as the data is measured. 



For the Injury Reduction incentive, data is reported in 
the quarter the incentives are paid out to the 
employees due to a processing lag. For the 
Construction Cost Savings and Project Estimating 
and Scoping incentives, the measurement data 
reflects April to June FY 2009. For the Injury 
Reduction incentive, the data reflects July through 
December FY 2009. Data for this measure is updated 
quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

For the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, MoDOT 
saved $9.4 million through the Construction Cost 
Savings incentive. For fiscal year 2009, $11.6 
million was saved. 

In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, an additional 
$34.5 million was saved through the Project Scoping 
and Estimating incentive. For fiscal year 2009, 
$123.9 million was saved. 

Data for the Injury Reduction Incentive was not 
updated for this quarter. This incentive will be 
discontinued after the January through June 2009 
measurement period. The last six months of data will 
be reported in the October TRACKER. 



Number of Dollars Saved by 

Increasing MoDOT's Productivity 

Construction Cost Savings Incentive 

(in millions) 



20 



S2 

£ io 

o 

a 



^T"^ 



2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



July 2009 



8d 



Innovative Transportation Solutions 



200 

<2 150 
O 

=5 100 
o 

50 



Number of Dollars Saved by 

Increasing MoDOT's Productivity 

Project Scoping & Estimating Incentive 

(in millions) 



















123.9 

















DESIRED 
TREND 



2008 



2009 



Fiscal Year 



Note: The desired trend in the Project Scoping and Estimating Incentive is to keep the 
variance between the STIP estimate and low bid amount to percent. 



Number of Dollars Saved by 

Increasing MoDOT's Productivity 

Injury Reduction Incentive 

Based on Payout Period 

(in thousands) 



O 

a 



1,500 

1,000 

500 



-500 

-1,000 





1,684.2 














-285.3 




1 1 









2008 



2009 



Fiscal Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



8d(2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



fast projects that are of 
Great value 

Tangible Result Driver - Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 



MoDOT customers expect that transportation projects be completed quickly and provide 
major improvements for travelers. MoDOT will honor project commitments because it 
believes in integrity. 




Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of programmed project cost as compared to final project cost-9a 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Renate Wilkinson, Planning and Programming Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure determines how close MoDOT's total 
project completion costs are to the programmed 
costs. The programmed cost is considered the project 
budget. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT determines the completed project costs and 
compares them to the programmed costs. The 
completed project costs are reported during the fiscal 
year in which the project is completed. 

Project costs include design, right of way purchases, 
utilities, construction, inspection and other 
miscellaneous costs. The programmed cost is based 
on the amount included in the most recently approved 
Statewide Transportation Improvement Program. 
Completed costs include actual expenditures. The 
costs do not include those that might result from any 
legal claims, which are rare occurrences, regarding 
the projects after they are completed. Positive 




numbers indicate the final (completed) cost was 
higher than the programmed cost. 

This is an annual measure updated each quarter. In 
November of each year, this data is provided to the 
Missouri Legislature through the Report to the Joint 
Committee on Transportation Oversight. 

Improvement Status: 

As of June 30, 2009, for fiscal year 2009, a total of 
411 projects were completed at a cost of $1,593 
billion. This represents a deviation of 0.31 percent or 
$5 million more than the programmed cost of $1,588 
billion. The final fiscal year 2009 value will be 
presented in the next Tracker. There may be projects 
that have adjustments pending, which could cause a 
slight change in the values presented here. 

For fiscal year 2008, the final value was 543 projects 
completed at a cost of $1.2463 billion. This 
represents a deviation of -2.27 percent or $29 million 
less than the programmed cost of $1.2753 billion. 

District construction budgets are adjusted based on 
variation from programmed costs. The ideal status is 
no deviation in the programmed vs. final project cost, 
or percent. For projects completed in the five-year 
period from 2004 to 2008, final costs of $5,546 
billion were within 0.69 percent of programmed 
costs, or $38.5 million less than the programmed cost 
of $5,585 billion. 

While a number of states track construction costs, 
few provide data for total project costs. Fewer still 
compare programmed total project costs to final total 
project cost. The following graph shows how 
MoDOT performance compares with neighboring 
Nebraska. In 2004, the performance of both states 
was nearly the same. In 2007, both states were 
within 5 percent of each other. In other years, it 
varied close to 10 percent. Data for Nebraska is 
updated annually. 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of Programmed Project Cost 
as Compared to Final Project Cost 



c 

CD 

O 

»*- 

<D 

a. 



00 
00 
00 
00 



7.23 



00 — 
00 



00 
00 



□ 



5.42 



3.98 



7.71 




-2.84 



■^MO 
□ NE 



DESIRED 
TREND 






2004 2005 2006 2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 




Positive numbers indicate the final (completed) cost was higher than the programmed cost. 
Data from Nebraska Department of Roads, one-year schedule of highway improvement projects. 




July 2009 



9a(2) 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Average number of years it takes to go from the programmed 
commitment in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program to 
construction completion-9b 



Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Machelle Watkins, Transportation Planning Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure monitors how quickly projects go from 
the programmed commitment to fiscal closure of a 
construction project. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT compares how long it takes from when the 
project is added to the Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP) to when the project is 
completed. Project completion is defined as fiscal 
closure, which happens after the visible construction 
work has been completed. Data is categorized by the 
type of work and distinguishes between design and 
construction stages. This is an annual measure and 
data is updated in October. 

Improvement Status: 

In general, resurfacing and safety projects take the 
least amount of time to develop and complete, around 
two to three years. New or improved bridge projects 
take more time, around five years. New or expanded 
highways take yet more time, from seven to 10 years. 
Major bridge projects take the most time, from seven 
to 12 years to develop and complete. 



From 2006 to 2007, design time for resurfacing 
projects decreased slightly to 0.7 years. Design time 
for safety projects increased slightly to 1.3 years. 
Design time for new or improved bridges also 
increased slightly to 2.9 years. The design time 
average for new or expanded highways increased 
slightly to 3.9 years. The design time for major 
bridges decreased from 4.3 years to 1.5 years. Data 
samples for major bridges are usually small, which 
allows for one to two projects to affect the averages 
that are reported. 

Construction times from 2006 to 2007 increased for 
resurfacing, safety, new or improved bridge projects 
and major bridges to 1.7, 2.0, 1.9 and 5.1 years 
respectively. MoDOT makes an effort to fiscally 
close completed construction projects that are 
inactive. Therefore, an increase in the average 
construction time is expected. New or expanded 
highways saw a decrease to 3.7 years. 




9b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That are of Great Value 



Average Number of Years it Takes to Go from the 

Programmed Commitment in the STIP 

to Construction Completion 

Resurfacing Projects 



5.00 

O 4.00 
<D 

% 3.00 

J> 2.00 

E 

3 1.00 



0.00 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 



3.9 


- 


1.2 

I 


3.0 




2.2 

1.4 


2.1 j 
1.3 


2.4 
1.7 — 

GH_ 



D Award Date 
Construction 
Completion 

■ Programmed 
Commitment to 
Award 



ite to j 

ion 

on 



DESIRED 
TREND 




Average Number of Years it Takes to Go from the 

Programmed Commitment in the STIP 

to Construction Completion 

Safety Projects 



4.00 



O 3.00 
<D 

> 

2 2.00 
© 

•D 1.00 



0.00 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



35 
r^n 3.3 


1.7 


2.8 


2.0 — 


2.3 


2.6 
1.5 




1.7 








1.4 












1 


I 








■■■ 








I 




■ 






1 





D Award Date to 
Construction 
Completion 

■ Programmed 
Commitment to 
Award 



2007 



DESIRED 
TREND 




July 2009 



9B(2) 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Average Number of Years it Takes to Go from the 

Programmed Commitment in the STIP 

to Construction Completion 

New/Improved Bridge 



6.00 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 




D Award Date to 
Construction 
Completion 

■ Programmed 
Commitment 
to Award 



DESIRED 
TREND 




Average Number of Years it Takes to Go from the 

Programmed Commitment in the STIP 

to Construction Completion 

New/Expanded Highway 



10.00 



<2 8.00 

a 

<D 

£ 6.00 



E 



4.00 



2.00 



0.00 



2003 



2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 




2007 



□ Award Date to 
Construction 
Completion 

■ Programmed 
Commitment 
to Award 



DESIRED 
TREND 




J 



9b(3) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Average Number of Years it Takes to Go from the 

Programmed Commitment in the STIP 

to Construction Completion 

Major Bridge 



D 

> 



n 

E 

3 



15.00 
12.00 

9.00 

6.00 ■ 

3.00 

0.00 





11.9 




3.1 




I 




6.8 

1 1 




7.8 
3.5 

1 


6.6 








7 






5.1 






_ 


„ 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 



□ Award Date to 
Construction 
Completion 

■ Programmed 
Commitment t 
Award 



DESIRED 
TREND 





July 2009 



9b (4) 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of projects completed within programmed amount-9c 



Results Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Dave Ahlvers, State Construction & Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The measure tracks the percentage of projects 
completed within the programmed amount. It 
includes separate categories for projects over and 
under one million dollars. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The completed project cost is compared to the 
estimated cost for each project. The percentage of 
projects completed within the estimated cost is 
gathered from across the state. 

Project costs include design, right-of-way purchases, 
utilities, construction payments, inspection and other 
miscellaneous costs. 

This is an annual measure updated each quarter. 



Improvement Status: 

MoDOT would like to see all projects completed within 
the programmed amount. The goal is to deliver projects 
at the programmed amount, allowing the greatest 
number of projects to be built with the funding 
available. MoDOT' s data indicates that there is a great 
deal of deviation among individual projects with half 
over and half under budget. In fiscal year 2009, 60 
percent of projects programmed over $1 million were 
completed within the budgeted amount, while 54 
percent of projects under $1 million came in at or 
below budget. Emphasis has been placed on scoping 
projects and developing estimates that represent the true 
cost of delivering the projects. MoDOT is striving to 
deliver quality projects cheaper by using practical 
design and by encouraging the use of value 
engineering. 



Percent of Projects Completed within 
Programmed Amount 




Over$lM 
□ Under $1M 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



9C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



100 

80 



S 60 

o 

© 40 



20 




Percent of Projects Completed within 

Programmed Amount 

Distribution of Projects by Amount of Variance 

Fiscal Year 2009 




<-io% 



-10%<>10% 

Variance 



>io% 



■ Over$lM 
□ Under $1M 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 






J 



Percent of Projects Completed within 

Programmed Amount 

Number of Projects by Amount 




2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



■ Over$lM 
n Under $1M 



July 2009 



9c (2) 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of projects completed on time-9d 

Results Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Dave Ahlvers, State Construction & Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the percentage of projects 
completed by the commitment date established in the 
contract. Adjustments to the completion date are 
made when additional work is required or for unusual 
weather occurrences. It indicates MoDOT's ability to 
complete projects by the agreed upon date. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The project manager will establish project 
completion dates for each project. They are 
documented in MoDOT's SiteManager and STIP 
databases, and become part of the Plans, 
Specifications & Estimates submittal. The actual 
completion date is documented by the resident 
engineer and placed in MoDOT's project 
management system. 



This is an annual measure updated each quarter. 

Improvement Status: 

The results indicate that 93 percent of projects 
completed in fiscal year 2009 have been on time. 
MoDOT has focused on reducing the number of days 
available for construction in order to reduce 
congestion and inconvenience to the traveling public, 
while stressing the importance of completing projects 
on time. To achieve timely completion of 
improvement projects, an emphasis has been placed 
on reviewing construction schedules and assessing 
liquidated damages. 



Percent of Projects Completed on Time 




2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



9d 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of change for finalized contracts-9e 

Results Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Dave Ahlvers, State Construction & Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The measure tracks the percentage difference of total 
construction payouts to the original contract award 
amounts. This indicates how many changes are made 
on projects after they are awarded to the contractor. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Contractor payments are generated through 
MoDOT's SiteManager database and processed in 
the financial management system for payment. 
Change orders document the underrun/overrun of the 
original contract. 

This is an annual measure updated each quarter. 



Improvements Status: 

MoDOT's performance of 1.1 percent in fiscal year 
2009 is below the target of two percent. The overall 
improvement is a result of a strong emphasis placed 
on constructing projects within budget, the use of 
practical design and value engineering. By limiting 
overruns on contracts, MoDOT can deliver more 
projects, leading to an overall improvement of the 
entire highway system. The Performance Plus 
employee incentive program has placed additional 
emphasis on completion of projects within budget. 



Percent of Change for Finalized Contracts 
Total Contractor Payment vs. Award Amount 







2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



© 



July 2009 



9e 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Average construction cost per day by contract type-9f 

Results Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Dave Ahlvers, State Construction & Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the cost per day for project 
completion to determine the impact to the traveling 
public, enabling MoDOT to better manage project 
completion needs. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This information is gathered by extracting the actual 
time used for construction from the summary of days 
used in the SiteManager database and dividing it by 
the total costs of the project. 

The measurement groups construction contracts into 
three categories: 

> WD working day contracts 

> CD calendar day contracts and; 

> A + B or innovative contracts that provide 
incentive/disincentives to the contractor for 
early completion. 



This is an annual measure updated each quarter. 

Improvement Status: 

The greater use of A+B and calendar-day contracts 
resulted in a larger amount paid per calendar day in 
the first three quarters of fiscal year 2009. The 1-64 
and kcICON Design-Build projects are included in 
the A+B category. MoDOT' s strategy of utilizing 
innovative contracting techniques and Design-Build 
projects has resulted in faster contract completion and 
fewer delays to the traveling public. Contract types 
are reviewed to make a determination of the most 
effective use of resources for timely completion of 
projects. 






Average Construction Cost Per Day by Contract Type 



80,000 



60,000 



v> 



= 40,000 
O 

a 



20,000 




I 



IT 




■ I 
CO 



CM 



oo 
oo 



■ Working Day 
□ Calendar Day 

■ A+B 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



£> 



9f 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Average Construction Cost Per Day by Contract Type 

All Contract Types 



20,000 
16,000 



<2 12,000 
O 

Q 8,000 



4,000 



17,971. 



15,258 



14,050 

4- 



13,738 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



600 

500 

_ 400 

<D 

A 

£ 300 

3 

Z 200 

100 





Average Construction Cost Per Day by Contract Type 

Number of Active Contracts 



570 □ 



2006 



□ 570 



555 



488 



□ 




2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



1 



^•Working Day 
□ Calendar Day 



DESIRED 
TREND 



(^ 






July 2009 



9F(2) 



Fast Projects that Are of Great Value 



Unit cost of construction expenditures-9g 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Kenneth Voss, Bidding and Contract Services Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks how MoDOT projects provide 
great value by comparing the cost of major items of 
work for MoDOT projects to other state DOTs. 
MoDOT customers should be able to gain an 
understanding of what it costs for a DOT to install an 
item of work. While value should not be defined as 
MoDOT prices per unit being the lowest as compared 
to other DOTs, prices can be compared keeping in 
mind that labor rates, material availability and 
general project conditions such as urban vs. rural will 
vary from state to state. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Value in this measure has simply been related back to 
dollars per unit of measure. MoDOT staff categorizes 
raw data from an outside vendor for the unit cost 
from other states. FHWA is the source for 
determining the "lowest in the U.S." FHWA is 
currently retooling its method of determining state 
price indexes. This is a success for DOTs since 
FHWA's old method produced numerous pieces of 
erroneous data. Due to the data discrepancies the 
lowest in the country was selected from the best of 
what was available and the overall index of some of 



the surrounding states is not reported. This is an 
annual measure updated each January. 

Improvement Status: 

Excellent competition in the past year has enabled 
MoDOT to realize almost a seven percent reduction 
in unit prices for bridge construction - the second 
largest percentage decrease in this area among 
Missouri's surrounding states. MoDOT was also 
below the surrounding states average increase in unit 
prices for concrete and asphalt paving. The 21 
percent increase in unit prices for asphalt paving is 
due to a spike in the cost of asphalt binder. In the past 
year, MoDOT had an average of more than 4.8 
bidders per proposal as compared to fewer than 3.5 
bidders per proposal just a couple of years ago. 
Projects over $20 million are receiving an average of 
more than six bids per proposal which can be 
attributed to smaller programs in surrounding states 
and MoDOT' s efforts to "balance" the bid openings 
by spreading out the big jobs in different months. 
MoDOT has also expanded the use of alternate 
technical concepts that give bidders and designers 
more flexibility to deliver the best value for every 
dollar spent. 



Unit Cost of Construction Expenditures 
Concrete Pavement 
9" Equivalent Square Yard 




□ 

V I I 



2006 
2007 
2008. 



o 


CD 


>. 


CO 


™ 


o 


E 
o 


O 

CO 
CO 


a 


O 

CO 

C 


o 

CO 


CO 

o 


.c 


CD 




o 


CO 




o 
O 


C 

c 

0) 

1— 


C 
0) 


State 


2 


CD 

z 



o 
o 



CO 

O 

CO 

C 
O 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



* Lowest for surrounding states 



9g 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects that Are of Great Value 



o 
o 



Unit Cost of Construction Expenditures 
Asphalt Price per Ton 




^^^ 



— g" 5 



I 



■ 2006 
□ 2007 

■ 2008 



o 

E 
o 

.c 

O 

o 



a 

D 
C 

2 



D 
to 

C 

D 



D 

CO 

O 

a— 

ID 
CD 



o 
o 



o 

CO 
CO 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 






State 



Lowest for surrounding states 



Unit Cost of Construction Expenditures 
Soil Excavation per Cubic Yard 




■ 2006 
□ 2007 

■ 2008. 



CO 

O 

CO 

C 
D 



a 

C 

a> 



o 

E 
o 

D 

o 



CD 


o 


■c 


CD 


^ 


D 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


2 


CO 


O 


CO 


C 

c 


id 

CD 


s 


0) 


Z 





CO 

O 

CO 

C 



State 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



* Lowest for surrounding states 

Footnote for the charts above: 

Source data for states other than Missouri from Oman Systems Bid Tabs Professional latest data available as of 

January 2009. Items include common excavation items paid for by the cubic yard. Missouri data from MoDOT bid 

history. 



July 2009 



9G(2) 



Fast Projects that Are of Great Value 



Unit Cost of Construction Expenditures 
FHWA Bridge Cost per Square Foot 




■ 2005 
□ 2006 

■ 2007 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



State 



*Lowest in U.S. 

Source data from FHWA memo "Bridge Construction Unit Cost" dated January 2009. FHWA does not publish an 

average U.S. cost per square foot for bridges. 




9G(3) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Annual dollar amount saved by implementing value engineering-9h 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Joe Jones, Engineering Policy Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the amount of money MoDOT 
saves by implementing value engineering proposals. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Value Engineering has saved MoDOT over $450 
million since 1988. VE achieves savings at the design 
phase and at the construction phase of a project. VE 
utilizes a team approach to refine the purpose and 
need and then develop innovative and creative ideas, 
which result in project savings while optimizing 
project performance. The VE team is usually 
independent from the project core team and includes 
participants from various disciplines both from 
within and outside of MoDOT. VE studies are done 
on projects at all stages of development, from the 
concept stage to final design and during construction. 

Traditionally, VE studies during the design phase of a 
project were a five-day formal event that required a 
tremendous amount of organization and facilitation. 
As a result, VE studies were only done on the 
significant few projects where large savings could be 
realized. In an effort to increase the number of VE 
studies being done and thus increase the potential for 
cost savings, the format of the study has been revised 
to be more flexible. VE studies now match the size 
and needs of the project, ranging from four hours to 
five days. This change has increased the number of 
VE studies being done during the design phase of the 
projects. 



VE savings are reported annually to the Federal 
Highway Administration by each state and the 
national results are available for Federal Fiscal Year 
2008. For design phase savings, Florida is the best in 
the nation showing $480 million implemented. For 
construction phase savings, Rhode Island is the best 
in the nation showing $15 million implemented. 
When compared to states surrounding Missouri, 
Kentucky reported $34 million saved during design 
and Illinois reported $5.98 million saved during 
construction. Direct comparison to other states is 
challenging because of differences in construction 
program size and project development processes. 

This is an annual measure using a federal fiscal year, 
running from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30. Annual updates are 
reported in the October Tracker edition, however the 
year-to-date total for the current fiscal year is 
included in each of the other editions. 

Improvement Status: 

In 2008, MoDOT design savings from VE studies 
were $96.1 million, a 94 percent increase from 2007. 
So far, for 2009, design savings are $23.5 million. 

In 2008, MoDOT construction savings from VE 
Change Proposals were $6.06 million, a 45 percent 
increase over the previous year, and 73 out of 93 
proposals submitted were approved. As of the third 
quarter of federal fiscal year 2009, MoDOT 
construction savings from VECP are $2.42 million 
and 61 out of 74 proposals submitted were approved. 




July 2009 



9h 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Annual Dollar Amount Saved bylmplementing Value Engineering 

Design Phase 

Washington 
1.112 

D Florida N ew Jersey F '° rida 

414 Newjersey 4 g Q 

a 3 g □ 



100 

W 80 
«2 c 

gi 60 

Q £ 40 

20 





2005 



Kentucky 



61 



Kentucky 

s— 



I H I 



Kentucky 
34 





Missouri 



D Best In The 
Nation 

A Best of 
Surrounding 
States 



2006 2007 2008 

Federal Fiscal Year 



YTD 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



Annual Dollar Amount Saved by Implementing Value Engineering 

Construction Phase 



|l 4 

si 3 



Georgia 
5.6 



a 



Michigan 
1.6 



2005 



Virginia 
6.71 



□ 



Arkansas 




Florida 



5.25 

□ 




Rhode Island 
15.00 

a 

Illinois 
5.98 



2006 2007 2008 

Federal Fiscal Year 



YTD 2009 




I Missouri 






D Best In The 
Nation 

A Best of 

Surrounding 
States 



DESIRED 
TREND 



9H(2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of customers who feel completed projects are the right 
transportation solutions-9i 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Kathy Harvey, State Design Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure provides information regarding the 
public's perception of MoDOT's performance in 
providing the right transportation solutions. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data for this measure is collected through an annual 
survey that is sent to users of projects that were 
completed and opened to traffic within the previous 
year. The goal is for the MoDOT districts to identify 
30 projects - three per district - in three different 
categories (large - major route listed as or funded 
through major project dollars; medium - district- wide 
importance; and small - only local significance). 

A sample of residents is drawn from zip code areas 
adjoining the roadway where the project was recently 
completed. The samples have included 400 addresses 
per project areas for a total of 12,000 surveys in 2006 
and 2008, and 11,600 in 2007 (29 projects). Nearly 
2,900 surveys were returned in the initial survey, 
more than 2,300 were returned in 2007, and 2,697 
were returned in the most recent survey. 

This measure is reported annually in January. 
Districts will continue to identify one project in each 
of the three categories to be surveyed, although it is 



recognized that it might not be possible for every 
district to have three projects that meet the criteria 
each year. 

Improvement Status: 

Project- specific questions were asked of MoDOT 
customers and each showed a high level of 
satisfaction with important goals such as safety, 
convenience, less congestion, handles traffic 
efficiently, easy to navigate, easy to understand and 
well marked. 

The overall results show that most Missourians are 
very satisfied with both the local project and 
generally believe that MoDOT provides the right 
transportation solutions. 92.8 percent of the 
respondents were either "very" or "fairly" familiar 
with the project roadway. 69.2 percent of the 
respondents were regular users of the affected 
roadway. The majority of respondents thought that 
the project made the roadway safer (95.4 percent), 
more convenient (91.2 percent), less congested (82.7 
percent), easier to drive (94.2 percent), better marked 
(92.3 percent) and was the right transportation 
solution (94.7 percent). 




July 2009 



9i 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of Customers Who Feel Completed Projects 
Are The Right Transportation Solutions 

100 

80 



C 60 
<D 

a 

I 40 



20 




H 1 

1 70.2 1 






23.7 



1.8 2.9 1.7 

i i 



2.7 3.2 3.7 

i I ~~l 



Not at all Not really Somewhat 

Response 




Very much 



■ 2006 
D 2007 



\D2008/ 



DESIRED 
TREND 



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91 (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



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Environmentally responsible 

Tangible Result Driver - Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 



MoDOT takes great pride in being a good steward of the environment, both in the 
construction and operation of Missouri's transportation system and in the manner in 
which its employees complete their daily work. The department strives to protect, con- 
serve, restore and enhance the environment while it plans, designs, builds, maintains 
and operates a complex transportation infrastructure. 




4\ 



■ 






Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Environmentally Responsible 



Percent of projects completed without environmental violation- 10a 



Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Kathy Harvey, State Design Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks environmental violations. 
MoDOT projects must comply with several 
environmental laws and regulations. To be in 
compliance, MoDOT makes commitments 
throughout the project development process that must 
be carried forward during construction and 
maintenance. In addition, the various permits 
obtained for projects also contain specific 
requirements for compliance. MoDOT must also 
comply with the environmental laws and regulations 
as it conducts its daily work in all areas of the 
organization. 

If a violation is noted, it can result in either a Letter 
of Warning (LOW) or a Notice of Violation (NOV) 
to MoDOT. Letters of Warning can also be received 
as simply that, a warning to MoDOT of a special 
circumstance to be aware of, or for a situation that 
needs to be monitored so that a violation does not 
occur. For that reason, LOWs never will be 
eliminated but should be kept to a minimum. 
However, it is unacceptable to the department to have 
an NOV. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Both LOWs and NOVs are written correspondence to 
MoDOT or MoDOT' s contractors from regulatory 
agencies, which are tracked in a MoDOT database by 
location or project number, as appropriate. Where 
tracked by project, the project with violations 
received may span several years. The first chart is 
based on a calendar year of construction projects 
reported to be completed during that year and the 
number of violations received on those projects over 
the life of the project. The second chart is a report by 
calendar year of the LOWs and NOVs received by 
the department for any activity and the data is 
updated quarterly. 



Improvement Status: 

The percentage of projects completed without 
environmental violation shows a relatively level trend 
line for the past five years. In 2008, MoDOT received 
two NOVs and four LOWs, significantly reducing the 
number of both NOVs and LOWs from the previous 
two years. 

First quarter 2009 - MoDOT received one 
LOW and zero NOVs. The LOW was for 
discharge concerns at a MoDOT salt storage 
facility. 

Second quarter 2009 - MoDOT received 
one NOV and two LOWs. The NOV was 
for hazardous waste issues at one of our 
maintenance facilities. One LOW was for 
failure to submit a discharge monitoring 
report and the other was related to best 
management practices for erosion and 
sediment control on a construction project. 




IOa 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Environmentally Responsible 



1 



Percent of Projects Completed without 
Environmental Violation 



100 




2004 



2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



■ w/oLOW 

Dw/o NOV 

■ Total 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



E 



10 
9 
8 
7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 




Number of LOWs & NOVs 



3 



i 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 YTD 2009 

Calendar Year 



■ LOW 

a nov 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Note: There is no benchmark data presented with this measure. MoDOT has a zero-tolerance policy toward NOVs, 
but recognizes LOWs will never be eliminated due to their nature. Therefore, regardless of what other states are doing, 
MoDOT' s desired results are zero NOVs, because NOVs are usually violations of law and state statute. 



J 



July 2009 



1 Oa (2) 



Environmentally Responsible 



Number of projects MoDOT protects sensitive species or restores 
habitat- 10b 



Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Gayle Unruh, Environmental & Historic Preservation Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

Missouri is home to many rare species of plants and 
animals, some of which are on the federal endangered 
species list. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 
prohibits harm or harassment of these species. 
Avoiding or minimizing harm to these species and 
protecting or restoring their habitat is a fundamental 
obligation of this organization. Avoidance and/or 
protection are the first goals of MoDOT' s efforts, but 
in circumstances where avoidance cannot be 
achieved, restoration of habitat is a minimum 
acceptable result. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

On all MoDOT projects, the department investigates 
and informs the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(USFWS) of any activity in the vicinity of a known 
threatened or endangered species or critical habitat. 
Through consultation with USFWS, MoDOT has the 
data to report on this measure. Because this measure 
focuses on projects that protect or restore sensitive 
habitats that could not initially be avoided, most 
MoDOT projects are not included in this data. This 
measure is tracked by calendar year with quarterly 
updates. Annual data are finalized and shown in the 



January Tracker. There is no desired trend with this 
measure. The number reported will fluctuate 
depending on the size of MoDOT' s construction 
program each year, type of projects being 
constructed, location and the ability to make 
adjustments to avoid impacts on sensitive species or 
their habitat. There are occasionally more than one 
species on a project. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT has protected sensitive species or restored 
their habitat on seven projects in the first half of this 
calendar year. These species and habitats include the 
eastern hellbender (one project), Niangua darter (one 
project) and bird nests on bridges (five projects). 
Under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, birds are 
protected from deliberate harassment, collection or 
nest destruction. In cases where colonies of swallows 
build their nests on the department's bridges, 
MoDOT can either keep birds from building nests on 
bridges or limit maintenance work such as paint 
blasting and repainting to times outside of the nesting 
season. 



Number of Projects MoDOT Protects Sensitive 
Species or Restores Habitat 



0) 

n 

E 



20 

15 

10 

5 





I d r — 

— — — I I 



DESIRED 
TREND 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



YTD 2009 




10b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Environmentally Responsible 



Ratio of acres of wetlands created compared to the number of acres 
of wetlands impacted- 10c 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Gayle Unruh, Environmental & Historic Preservation Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

Wetlands are a valuable resource in Missouri, having 
beneficial functions such as wildlife habitat, flood 
storage and water quality improvement. In addition to 
these benefits, it is required in the Clean Water Act that 
impacts to wetlands are avoided, minimized or that 
wetlands are recreated when a wetland is destroyed 
during a transportation project. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data for this measure is calculated by comparing 
acres of project impacts taken from Clean Water Act 
permits to acres of wetland constructed, as shown in 
roadway design plans or by calculating the actual 
wetland areas recreated by MoDOT, or wetland 
mitigation purchased from a commercial wetland 
bank. Impacts may occur in a different year from the 
mitigation; so for the purposes of this measure, the 
timeframe for the reporting is when the mitigation 
construction is complete based on a calendar year. 
The national goal set by the FHWA for recreating 
wetland is to construct 1.5 acres of wetland for every 
1.0 acre of wetland impacted. Recreating wetlands at 
this ratio helps to offset the beneficial functions lost 
during the time it takes for a wetland to develop. This 
measure helps ensure that MoDOT is doing its part to 
maintain wetlands in Missouri. 



Since this measure is also tracked by FHWA for the 
nation, MoDOT contacted state DOTs that are 
successful at meeting the 1.5-to-l ratio. Most of the 
states queried said that the biggest factor in meeting 
the ratio is in the use of wetland mitigation banks. 
They had greater control over achieving their target 
ratios and more ecologically successful wetland 
mitigation. MoDOT has a statewide umbrella wetland 
mitigation banking agreement. This measure is 
tracked by calendar year with quarterly updates. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT had seven projects with wetland impacts and 
mitigation in the first half of calendar year 2009. 
Impacts to 3.04 acres of wetland resulted in 4.58 
acres of mitigation, which is a ratio of 1.5 to 1. This 
ratio is consistent with the national goal of 1.5 to 1. 
MoDOT recently made application to the Corps of 
Engineers to build its fourth bank, the North Fork 
Spring River Mitigation Bank, in Barton County. 
MoDOT has operating wetland mitigation banks 
located in the Kansas City, Central and Southeast 
Districts. 






Ratio of Acres of Wetlands Created Compared to 
the Number of Acres of Wetlands Impacted 

10 
8 
6 
4 
2 





JL5_ 



0.0 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



National 
Goal: 
1.5:1 



DESIRED 
TREND 



© 



July 2009 



10c 



Environmentally Responsible 



Percent of Missouri's clean air days-lOd 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Eric Curtit, Long-Range Transportation Planning Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

Vehicle emissions are a significant contributor to 
poor air quality. MoDOT makes every effort to build 
and operate roads in ways that improve air quality. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
establishes air quality standards for the United States. 
The ground level ozone standard is used in this 
measure as a threshold for determining if areas of the 
state have clean air. EPA collects ozone readings in 
Kansas City, St. Louis, Springfield and the out-state 
areas during the annual monitoring period - April 
through October. 

The data contained in the table below reflects the 
available percentage of days, by area, that 
Missourians experienced clean air. MoDOT 
compares Missouri's ozone readings to Dallas, 
Texas, because of its similar pollutants and distance 
from other areas that affect its air quality. 



Improvement Status: 

In 2008, a cooler summer contributed to cleaner air 
than previous years. A new, stricter standard has 
been established to better meet long-term air quality 
improvement goals. MoDOT is committed to 
improving the regions' air quality by managing 
congestion to reduce emissions, modifying daily 
operations, modifying employee action, providing 
information to the public, being a leader in air quality 
improvement, providing alternative choices for 
commuters and promoting the use of environmentally 
friendly fuels and vehicles. MoDOT continues to 
serve on the air quality committees in Kansas City, 
St. Louis and Springfield. 

MoDOT partnered with the Missouri Department of 
Natural Resources and was awarded more than 
$700,000 from EPA through a Diesel Emissions 
Reduction Act grant. The grant activities are focused 
on retrofitting MoDOT vehicles with new diesel 
emission reduction technologies and increasing fuel 
efficiency. 



Percent of Missouri's Clean Air Days 







2005 



2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



St. Louis 
Kansas City 
Springfield 
Out-State 
Dallas, TX 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



10D 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Environmentally Responsible 



Number of gallons of fuel consumed- lOe 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Jeannie Wilson, Central Office General Services Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the use of fuel and fuel 
efficiency within MoDOT. It shows MoDOT's 
contribution toward environmental responsibility and 
conservation of resources. The first chart shows the 
total number of gallons of fuel consumed. The 
second chart indicates the average miles per gallon 
for the five vehicle classes that accumulate the 
majority of miles driven. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This measure is intended to focus on the total fuel 
consumed and how wise choices can impact fuel 
economy. Data is collected based on the number of 
gallons of fuel consumed by unit recorded in the 
statewide financial system. 

MoDOT must meet the following state guidelines: 
70 percent of the light duty vehicles (<=8,500 GVW) 
purchased must be alternative fuel capable; 30 
percent of the fuel that our light duty alternative fuel 
fleet uses must be alternative fuel; 75 percent of all 
diesel fuel burned (off road and on road) must be a 
minimum of B20 blend (20 percent biodiesel and 80 
percent diesel) or higher. 



Improvement Status: 

In comparing fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2008, the 
total fuel consumed decreased by 6.8 percent and the 
miles driven decreased by 3 percent. This equates to 
approximately 600,000 gallons of fuel conserved. 

In reviewing the data by fuel type, diesel decreased 
approximately 695,000 gallons (10.8 percent), 
unleaded gasoline increased by 122,000 gallons (5.4 
percent), and E85 decreased by 27,000 gallons (19.3 
percent). 

Some of the reasons for the reduction are: a milder 
winter in most areas of the state; using the most fuel 
efficient piece of equipment to do the job; performing 
work that required lighter pieces of fleet; replacing 
diesel units with gasoline units; and installing 
automatic idle shut down features on heavy 
equipment in most districts. 




July 2009 



IOe 



Environmentally Responsible 



10.000 



8.000 



<j) 6.000 

n 
E 

Z 4.000 



2.000 



0.000 



2005 



Number of Gallons of Fuel Consumed 
(in millions) 



8.550 
5.443 




8.254 




8.727 
3.534 


i— 


8.866 
4.103 




8.266 




3.140 






3.278 



2006 2007 2008 2009 

Fiscal Year 



a Gasoline 

8cE85 
D Diesel 

D Biodiesel 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Statewide Average Miles per Gallon for Five Main 

Vehicle Classes 
(Cars, Pickups, Light Duty Trucks, Heavy Duty Trucks and Extra 

Heavy Duty Trucks) 

12.00 



c 

£ 9.00 

D 

(!) 

5 6.00 

a. 
v> 

M 3.00 



0.00 













8.88 






1 








1 







2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



1 OE (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Environmentally responsible 



Number of historic resources avoided or protected as compared to 
those mitigated- 1 Of 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Bob Reeder, Historic Preservation Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

Federal historic preservation laws relating to 
federally funded projects, gaining public and agency 
support for particular projects, and general 
environmental stewardship require MoDOT to avoid, 
minimize or mitigate project impacts to historic 
buildings, bridges and marked cemeteries whenever 
feasible. Compiling information about project 
impacts to important cultural resources provides a 
measure of MoDOT' s success at avoiding, protecting 
or mitigating project impacts to important cultural 
resources. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data collection begins at the approved conceptual 
plans stage for projects. As project design plans and 
right of way plans are prepared by the district, 
department staff track the number of historic 
resources in project footprints and the number of 
resources that can be avoided or protected by revising 
the design of a project versus the number of resources 
MoDOT can not avoid and must be mitigated. The 
data includes only historic resources identified as 
potentially affected by projects after the conceptual 
plan stage. The data does not include historic 
resources avoided during early project planning or 



those avoided during consideration of different 
alignments during National Environmental Policy 
Act studies. This measure has no overall desired 
trend. For any year, data for the measure will vary 
due to the number of projects in the MoDOT program 
and the specific nature of those projects. This 
measure is tracked by calendar year with quarterly 
updates. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT avoided project impacts to all but eight 
historic resources during the first two quarters of 
2009. All eight impacted historic resources were 
bridges, including two on Route 17 (one in Miller 
County and one in Pulaski County), the Missouri 
River Bridge at Miami and five smaller bridges to be 
replaced by the Safe & Sound Bridge Improvement 
Program. Adverse impacts from the demolition of 
these bridges were mitigated through the preparation 
of detailed photographic and historical 
documentation of each bridge. While there is no 
desired trend to this measure, the goal of MoDOT' s 
historic preservation efforts is to minimize adverse 
project impacts to historic properties whenever it is 
feasible and prudent. 



Number of Historic Resources Avoided or 
Protected as Compared to Those Mitigated 




■ Avoided 
□ Protected 
D Mitigated 



2004 2005 2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 YTD 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



© 






July 2009 



10F 



Environmentally Responsible 



Number of tons of recycled/waste materials used in construction 
projects- lOg 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Dave Ahlvers, State Construction and Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT's efforts to be 
environmentally conscious through the use of 
recycled/waste material when applicable. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The number of tons of recycled/waste material used 
in construction projects is measured through 
MoDOT's construction management database, which 
tracks material incorporated into projects. Data is 
collected on an annual basis due to the seasonal 
nature of the construction. The annual total is 
finalized in each April edition. 



Improvement Status: 

Reclaimed concrete pavement on the new 1-64 
project in St. Louis comprises the largest part of 
recycled material used in first half of 2009. There 
were nearly 240,000 tons of concrete crushed for use 
as rock fill, aggregate base and haul road surfacing. 
Crushing of concrete removed from the project is 98 
percent complete. 



Number of Tons of Recycled/Waste Materials 
Used in Construction Projects 



1,000 




2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



YTD 2009 



& 



lOG 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 






■ 






Efficient Movement of Goods 

Tangible Result Driver - Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 



Missouri's location in the nation's center makes it a major crossroads in the movement 
of goods. Transportation infrastructure must be up to the task so that as the flow of 
freight becomes more efficient, businesses and communities share the economic 
benefits. 






*^> 



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: 




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■ 


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Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



Freight tonnage by mode-1 la 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Ernie Perry Administrator of Freight Development 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks trends and indicates 
diversification of freight movement on Missouri's 
transportation system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. However, individual 
charts are updated as new data is obtained from 
external sources. Port tonnage is reported to MoDOT 
from public ports and the Army Corps of Engineers. 
Air cargo data is collected via mail survey to 
commercial airports with known cargo activity. Rail 
tonnage is obtained from the Association of 
American Railroads. MoDOT calculates motor 
carrier freight movement using commercial vehicle 
miles traveled, trip length per shipment and average 
truck cargo weight. 

Improvement Status: 

Total freight tonnage for all modes increased slightly 
in 2007 to more than 880 million tons. While the 
2007 data does not reflect ongoing economic trends, 
in 2008, all freight modes show the effects of the 
continued economic downturn. Nationally reported 
freight transport rates are down from between 1 1 and 
40 percent. However, the rate of decline is 



decreasing and there is some hint of a rebound in 
some sectors of the manufacturing and logistics 
areas. Port tonnage has remained relatively steady 
since 2003 despite low flows on the Missouri River. 
Proposals to mitigate for these decreased freight 
movements on the Missouri river have been 
submitted to the federal Maritime Administration and 
Missouri's congressional body. On the Mississippi 
River, long-term growth of river transportation is 
hampered by an inadequate lock and dam system. 
Motor carrier data may not directly reflect exact 
industry tonnage amounts and should only be used to 
indicate general industry trends. 

In 2008, motor carrier tonnage is off nearly 20 
percent while truck numbers increased slightly. 
Aviation tonnage continues to be impacted by a 
downturn in the aviation industry and the resulting 
financial impacts to airlines, which carry a significant 
portion of high- value air cargo., MoDOT' s Aviation 
Advisory Committee helps identify ways to better 
support the commercial aviation industry. Rail freight 
tonnage decreased slightly less than 10 percent in 
2007, which is again likely related to the overall 
economic downturn. 



1000 

800 
CD 
g> 600 

| 40 ° 
200 



Total Freight Tonnage 
(in millions) 




2003 



2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



1 1A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



40 
0)30 
1 20 
£10 



Port Freight Tonnage 
(in millions) 






34. 1 -lO Q 

1=1 2.4r^^ 2.4 28.0 30.7 99 28.7 


1 1 2 " 3 


2.3 






6.3 




1 .2.5 



] Public 
I Private 



^AR 




2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 







500 
<D 400 
©300 
I 200 
,2 100 




Motor Carrier Freight Tonnage 
(in millions) 



1 — — I 

— — B~ 



2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



0.40 

O 0.30 
O) 

C 0.20 
c 
o 0.10 

0.00 



Aviation Freight Tonnage 
(in millions) 




2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



600 
0,500 
O)400 
C 300 
O 200 
"" 100 




Rail Freight Tonnage 
(in millions) 





,-,501 r-511 


rf 14 n 51B rn5l4 




— U U 


1 1 
















H(T*Tr^H 
















— 



2003 2004 2005 2006 

Calendar Year 



2007 



I — I 
□ 



MO 1 
IL J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



July 2009 



1 1A(2) 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



Percent of trucks using advanced technology at Missouri weigh 
stations-lib 



Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Barbara Hague, Special Projects Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure indicates motor carriers' acceptance 
of tools designed to improve the flow of freight 
traffic on Missouri highways. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

For this quarterly measure, data is collected by 
HELP, Inc.'s PrePass system computers which 
scan transponder-equipped vehicles as they 
approach 19 Missouri weigh stations. Pavement 
sensors check the vehicle's weight while 
computers review MoDOT's records to determine 
the carrier' s compliance with safety, insurance 
and other state and federal regulations. Drivers are 
notified to stop or are allowed to continue without 
delay. Carriers that comply with state and federal 
regulations save time and money. The Missouri 
State Highway Patrol provides a quarterly 
measure of the number of trucks that use 
Missouri's weigh-in-motion scales located at 
May view and Foristell. These scales measure 
weight as trucks pass over them at 40 mph. Using 
ramp scales rather than verifying weight on fixed 
scales that require a full stop saves both time and 
money. The benchmark state of Kentucky uses 



Ramp Sorter weigh-in-motion scales as its 
primary weighing tool and participates in 
Norpass, a mainline verification system. 
Kentucky's mainline verification numbers are 
much lower than Missouri's because their use of 
fixed scales is limited. 

Improvement Status: 

The second quarter figures showed a slight 
decrease in the number of vehicles using 
advanced technology to verify compliance 
through the PrePass program as compared to the 
first quarter of 2009. Results for this quarter were 
also lower than the same quarter in 2008. The 
year-to-date figures for 2009 remain fairly 
constant reflecting the continued economic impact 
on the motor carrier industry, but remains at the highest 
level since this measurement began in 2003. 

During this quarter, a contract to update the 
Missouri CVISN business plan was signed and the 
vendor made an on-site visit. The CVISN plan 
outlines three to five-year goals to expand 
Missouri commercial motor vehicle intelligent 
transportation operations. 



Percent of Trucks Using Advanced Technology 
at Missouri Weigh Stations 

98.9 98.2 



98.2 




I I Missouri 
Weigh-in- 
Motion 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



YTD 2009 



■ Missouri 
PrePass 

^Kentucky 
Systems 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



j 



1 IB 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



Interstate motor carrier mileage- 1 1c 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Joy Prenger, Accounting Services Supervisor 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure reports the fluctuations of motor carrier 
freight movement in Missouri. MoDOT uses the 
information to monitor freight movement trends. 



percent fewer miles here and Missouri-based 
companies drove 11.1 percent fewer miles in their 
home state. 



Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data is collected quarterly. International Fuel Tax 
Agreement tax returns filed by member states and 
provinces and monthly reports of mileage data by the 
members are used to monitor the number of taxable 
miles traveled in Missouri by all motor carriers. 

Improvement Status: 

Total interstate miles traveled in Missouri decreased 
five percent from last quarter. 

During the second quarter of 2009, motor carriers 
traveled 14.9 percent fewer miles in Missouri than in 
the second quarter of 2008. Compared to the same 
time last year, out-of-state carriers traveled 15.9 



The first two quarters of 2009 continue to show a 
decrease in the movement of goods. Based on the 
same two quarters in 2008, total interstate miles 
traveled have decreased 1 1 .49 percent, Missouri- 
based company mileage decreased 9.22 percent and 
out-of-state carriers traveling in Missouri decreased 
12.14 percent. Related industry news reports: 

The freight index fell 1.2 percent in April. 

The 1.2 percent decline in the first four 

months of 2009 is the second largest in the 

last decade. 

The average price of diesel fuel is $2,542. 

This is a -$2.22 decrease from a year ago. 



Interstate Motor Carrier Mileage 



1,200 
1,000 

n o 

F = 600 
z § 400 
200 




1 st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr. 1 st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 
2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



944 970 938 


iff! 




802 ^2^ 


825 




728 




763 




723 




582 




669 




641 





□ Taxable Miles 
MO Carriers 

□ Taxable Miles 
Out-of-State 
Carriers 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 









July 2009 



1 lc 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



Percent of satisfied motor carriers- 1 Id 



Results Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: DeAnne Rickabaugh, Outreach Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT's progress toward the 
goal of expeditiously meeting the needs of the motor 
carrier industry and facilitating freight movement. 
MoDOT's Motor Carrier Services team uses the data 
to identify opportunities to improve customer 
satisfaction. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MCS personnel, working with Heartland Market 
Research, LLC, revised a survey to collect customer 
satisfaction data. The survey, sent to 800 MCS clients 
each month, addresses all five MCS program 
divisions, International Registration Plan, 
International Fuel Tax Agreement, 
Oversize/Overweight Permitting, Safety and 
Compliance and Operating Authority. Survey 
respondents identified the services they use when 
doing business with MCS, then indicated their level 
of satisfaction with 12 customer service factors such 
as "timely response," "friendly," "respectful," and 
"outcome." They also gave an "overall satisfaction" 
score. Customers used a four-point scale: 4 = Very 
Satisfied, 3 = Satisfied, 2 = Dissatisfied and 1 = Very 
Dissatisfied. Survey results are reported quarterly. 

H. J. Heinz Company is the benchmark for this 
measure that also mirrors measure 5 a, Percent of 
Overall Customer Satisfaction. The American 
Customer Satisfaction Index reports that Heinz has 
the highest customer satisfaction rate of 200 
companies and government agencies it scores - 89 
percent - which is a decrease compared to last year' s 
score of 90 percent. 



Improvement Status: 

This quarter's data stems from customers' opinions 
of service received during January, February and 
March of 2009. 

The survey reports Motor Carrier Services' customer 
satisfaction rating of 92.3 percent in the first quarter 
of 2009. This is down 1.1 points compared to the 
fourth quarter of 2008. When compared to the first 
quarter of 2008, the rating is down 2.3 points. The 
ratio of people who said they were "very satisfied" 
with the service they received from MCS in the first 
quarter 2009 is 52.6 percent, a 4.5 percent decrease 
from the previous quarter. 

Annual ratings for 2006-2008 describe steady 
progress toward a majority of "very satisfied" 
customers. 

To retain and improve customer satisfaction, MCS 
worked with Information Systems to build a new 
function into MoDOT Carrier Express. Carriers can 
now order 72-hour registration, fuel tax and authority 
trip permits online 24 hours a day. 



1 Id 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



100 



80 



60 

c 
<D 
O 

<D 

a- 40 



20 



Percent of Satisfied Motor Carriers 




2006 



2007 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 lstQtr2009 

Calendar Year/Quarter 



DVery 

Satisfied 
■Satisfied 

-H.J. Heinz 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 







July 2009 



11 d (2) 



Efficient Movement of Goods 



Customer satisfaction with timeliness of Motor Carrier Services' 
response-lie 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: DeAnne Rickabaugh, Outreach Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks motor carriers' satisfaction with 
MoDOT Motor Carrier Services' speed of response. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Each month, MoDOT' s contractor, Heartland Market 
Research, LLC, surveys a pool of 800 motor carriers 
who contacted MCS in the previous month. These 
customers are asked to evaluate their satisfaction with 
12 customer service factors across the five MCS 
program divisions, International Registration Plan, 
International Fuel Tax Agreement, Safety and 
Compliance, Oversize/Overweight Permitting and 
Operating Authority. "Timely Response" is one 
factor carriers evaluate with a four-point scale: 4 = 
Very Satisfied, 3 = Satisfied, 2 = Dissatisfied and 1 = 
Very Dissatisfied. Survey results are reported 
quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

This quarter's data stems from customers' opinions 
of service received during January, February and 
March 2009. 



At 92.3 percent, satisfaction with Motor Carrier 
Services' timely response is 2 points lower than last 
quarter and 4.6 percentage points lower than the same 
time last year. The rate of "very satisfied" customers 
fell 7.5 points since last quarter and 8.1 points since 
the same time in 2008 even as telephone hold and 
walk-in wait times decreased in YTD 2009. 

MCS worked to improve response time with 

teamwork. 

As a deadline loomed, OSOW agents 
verified titles, tax receipts and other 
documents required for license plate renewal 
so IRP agents could concentrate on handling 
a spike in phone calls and walk-in 
customers. 

With the help of Information Systems, 
upgraded MoDOT Carrier Express to 
display a customer' s account information on 
the agent' s screen when a call arrives at their 
desk. 



Customer Satisfaction with Timeliness 
of Motor Carrier Services' Response 



100 
80 

60 

c 
0) 

i 40 

20 




72.9 


89.8 




94.2 




94.3 




92.3 


33.4 


41.7 




52.4 




54.0 




46.5 


■n- 









□ Very Satisfied 

□ Satisfied 



2006 



2007 2008 4th Qtr. IstQtr. 

2008 2009 

Calendar Year/Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



1 IE 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 




Easily Accessible Modal Choices 

Tangible Result Driver - Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 



MoDOT has an active role in all modes of transportation, including rail, air, water, and 
transit. Transportation is more than highways and bridges. Every day millions of tons of 
goods move through the state by rail. Thousands of passengers use Missouri's airport 
facilities. And hundreds of barges navigate state waterways. All of these modes combine 
to keep Missouri's economy robust and vital. 




/■ 



\ 



Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of airline passengers- 12a 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Joe Pestka, Administrator of Aviation 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of passengers 
boarding airplanes at Missouri's commercial airports. 
It helps determine the viability of Missouri's 
commercial airline industry. This number is also 
used by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 
to help determine airports' capital improvement 
funding levels. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data is collected annually from FAA. 
Comparison data has been collected from the same 
source for the states of Arizona and Washington. 
These two states were selected based on similar 
populations in 2004. The annual passenger 
boardings' data provided by the FAA is normally 
published in October for the preceding year. An 
estimate of 2008 Missouri airport passenger 
boardings has been made based on discussions with 
individual airports in the state. Airline passengers are 
defined as passengers boarding airplanes. 



Improvement Status: 

Airline passengers have increased approximately 3.5 
percent in Missouri from 2006 to 2007 and have 
grown at an average annual rate of 4.3 percent since 
2004. A preliminary estimate was obtained from the 
commercial service airports in the state for 2008 and 
would indicate a decrease in activity from 2007 to 
2008. Increases in airline operational costs, weak 
economic conditions and a decrease in flight 
schedules at Kansas City International Airport and 
Lambert St. Louis International Airport have 
attributed to a decrease in passenger boardings. 

State legislation passed in 2008 includes up to $2 
million annually for the study and promotion of 
expanded domestic or international scheduled 
commercial service or the study and promotion of 
intrastate scheduled commercial service. Both the 
city of Springfield and the city of Joplin recently 
completed the construction of a new terminal 
building and a privately owned commercial service 
airport opened in Branson in May 2009. 



Number of Airline Passengers 
(in millions) 




2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 est. 

Calendar Year 



w 


IMO 


^*- 


AZ 


A 


WA 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



12a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of daily scheduled airline flights- 12b 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Joe Pestka, Administrator of Aviation 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of airline flights. 
The data assists in determining options available to 
the traveling public. It provides an indication of the 
airline industry's economic stability in Missouri. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

A direct scheduled airline flight is a take-off by a 
scheduled commercial air carrier. A direct flight has 
the same flight number and is flying to one or more 
destinations. Data is being collected from seven 
airports in the state that accommodate scheduled 
airline flights. These airports are: St. Louis Lambert 
International, Kansas City International, Springfield- 
Branson, Joplin, Columbia, Waynesville and Cape 
Girardeau. Comparison data has been collected for 
the commercial airports in Arizona and Washington. 
These two states were selected based on similar 
populations in 2004. The data is collected from the 
Official Airline Guide. The flights are tracked on a 
monthly basis with a daily snapshot collected for 
each month and are then averaged on a quarterly 
basis. 



Improvement Status: 

Daily scheduled airline flights in Missouri have 
decreased from 977 in the second quarter of 2008 to 
849 in the second quarter of 2009. Airline flights 
have increased from 828 in the first quarter of 2009 
to 849 in the second quarter of 2009. A number of 
airlines that operate at Missouri airports have 
decreased service due to weak economic conditions. 

State legislation passed in 2008 includes up to $2 
million annually for the study and promotion of 
expanded domestic or international scheduled 
commercial service and for the study and promotion 
of intrastate scheduled commercial service. MoDOT 
is participating with five rural commercial service 
airports in an air service study. 



2,000 



1,500 



£ 1,000 

3 



500 



Number of Daily Scheduled Airline Flights 

(Direct) 



1,241 



fit** O 1 ' 029 JJi 4 ^ 1 ' 099 ^ >203 o 

1X156 V, onA /\ .052 ^1.074 Vi haa , 



1,266 



1,043 1,017 



1,093 



9210 





2nd 3rd 4th IstQtr. 2nd 3rd 4th IstQtr. 2nd 

Qtr. Qtr. Qtr. 2008 Qtr. Qtr. Qtr. 2009 Qtr. 

2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



12b 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of business-capable airports- 12c 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Joe Pestka, Administrator of Aviation 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of airports capable of 
handling business aircraft. Local communities and 
economic development agencies can use airports to 
assist in increasing a community's economic viability 
for business retention and development. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The graph shows the number of business-capable 
airports. A business-capable airport is defined as 
accommodating business- or corporate-type aircraft 
with a runway length of 5,000 feet or more. 
Comparison data starting in 2005 has been collected 
from Arizona and from Wisconsin starting in 2008. 
These states have a population similar to Missouri. 
Geographically, Wisconsin is similar to Missouri 
while Arizona is approximately 65 percent larger 
than Missouri. Data is collected annually by 



monitoring airport developments and Federal 
Aviation Administration records. 

Improvement Status: 

The State Airport System Plan Update and the annual 
development of MoDOT's Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Plan identify airports that meet the 
demand criteria and would support the development 
of a 5,000-foot runway. A new business-capable 
airport is under construction in Branson West and a 
privately owned commercial service airport opened 
in Branson in May 2009. State legislation passed in 
2008 increased the cap on the State Aviation Trust 
Fund from $6 million to $10 million annually, which 
will allow additional funding for airport 
improvements. 



Number of Business-Capable Airports 




2005 2006 2007 2008 YTD 2009 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



12c 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of transit passengers- 1 2d 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Steve Billings, Administrator of Transit 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure gauges the use of public transit 
mobility services in Missouri. It also provides a 
historical perspective and trend of public transit 
service use in Missouri. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The total number of transit passengers is measured by 
the annual total of one-way unlinked transit trips 
taken by passengers on public transit vehicles. Data is 
obtained from urban and rural providers of general 
public transit services. This measure is benchmarked 
to the state of New York, which has a historically 
high usage of public transit services. This is an 
annual fiscal year measure with Missouri data 
updated in October. 

Improvement Status: 

In 2008, Missouri's statewide metropolitan transit 
ridership increased by 4.2 million one-way unlinked 
passenger trips compared to the previous year. 
However, where passenger fare increases took place 
during that period, for each of those transit systems 
(Springfield, St. Joseph and Jefferson City), the 
ridership declined. Non-metro (rural) ridership 



decreased slightly from 2.8 million trips in 2007 to 
2.7 million trips in 2008. Of the 27 rural transit 
systems in Missouri, 18 of the systems experienced 
ridership gains, and the remainder experienced 
reductions in ridership. More than all of the net loss 
in statewide rural transit use came as a result of 
curtailed services for work-related trips cut as a 
consequence of decreased funding to Missouri in the 
federal Job Access and Reverse Commute Program. 

Missouri compared 20 percent below New York 
State's non-Metro transit ridership in 2008. New 
York's rural population in the 2000 Census was 3.4 
million or 20 percent greater than Missouri's rural 
population of 1.7 million. New York State's metro 
ridership vastly exceeded Missouri's metro transit 
ridership with just over 2.8 billion trips taken 
compared to 69 million metro transit passenger trips 
in Missouri for 2008. MoDOT worked with transit 
providers in developing the second Missouri Rural 
Transit Marketing Campaign. Marketing materials 
were distributed to rural transit systems with radio 
and television spots first airing in January 2008. 




July 2009 



12d 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



3,000.0 

2,500.0 

2,000.0 
<D 

n 

£ 1,500.0 

z 

1,000.0 

500.0 

0.0 



Number of Transit Passengers 
(in millions of annual one-way unlinked 
metro transit passenger trips) 

A 2736.1 A 
A 2572.2 A 2595.5 A 2606.1 ^ 2807.4 



61.4 



2004 



62.7 



67.3 



2005 2006 

Fiscal Year 



65.4 
2007 



69.6 



2008 



I Missouri Metro 



A New York State 
Metro 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



© 
n 

E 



9.0 
8.0 
7.0 
6.0 
5.0 



2004 



Number of Transit Passengers 
(in millions of annual one-way unlinked 
non-metro transit passenger trips) 




i Missouri 
Non-Metro 

D New York State 
Non-Metro 



2005 



2006 
Fiscal Year 



2007 



2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



1 2d (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Average number of days per week rural transit service is available- 12e 



Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Steve Billings, Administrator of Transit 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure identifies the average existing public 
transit service in rural Missouri by indicating the 
availability of rural mobility services for 
employment, medical appointments and necessary 
shopping. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

To calculate the statewide average number of days 
per week rural transit service is available, MoDOT 
reviews published transit service schedules for each 
rural Missouri county and averages these daily 
frequencies within a week's schedule for available 
county- wide transit service. Rural transit agencies 
operate on an annual budget and customarily make 
transit service changes with the start of a new budget 
year. This is an annual measure with updates 
occurring in April. The measure is benchmarked to 
Tennessee, which has a comparable statewide 
population and some amount of transit service in 
every rural county as does Missouri. 



Improvement Status: 

Rural transit service at a statewide average of two 
days per week is not sufficient to support full-time 
employment for its riders. For 2009, Tennessee 
deployed more days of rural transit service with five- 
day-a-week service, subject to available seating. 
Tennessee directs more state funding annually to 
rural public transportation ($7.2 million vs. $1.1 
million in Missouri). Tennessee's transit providers 
also use pure demand-response dispatching compared 
to designated daily routes used by OATS and other 
Missouri providers. However in 2007, Missouri's 
rural transit providers together delivered 2.8 million 
trips compared to 1.5 million rural transit trips 
provided in Tennessee. 

MoDOT worked with rural transit systems to produce 
a second rural transit marketing campaign. As part of 
this campaign, television and radio advertising began 
in January 2008. MoDOT also procured rural transit 
intelligent transportation system design services to 
begin projects to increase transit service through 
scheduling efficiencies. 



7.0 

6.0 

5 5-0 

■g 4.0 

| 3.0 

z 2.0 

1.0 

0.0 



Average Number of Days Per Week 
Rural Transit Service is Available 



^5.0 A 5.0 A 5.0 



A 50 A^ 





I Missouri 



A Tennessee 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



12E 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of intercity bus stops- 1 2f 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Steve Billings, Administrator of Transit 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of intercity bus 
stops. Intercity bus stops represent access points to 
intercity bus services provided in Missouri by 
Greyhound, Jefferson Lines, Burlington Trailways 
and Megabus. More stops among Missouri's 114 
counties means greater access. Fewer stops create a 
barrier to access by requiring greater traveling 
distances in order to board an intercity bus. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data on the number and location of intercity bus 
stops is obtained annually from the national and 
regional intercity bus carriers. This is an annual 
measure with quarterly year-to-date updates of the 
most recent calendar year. The measure is 
benchmarked to Wisconsin, which has a comparable 
total statewide population. An additional benchmark 
to California was added for 2008 data. 

Improvement Status: 

The number of Missouri's intercity bus stops has 
stabilized after earlier reductions in Greyhound 



service. Most of the recent incremental growth in 
Missouri's intercity bus service has increased the 
schedule frequency for cities already receiving 
service rather than creating new bus stops in un- 
served areas. Earlier this year, Jefferson Lines moved 
the Lowry City stop to Collins and the Winston stop 
was dropped. Also, a route was discontinued in 
Wisconsin leading to the loss of seven stops there. 
The California bus stop data of 261 intercity bus 
stops is derived from a 2008 rural intercity bus study 
concluded last year. 

A MoDOT-sponsored statewide intercity bus study 
has completed initial project meetings with corporate 
officers of Greyhound, Jefferson Lines and 
Burlington Trailways. These initial meetings 
explored the potential for increased intercity bus 
stops and increased intercity bus service in Missouri. 
September 2008 and February 2009 meetings of the 
Intercity Bus Study Advisory Committee 
recommended additional new corridors and stops for 
consideration. 



300 

250 

- 200 

CD 

.Q 

£ 150 

D 

Z 100 

50 





Number of Intercity Bus Stops 



▲ 261 



I Missouri 
O Wisconsin 
-a— California 



0?4 <>70 0?4 67 



II II 



2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 YTD 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



G> 



12F 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of rail passengers- 12g 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Rod Massman, Administrator of Railroads 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of people using the 
Amtrak train service in Missouri. This includes those 
taking a train trip in Missouri at any point within the 
state, which counts those riding on the state- 
supported passenger rail trains between Kansas City 
and St. Louis, the national trains that run through the 
state and the St. Louis-to-Chicago trains, most of 
which are supported by the state of Illinois. 

For comparison purposes, the state of Washington's 
train data is shown based on the state's similar size, 
population and the fact that Washington has both 
national- and state- supported trains. Washington's 
"Cascades" train service is a model for the nation 
because the state invests millions of dollars in both 
infrastructure and operations every year. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Amtrak provides the number of passengers per train 
in Missouri on a monthly basis. MoDOT's 
Multimodal Operations Division's Railroad Section 
then tabulates the numbers. Data is updated 
quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

The months of April through June 2009 showed 
a decrease of less than 1 percent over the same 
months in 2008; however, for FY09, the total 
number of riders went from 138,000 to 154, 000, 
an 1 1 percent increase. MoDOT continued its publicity 
efforts through new roadside signs, news releases, a 
wide-ranging distribution of train schedules and use 
of the department' s dynamic message signs along the 
interstate system. These efforts, along with an 
increase in much better on-time performance - such 
as 96 percent in April, 94 percent in May and 



97 percent in June - 
numbers. 



helped increase passenger 



The track Amtrak operates on is owned by the Union 
Pacific Railroad and is a heavily used freight line 
with more than 50 trains a day. This makes it 
difficult to easily "flow" the trains for on-time 
performance. In response to this continual problem, 
MoDOT commissioned a study for freight and 
passenger capacity improvements on the Union 
Pacific line between St. Louis and Kansas City. This 
study was completed in July 2007 and contained 
many options for infrastructure improvements along 
the line mostly between Jefferson City and Kansas 
City. The Missouri Highways and Transportation 
Commission approved the study. The Missouri 
Legislature provided $5 million of new funding for 
infrastructure improvements in the 2008 budget. 
MoDOT also received a $3.3 million match from the 
Federal Railroad Administration to complement these 
state funds for a total of $8.3 million. Union Pacific 
began work on the California siding during May 
2009 and is scheduled to be completed by the end of 
2009. 

The federal American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act (ARRA) provides new funding possibilities for 
improving passenger rail service by targeting track 
infrastructure improvements that will increase 
fluidity and decrease delays. Applications prepared 
include sidings near Knob Noster, Jefferson City and 
Kirkwood, and universal crossovers at Hermann and 
Kirkwood and a second bridge over the Osage River. 
The new improvements, along with Union Pacific's 
improvements will profoundly impact the reliability 
of the service's performance. 



July 2009 



12G 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



800 



Number of Rail Passengers 
(in thousands) 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 




ZZI All Missouri Trains 

ZZI Missouri State- 
Sponsored Trains 

O All Washington 
Trains 

■^Washington State- 
Sponsored Trains 



J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



100 



80 



<j> 60 

n 

E 

D 

Z 40 



20 



Number of Rail Passengers on Missouri 

State-Sponsored Trains by Quarter 

(in thousands) 




IstQtr 2ndQtr 3rdQtr 

Fiscal Quarter 



4th Qtr 



■ FY08 
DFY09 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



1 2G (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Number of passengers and vehicles transported by ferryboat- 12h 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sherrie Turley, Waterways Program Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks information regarding use of 
ferryboat services in Missouri. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Missouri's two ferry services submit a monthly report 
that includes information on the number of 
passengers and vehicles, the cost for providing the 
service and the reasons for any service disruption. 
This measure is updated on a quarterly basis. 

Improvement Status: 

The New Bourbon ferryboat was closed part of the 
first quarter for high water. In fiscal year 2009, the 
ferry operated 318 days compared to 292 days in 
fiscal year 2008. The ferry transported 12,654 
vehicles compared to 13,852 in 2008 for a decrease 
of nine percent. The number of passengers 
decreased from 35,654 in fiscal year 2008 to 30,432 
in fiscal year 2009 for a decrease of 15 percent. 



Federal funds are being used to construct a high- 
water mooring for the ferry equipment. Plans and 
specifications for the project are being reviewed for 
approval from FHWA. 

The Mississippi County ferryboat closed due to high 
water March 12, 2008, and remained out of service 
until March 1, 2009, due to equipment repairs. 
MoDOT has worked with the port to have the boat 
repaired and hire a new captain. Service resumed on 
March 1, 2009. The service operated 95 days 
between March 1 and June 30 and carried 4,404 
vehicles with 9,767 passengers. 

The temporary ferry service in Glasgow began 
operation August 4, 2008, when the bridge closed for 
rehabilitation. Through June 14, 2009, after 45 
weeks of service, the ferry has transported 73,708 
vehicles with 125,452 passengers. 



CD 

n 

E 



60.0 
50.0 
40.0 
30.0 
20.0 
10.0 
0.0 



Number of Passengers and Vehicles 

Transported by Ferryboat 

New Bourbon Regional 

(in thousands) 





58.8 






36.7 

_r 


34.6 


-T 


35.7 


30.4 



I Vehicles 
D Passengers 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



July 2009 



12h 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



(d 



50.0 
40.0 
30.0 



E 

^ 20.0 

10.0 

0.0 



Number of Passengers and Vehicles 

Transported by Ferryboat 

Mississippi County 

(in thousands) 



39.9 



D 



39.1 






38.8 



23.9 






4.4 I 



9.8 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



□ Vehicles 

□ Passengers 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zt 



60.0 

50.0 

5 40.0 

£ 30.0 

Z 20.0 

10.0 

0.0 



Number of Passengers and Vehicles 

Transported by Ferryboat 

Glasgow 

(in thousands) 



38.0 



fiill E 

— B 1 



42.0 



23.0 



-M 



IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 3rd Qtr. 2009 4th Qtr. 2009 

Fiscal Year 



■Vehicles 
D Passengers 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



1 2h (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



State funding for multimodal programs- 12i 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 
Measurement Driver: Lisa Hueste, Resource Management Specialist 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure provides the history of state funding 
appropriated by the Missouri state legislature for 
multimodal programs that include transit, rail, air and 
waterways. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each July. State 
funding for multimodal programs is determined by 
the amount of revenue the state collects each year. 
MoDOT has several funds, including the General 
Revenue Fund, dedicated to multimodal programs for 
assisting Missouri citizens. The spending of funds 
throughout the fiscal year must be requested and 
authorized by MoDOT and the state legislature. The 
legislature may also authorize spending through bills 
filed by the General Assembly. 

Improvement Status: 

The 2009 legislative session resulted in funding 
decreases for some of the multimodal programs due 
to a decline in revenues and switching state funding 
to federal funding. Overall, the programs received 
$17.4 million for fiscal year 2010, a decrease of 
$16.2 million from fiscal year 2009. 

Transit funding remained constant for the Transit and 
Missouri Elderly and Handicapped Transportation 
Assistance programs for fiscal year 2010. Due to a 
decline in revenues, some General Revenue funding 
was switched to the State Transportation Fund. 



State funding for rail decreased $9.5 million from 
fiscal year 2009. Daily rail service provided by 
Amtrak was state funded in 2009 for $8 million. For 
2010, legislators increased this amount by $1 million 
and at the same time switched $5.5 million to federal 
funding. In total, state funding for daily rail service in 
2010 was approved for $3.5 million. In addition, $5 
million for Amtrak capital improvement funding was 
reduced to reflect the second year of a two-year 
appropriation. 

Waterways funding was reduced $6.65 million to 
reflect the second year of a two-year appropriation 
for capital improvement funding for infrastructure 
development. 

The aviation program will remain consistent with 
fiscal year 2009 aviation jet fuel tax collections. 
While legislation increased the cap amount from $6 
million to $10 million during the 2008 legislative 
session, revenue for the aviation jet fuel tax has 
declined dramatically. 

MoDOT continues to work with legislators to show 
the importance of how multimodal programs can 
effectively use state funds to improve economic 
development and provide needed services for 
Missouri's citizens. 




Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



r 



State Funding for Multimodal Programs 




2006 2007 2008 2009 

Fiscal Year 



2010 



■Transit 

□ Rail 

■ Waterways 

□ Aviation 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



50 



Total State Funding for Multimodal Programs 



40 



52 



CO 



g 30 



1 = 
°.E 20 



10 




1 I 



2006 



2007 



2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



2010 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



1 2i (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Easily Accessible Modal Choices 



Percent of customers satisfied with transportation options- 12j 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Multimodal Operations Director 

Measurement Driver: Eric Curtit, Long-Range Transportation Planning Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure provides information about the public's 
perception of MoDOT's performance in providing 
transportation options other than Missourians' 
personal vehicle. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. Data is collected through 
a telephone survey each May from interviews of 
approximately 3,500 randomly selected adult 
Missourians with an overall margin of error of +/- 2 
percent. 

Improvement Status: 

Sixty-eight percent of MoDOT's customers are 
satisfied with transportation options in Missouri. 
This measure increased by 1 1 percent from last year's 
results. There was also a 9 percent increase in 
customers who strongly agree they are satisfied with 
transportation options. 



The increase in satisfied customers between 2008 and 
2009 can be attributed to several factors. First, 
MoDOT continues to place an emphasis on 
transportation improvements in all modes including 
increased services to public transportation, more 
reliable passenger rail service and port enhancements. 
MoDOT has also followed through on commitments 
as outlined in the Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program, which increases satisfaction 
with customers. Also, gas prices rose to an all-time 
high in 2008. The gas prices then fell in 2009, so 
Missourians are more satisfied overall with 
transportation. For some of MoDOT's planning 
partners, an increase in funding through the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has 
allowed for additional opportunities to enhance 
various modes of transportation at their discretion. 



Percent of Customers Satisfied with 
Transportation Options 



100 
80 



§ 60 
O 

40 

a. 



20 




52 71 75 67 57 68 




Q D M 




_ 


in 


56 




54 






















39 








34 


34 


36 



■ Strongly Agree 
.□ Agree A 






2000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 

Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



12j 





























J 



iflPC" 






ost Q 




Customer Involvement in 
Transportation Decision- 
Making 

Tangible Result Driver - Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 



MoDOT seeks out and welcomes any idea that increases its options, because the de- 
partment doesn't have all the answers. The department creates and preserves a trans- 
portation decision-making process that is collaborative and transparent, involving its 
customers in the determination of needs right through to the development, design and 
delivery of projects. 




i 



Tracker 

Measures of departmental performance 



Customer Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making 



Number of customers who attend transportation-related meetings- 13a 



Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Bob Brendel, Outreach Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure gauges MoDOT' s public involvement 
success - both in terms of public meetings and 
hearings that are held to make collaborative decisions 
with the general public, communities, elected 
officials, stakeholders, and in terms of public 
informational events scheduled by MoDOT to keep 
its customers advised of project status and potential 
impacts that could be experienced. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Attendance is determined by analyzing sign-in sheets 
used at public meetings or by head counts conducted 
by MoDOT staff. This measure is updated quarterly. 



Participation in recent online meetings was gauged 
by using "Web Trends" software. 

Improvement Status: 

For the second consecutive quarter, more than 2,000 
people participated in online public meetings, 
pushing the total number of people attending 
transportation-related decision-making meetings to 
nearly 13,000. Included in the total was the first 
online meeting held in conjunction with a Safe & 
Sound bridge project. It was one of seven online 
meetings conducted by District 10 that reached a total 
of 1,219 people. 



Number of Customers Who Attend 
Transportation-Related Meetings 




2nd Qtr. 
2008 



3rd Qtr. 
2008 



4th Qtr. 
2008 



1st Qtr. 
2009 



2nd Qtr. 
2009 



Calendar Quarter 



□ Virtual 
Meetings 

■Traditional 
Meetings 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



13A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Customer involvement in Transportation Decision Making 



Percent of customers who are satisfied with feedback they receive 
from MoDOT after offering comments- 13b 



Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Bob Brendel, Outreach Coordinator 

Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT' s responses to its 
customers. MoDOT routinely asks people who attend 
public meetings/hearings to submit comments that 
will be examined by the project team and will 
become part of the project's official record. It is 
important that people who avail themselves of this 
opportunity know that their comments are taken 
seriously. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT routinely coordinates a survey in 
cooperation with university partners for persons who 
attend project- specific meetings and hearings. The 
initial survey was sent to more than 4,500 persons 
who attended meetings in a five-year period. A 
survey process continues, with contacts made each 
time a project reaches the official public hearing 
milestone. This is an annual measure based upon a 
fiscal year, and data is analyzed twice each year. 

Improvement Status: 

Customer satisfaction improved five percent from the 
mid-year report, largely due to the public acceptance 
of Safe & Sound bridge projects that began during 



the last six months. During all of FY2009, 35 projects 
were surveyed - nearly half of which (17) were Safe 
& Sound bridges. Overall satisfaction held steady 
from FY2008 at 68.1 percent, while 80.9 percent felt 
that projects were explained clearly and 66.1 percent 
felt that the decision-making process was open, 
transparent and fair. Interestingly, Safe & Sound 
projects scored significantly higher, with overall 
satisfaction of 86 percent, 97.7 percent credited 
MoDOT with clear explanations and 90.5 percent 
thought the process was open, transparent and fair. 
This is significant because Safe & Sound's strategy 
has been to stage 'community briefings' to explain 
improvement strategies, road closures and alternate 
routes. The results seem to validate MoDOT' s road 
closure strategy to speed the work and control costs 
and indicate that customers are willing to accept a bit 
of inconvenience to get a new, wider bridge. 

The survey tool has been modified to include space 
for written comments to give a better opportunity to 
understand customer concerns. 



Percent of Customers Who Are Satisfied with Feedback They 
Receive from MoDOT after Offering Comments 




1999-2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



Very 
Satisfied 

Satisfied 



Utility 
Companies* 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



*As measured by the American Customer Satisfaction Index. 



July 2009 



13b 



Customer Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making 



MoDOT takes into consideration customers' needs and views in 
transportation decision-making- 1 3c 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Sue Cox, Transportation Planning Special Projects Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This data helps determine the effectiveness of 
MoDOT' s project planning outreach efforts. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure, and this year's data, 
gathered from a statewide random telephone survey 
of approximately 3,500 Missourians, was collected in 
May 2009. A comparison is made to the Tennessee 
Department of Transportation, which also measures 
customers' perceptions regarding involvement in 
transportation decision-making. Tennessee DOT is 
in the process of updating its performance data. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT learned in the 2009 customer survey that 73 
percent of the survey sample feels MoDOT considers 
customer concerns and needs when developing 
transportation decisions. This is an increase of 8 
percent, moving up from 65 percent in 2008. 



Northwest Missouri State University is in the process 
of updating its 2006 measurement by surveying 
NMSU freshmen and juniors' satisfaction concerning 
student opportunities to provide input regarding 
student affairs at NMSU. The 2006 data is the most 
current information available. 

To continuously improve in this area, MoDOT 
identifies additional opportunities to use techniques 
as outlined in the planning framework decision- 
making and public involvement process with local 
officials, planning partners, community leaders, 
elected officials and the general public. Media 
interviews, Web site publicity, news releases, 
newsletters, specific project surveys, public 
involvement surveys and community meetings 
continually provide new opportunities to interact with 
the public, share MoDOT' s direction and discuss 
transportation priorities. 



MoDOT Takes into Consideration Customers' Needs 
and Views in Transportation Decision-Making 

100 
80 



0) 60 
O 

CD 

°-40 

20 





,—.77 ,-, 78 


u 


58 60 


65 




73 
26 






51 
11 


14 J 17 
if 5 t~ 




19 








_|_| 


I 








H Strongly 

Agree 
■ Agree 



^^Tennessee 
DOT 

□ NWMO 
State Univ. 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



13C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Customer Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making 



Percent of positive feedback responses received from planning partners 
regarding involvement in transportation decision-making- 13d 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Sue Cox, Transportation Planning Special Projects Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks MoDOT's efforts to include 
statewide planning partners (members of metropolitan 
planning organizations and regional planning 
commissions) in transportation-related decision-making. 

MoDOT's planning framework is a process used to 
ensure planning partners are able to influence 
transportation decisions regarding how transportation 
funds are spent in their areas. It is based on achieving 
informed consent rather than consensus. To continuously 
improve in this area, MoDOT focuses primarily on 
effective communication, and public involvement tools 
and techniques. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Transportation Planning works with Organizational 
Results to administer an annual survey in January that 
evaluates planning partners' involvement in the 
transportation decision-making process for the previous 
year. The survey scale measures those who agree, 
strongly agree, disagree and strongly disagree. 

Improvement Status: 

The 2008 survey received 77 responses from 158 
distributed e-mails resulting in a 48.7 percent response 
rate. The percent of strongly agree answers increased 
from 46 percent in 2007 to 53 percent in 2008. The 



survey focuses on feedback regarding the overall 
involvement of planning partners in the planning process 
rather than on individual MoDOT outreach activities. 

Feedback helps MoDOT learn new ways to achieve 
better involvement, fine-tune communication and try out 
ideas. This past year, survey improvements, including 
content adjustments and distribution processes, resulted 
in helpful feedback and a strong response rate. Survey 
results were shared with planning partners and co-efforts 
were initiated to act on concerns, solve problems and 
provide clarifying information. 

Transportation Planning also worked with each district to 
assess how the process works in the field. The strengths 
and weaknesses of the planning outreach process, the 
improvement areas and the best practices were identified. 
An action team is reviewing the information and 
selecting priorities for implementation. 

For comparison purposes, the Oregon Department of 
Transportation measured a similar involvement in 2006 - 
indicating 65 percent of all respondents involved in 
transportation planning felt their involvement in 
decision-making was effective; however, Oregon reports 
it will not update this data again until 201 1. 



Percent of Positive Feedback Responses from 
Transportation Planning Partners Regarding 
Involvement in Transportation Decision-Making 

~9T~ 



c 

CD 
O 

CD 

Q- 



100 



80 



60 



40 



20 





90 



92 



46 



D 



53 






fz 



2005 



2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



Strongly Agree 
Agree 
Oregon DOT 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



13d 





*H 



ti TlflSBBC 



DM 



Hill— 



Convenient, Clean and Safe 
Roadside Accommodations 

Tangible Result Driver - Don Hill is, Director of System Management 



Many Missouri motorists depend on roadside parks and rest areas during their travels 
for the opportunity to rest and refresh themselves in a safe environment. Providing 
safe, clean and convenient accommodations allows motorists to travel more safely and 
comfortably. 











Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Percent of customers satisfied with rest areas' convenience, 
cleanliness and safety- 14a 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Jim Carney, State Maintenance Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure helps MoDOT understand customer 
expectations concerning the convenience, cleanliness 
and safety of its rest areas. This information will 
provide insight to rest area location, lighting and 
security as well as the overall cleanliness 
expectations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT measures this attribute with both internal 
and external data collection. MoDOT receives 
information from a survey card offered at all rest 
areas. The survey card asks a variety of questions 
with three of the questions specifically asking if the 
rest area is convenient, clean and safe. This provides 
direct input from our customers and is considered the 
external source. All comments from the cards are 
sent to the districts and sheltered workshop contractor 
to ensure concerns are addressed in a timely manner. 

To ensure customer satisfaction, all rest areas are 
inspected using an attribute list developed and based 
on an industry-wide literature review. The attribute 
list includes characteristics rest-area users identified 
as what they consider convenient, clean and safe. 
MoDOT maintenance employees inspect all rest 
areas and the work of the sheltered workshop 
contractor at least two times per month using this list 
and are considered the internal source. 

MoDOT works with Extended Employment 
Sheltered Workshops to provide the cleaning at all 19 
rest areas in the system. The sheltered workshop 
employees provide this service 365 days a year, many 
from early morning (6 a.m.) to late in the evening (10 
p.m.). This measure is updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

The rest area survey cards were first made available 
in May 2005. A total of 6,835 were returned in fiscal 
year 2009 compared to 9,774 cards in fiscal year 
2008, 8,178 in fiscal year 2007 and 8,054 in fiscal 
year 2006. In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, 



3,120 cards were returned, a significantly higher 
number of returned surveys than in the fourth quarter 
of fiscal year 2008. The Conway Welcome Center 
reopened on May 4, 2009, and is the primary reason 
for the increase in survey cards, accounting for over 
50% (1,666) of the cards in the few weeks the site 
was open in this quarter. 

• Fourth Quarter fiscal year 2008, 1,981 surveys 
received 

• First Quarter fiscal year 2009, 2,210 surveys received 

• Second Quarter fiscal year 2009, 911 surveys 
received 

• Third Quarter fiscal year 2009, 594 surveys received 

• Fourth Quarter fiscal year 2009, 3,120 surveys 
received 

Customer satisfaction for the three attributes is 
slightly lower in two of the factors and higher in one 
factor when compared to the previous quarter. Most 
of the unsatisfactory comments are from older sites 
that are being replaced by new welcome centers. 
MoDOT implements actions to improve the 
cleanliness at rest areas with lower satisfaction 
ratings by direct contact with the responsible 
contractor and district personnel. Cards were 
returned from 49 states, Canada, Ireland, the United 
Kingdom, Switzerland, Mongolia, China and Spain. 

MoDOT is doing extremely well at meeting the 
customers' expectations for convenient, clean and 
safe facilities; largely in part to these inspections 
conducted a minimum of two times per month. The 
inspection scores decreased from 96.5 percent to 95.1 
percent for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009. 
The 96.5 percent mark was the highest quarterly 
score since MoDOT has conducted the internal 
inspections. MoDOT takes care of maintenance 
concerns in a timely manner to keep the rest areas 
open for use. 



14A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 





Percent of Customers Satisfied with Rest Areas' 


100 r 

80 - 


Convenience, Cleanliness and Safety 


97.6 


98.0 


97.5 


98.9 




. 


97.9 


96.6 


96.4 


98.9 


98.9 


98.7 


97.4 


98.5 




§ 60 - 
O 

<D 

a. 40 




































20 





































Convenient Clean Safe 


















Attribute 

















□ 4th Qtr. 
FY 2008 

□ 1st Qtr. 
FY 2009 

■ 2nd Qtr. 
FY 2009 

□ 3rd Qtr. 
FY 2009 

■ 4th Qtr. 
FY 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Note: Rest area customer satisfaction benchmarks are limited. Florida's 2004 rest area customer survey results found: 90 percent 
said the rest areas were clean, 83 percent said there were enough rest areas and 88 percent said the rest areas were safe. 



Percent of Customers Satisfied with Rest Areas' 
Convenience, Cleanliness and Safety 
Statewide Average Scoreof Rest Area Condition 
Internal Inspections 

100 



80 



C 60 
<D 

a 

I 40 



20 



^k*jEV^^| 




^■*7rWl 















4th Qtr. 2008 1 st Qtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 3rd Qtr. 2009 4th Qtr. 2009 

Fiscal Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



1 4a (2) 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Percent of customers satisfied with commuter lots' convenience, 
cleanliness and safety- 14b 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Tim Chojnacki, Maintenance Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure will help the department understand 
customer expectations concerning commuter lot 
convenience, cleanliness and safety. This 
information will provide insight to location, lighting 
and security at commuter lots as well as their overall 
cleanliness. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT receives information in the form of survey 
cards distributed by MoDOT employees at 20 
commuter lots. The survey contains a variety of 
questions, three of which specifically ask if the 
commuter lot is convenient, clean and safe. This is a 
baseline measure that provides direct input from the 
department' s customers and is considered an external 
source. This is an annual measure updated each 
January. 

To further assess conditions and ensure customer 
satisfaction with the commuter lots, all lots are 
inspected based on attributes identified in an 
industry-wide literature review as to what commuter 
lot customers consider convenient, clean and safe. 
MoDOT maintenance employees inspect all 
commuter lots each quarter. This measure is updated 
quarterly. 



Improvement Status: 

Commuter lot survey cards were distributed to 1 ,003 
customers in December 2008 and the department 
received 257 responses. 95 percent of the customers 
thought the lots were convenient with 73 percent 
using them at least five days per week. 82 percent 
cited saving fuel costs as the most important reason 
to use the lot, with being good for the environment 
and the cost of parking at the destination being other 
considerations. 87 percent of the customers were 
satisfied with cleanliness of the lots compared to 79 
percent in 2007. 96 percent of customers were 
satisfied with safety at the lots compared to 80 
percent in 2007. 

The quarterly inspections provide input to district 
maintenance supervisors on work needed at the 
commuter lot for condition of signs, parking lot 
surface, litter, and vegetation management. The May 
2009 inspections showed the statewide average 
condition remained nearly the same as it was the 
previous quarter, 91.7 percent compared to 91.9 
percent. 




14B 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Percent of Customers Satisfied with Commuter Lots' 
Convenience, Cleanliness and Safety 



100 

80 

1 60 
o 

<j> 40 

a. 

20 






97.0 




95.1 














1 














67.0 






,_ 




83.2 












82.0 



















Convenient 



Clean 
Attribute 



Safe 



□ 2005 

□ 2006 
■ 2007 

□ 2008 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Percent of Customers Satisfied with Commuter Lots 1 
Convenience, Cleanliness and Safety 
Statewide Average Score of Commuter Lot Condition 
Internal Inspections 



100 




May 2008 Aug. 2008 Nov. 2008 Feb. 2009 

Inspection Date 



May 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



July 2009 



1 4b(2) 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Number of users of commuter parking lots- 14c 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Tim Chojnacki, Maintenance Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of commuter parking 
lot users. It will help the department determine 
whether its commuter parking lots are adequate at 
current locations and whether lots are fulfilling the 
needs of the traveling public. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

District maintenance personnel count the number of 
vehicles parked in each commuter lot in conjunction 
with the quarterly condition inspections. Data is 
collected from every district to create a statewide 
report. This measure is updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

There was an increase in the number of available 
spaces and a decrease in the number of parked 
vehicles this quarter. The number of available spaces 



statewide is 6,582 at 1 10 lots. The number of 
available spaces increased due to new paving and 
additional capacity at the Route 50 and Chipman 
Road lot in Jackson County. The number of parked 
vehicles dropped from 2,747 last quarter to 2,624 this 
quarter. As confirmed by the customer surveys, gas 
prices are the biggest reason people choose to use the 
commuter lots. District and Central Office staff 
continues to work on strategies that were developed 
by a statewide team to improve the condition and 
usage at the commuter lots. This quarter our internet 
based ridesharing database was revised to look more 
like a MoDOT page. Community Relations staff 
promoted the ridesharing database through a number 
of media products and as of July 07, 2009, over 350 
users subscribed to the service. 



CD 

n 

E 



Number of Users of Commuter Parking Lots 




4th Qtr. 1 st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr. 

2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 

Fiscal Quarter 



■ Number of 
Available 
Spaces 

□ Number of 
Parked 
Vehicles 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



14C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Number of users of rest areas- 14d 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Stacy Armstrong, Roadside Management Supervisor 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of vehicles visiting 
rest areas. This information helps MoDOT better 
understand the peak days and times visitors use rest 
areas, impacting staffing decisions. MoDOT 
estimates the rest areas have more than 20 million 
visitors each year. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Rest areas at Bloomsdale and Steele on Interstate 55, 
Concordia, Wright City and Boonville on Interstate 
70, Eagle ville and Lathrop on Interstate 35, Dearborn 
and Rock Port on Interstate 29, and St. Clair and 
Joplin on Interstate 44 have permanent counters 
providing data daily. Pavement sensors send data 
from a solar-powered wireless transfer station. All 
data is from permanent counters. The counts are for 
the average seven-day period between April 1 and 
June 30. This data is updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

Permanent counters are transferring data from 1 1 
different rest areas located throughout the state rest 
area system. The Dearborn and Lathrop counters 
malfunctioned this quarter. The Rock Port and 
Eagleville sites experienced wind damage to the solar 
panels and did not provide data. 



The counting period includes the entire quarter for all 
remaining seven sites. The number of users in the 
first graph is the weekly average for each of the 
seven sites. Some of the counters were installed less 
than a year ago; therefore no comparable data is 
available for the same period last year. The weekly 
average is determined by adding the grand totals for 
each of the seven sites for the quarter, dividing by the 
number of days in the quarter (91 for this quarter) 
and multiplying by seven for the weekly total. 

The second graph provides the total number of 
visitors for the seven sites for each individual day of 
the week of the quarter. Friday is typically the 
busiest day at the rest areas. 

The permanent counters provide data for seven of the 
19 rest areas currently operational. A total of 
922,811 vehicles were counted at seven of 19 rest 
area sites. Using the average vehicles per rest area 
data from the seven sites with active counters, it is 
estimated that 2,504,772 vehicles used Missouri rest 
areas this quarter. Using a conservative estimate of 
2.5 passengers per vehicle, the rest areas had 
approximately 6,261,930 visitors for the quarter. 
Based on quarterly averages, Missouri rest areas will 
provide service to well over 25 million annual 
visitors. The fourth quarter is traditionally the second 
highest visitor count. 




July 2009 



14d 



Convenient, Clean and Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Number of Users of Rest Areas" 
Seven-day Average 




J> 



N # ^ J> J> j* s $> <fi s $ 

> *0 S «£ J" jy *P Ji> *F 



& 



*r 






J J 



* V 



& > 



V 



»& 



ry .cr rT x<> >>p Js^ O o ^ <P* J& j? 

Location 



^ 



DESIRED 
TREND 




*Concordia, Wright City, Dearborn, Bloomsdale, Boonville, St. Clair, Lathrop and Steele are two directions and 
provide counts from both sides. Rock Port, Eagleville and Joplin are one direction only. 
**Counters at Dearborn, Lathrop, Rock Port and Eagleville experienced technical difficulties during the fourth 
quarter of 2009. 



160,000 



- 120,000 
| 80,000 



40,000 - 



Number of Users of Rest Areas 
By Day of Week 
Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2009 



Monday 





: 














1 




P 






137,306 


- 


139,675 


-\ 




— B 



















Wednesday Friday 

Day 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Sunday 




1 4d (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Convenient, Clean & Safe Roadside Accommodations 



Number of truck customers that utilize rest areas- 14e 



Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Tim Jackson, Maintenance Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of trucks at rest 
areas, welcome centers and truck parking facilities. 
The number of trucks using the rest areas and the 
nearby ramps could be used to help determine how 
many spaces are needed to provide convenient 
parking facilities at each rest area. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

On a monthly basis, district maintenance personnel 
count the number of trucks parked at welcome 
centers, rest areas, on nearby ramps within 15 miles 
of the welcome centers/rest areas and at abandoned 
weigh stations that have been converted to truck 
parking facilities. The count is done between 4 and 6 
a.m., which is typically the busiest time. Data is 
collected from every rest area and truck parking 



facility to create a statewide report and updated 
quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

The second quarter of calendar year 2009 showed an 
increase of 55 in the average number of trucks using 
the rest areas and other designated truck parking 
facilities from the previous quarter. The average 
number of trucks parked in these locations decreased 
54 from the second quarter of 2008. The Conway 
welcome center opened in May, which added 156 
truck parking spaces. Constructing welcome centers 
with additional truck parking spaces and converting 
abandoned weigh stations into truck parking facilities 
continues to be a way to add parking spaces across 
the state to accommodate the need for additional 
truck parking. 



Number of Truck Customers That Utilize Rest Areas 



1,250 
1,000 

a> 

■| 750 

500 

250 







283 




300 






232 




204 




188 

n 




1 1 — 


TT 


— 




M~ 




WMfA.*m 


- 




-|- 




- 





























] Number of Trucks 
(Ramps) 



i i Number of Trucks 
(Rest Areas) 

■ Total Available 
Truck Parking 
Spaces 



2nd Qtr. 3rd Qtr. 4th Qtr. 1st Qtr. 2nd Qtr. 
2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 

Calendar Year 



July 2009 



14E 



\ 






t f 




[ i 



Best Value For Every 
Dollar Spent 

Tangible Result Driver - Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 



Providing the best value for every dollar spent means MoDOT is running its business as 
efficiently and effectively as possible. A tightly managed budget means more roads and 
bridges can be fixed. That keeps Missouri moving. This is one of MoDOT's values because 
every employee is a taxpayer too! 



its 



r 



r-^ 






l $P 





If 



^ / 



Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Ratio of lane miles per full-time equivalency- 15a 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Steve Meystrik, Special Projects Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of this measure is to track how Missouri 
ranks nationally on the ratio of lane miles per full- 
time equivalency (FTE). This measure assists 
management in making efficiency and staffing level 
comparisons to other transportation departments 
based upon the total number of lane miles within each 
state system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT receives the data for this measure from 
reports by the U.S. Census Bureau and Federal 
Highway Administration (FHWA). 

The number of state DOT employees is obtained 
annually from U.S. Census Bureau reports of state 
government employment within several broad 
classifications that include "highways." As defined 
by the U.S. Census Bureau, the "highways" 
classification includes employees of state government 
agencies whose primary function is the maintenance 



and operation of streets, roads, sidewalks, bridges, 
tunnels, toll roads, and ferries; snow and ice removal; 
street lighting; and highway and traffic engineering 
activities. The number of lane miles for each state is 
obtained from FHWA's annual Highway Statistics 
report. 

The ratio of lane miles is the number of lane miles 
each state DOT is responsible for divided by the 
number of FTEs within the "highways" functional 
classification. 

This is an annual measure updated each July. The 
most recent reports used to update this measure reflect 
data collected two years prior. 

Improvement Status: 

According to 2007 data, Missouri ranks tenth in the 
nation with a ratio of 1 1 .46 lane miles per FTE. 



Missouri's National Ranking by Number of Lane Miles Per FTE 

2007 

20 



15 



o 



r~ 


nrin io ' h 


nnnnnnn 


n 



5 ^ 



z 2 a O 



< "- > O z < 



502 



State 



15A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Number of full-time equivalencies- 15b 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Steve Meystrik, Special Projects Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the change in the number of full- 
time equivalencies (FTEs) within the department and 
compares it to the number of FTEs in the legislative 
budget. The data provides a high-level view of 
overall staffing at MoDOT in relation to budgeted 
FTEs. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This measure converts the regular hours worked or 
on paid leave of temporary and salaried employees, 
as well as overtime worked (minus any hours that are 
flexed during the workweek), to FTEs. In order to 
convert these numbers to FTEs, the total number of 
hours worked is divided by 2,080. The data is 
collected and reported each quarter of the fiscal year. 



Improvement Status: 

Since fiscal year 2007, there has been a decline in the 
number of FTEs for all three categories measured 
(salaried, temporary, and overtime), and this trend 
has continued through fiscal year 2009. The 
department has decreased salaried FTEs by 21, FTEs 
resulting from temporary employees by 12, and FTEs 
resulting from overtime by 97 compared to the end of 
fiscal year 2008. The department's total FTE count 
for fiscal year 2009 was 6,636, which is 130 FTEs 
lower than fiscal year 2008 and 311 FTEs lower than 
the number budgeted for fiscal year 2009. 



Number of MoDOT Full-Time Equivalencies 



i 



7,200 




] Overtime 



I I Temporary Employees 
I 1 Salaried Employees 
o Budgeted FTEs 






4,800 



2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 

Fiscal Year 




July 2009 



15b 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Percent of work capacity based on average hours worked- 15c 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Micki Knudsen, Human Resources Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of this measure is to track how many 
hours the average employee works on an annual basis. 
This measure can assist management in assessing 
staffing and productivity levels. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT tracks the average regular hours worked and 
average overtime hours worked by employees. The 
average regular and overtime hours worked does not 
include seasonal or wage employees. The work 
capacity measure is the percentage of regular and 
overtime hours worked out of the 2,080 hours 
available during a fiscal year. 

Within a 2,080-hour fiscal year, an employee would 
work 1,984 hours (work capacity ratio of 95.4 percent) 
if he/she worked all available hours except the 12 state 
holidays provided to State of Missouri employees. 

If another holiday has been granted by Executive Order 
of the governor, which is customary following the 
Thanksgiving holiday, then 1,976 hours would be 
worked at a ratio of 95.0 percent. The difference 
between MoDOT' s reported percent of work capacity 
and a work capacity of 95.0 percent will illustrate how 
many hours on average an employee is away from 
work due to paid or unpaid leave. 



The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes 
hours- worked to hours-paid ratios for 14 industry 
sectors. The individual ratio of the utility industry 
(87.9 percent in 2007) is displayed for comparison 
purposes due to the similarities in workforce and need 
for 24/7 operations. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT' s work capacity for fiscal year 2009 (86.2 
percent) was lower than the previous two years due to 
department efforts to manage overtime; however, 
overall work capacity remains higher compared to 
2005 and 2006 levels. The average number of regular 
hours has increased to its highest level over the last 
five years and is reflective of department efforts to 
reduce sick leave usage. The department has steadily 
decreased sick leave usage over the last five years. 
Sick leave usage for fiscal year 2009 decreased by 
25,621 hours compared to fiscal year 2008 totals. 
This reduction is the equivalent of gaining the 
production of 12 additional full-time equivalencies 
(FTEs) by better managing sick leave usage. Fiscal 
year 2009 sick leave totals are over 130,000 total 
hours (20 hours per employee) less than sick leave 
hours reported for fiscal year 2005. This reduction is 
the equivalent of gaining the production of an 
additional 60 FTEs without adding any staff. 



^v 



Percent of Work Capacity" 



<2 

o 



2,000 



1,800 



1,600 



1,400 



85.4% 86.1% 87.0% 




87.2% 86.2% 




68 


i_»j 


91 




91 


L^J 






h 




- 





2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



] Average 
Overtime Hours 
Worked 

I Average 
Regular Hours 
Worked 

Bureau of 
Labor Statistics 
- Utility Industry 



DESIRED 
TREND 




* Based on 2,080 hours of work in the fiscal year, including regular and overtime hours for salaried and permanent part-time 
employees. 



15C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Rate of employee turnover- 15d 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Kim Hickey, Employment Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the percentage of employees 
who leave MoDOT annually and compares the 
department' s turnover rate to benchmarked data. 
Voluntary turnover includes most resignations and 
retirements. Involuntary turnover includes 
dismissals. Beginning with calendar year 2007, it 
also includes retirements and voluntary resignations 
of employees who had a disciplinary history and/or a 
final performance management rating of "Needs 
Improvement" or below. Turnover rates as shown in 
this measure include voluntary and involuntary 
separations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data is collected statewide to assess overall 
employee turnover. Comparison data is collected 
from various sources annually. For 2006 and 2007 
benchmarked data, Saratoga Institute surveyed more 
than 300 organizations representing a wide variety of 
industries. The 2008 data had not yet been released 
from Saratoga at time of publication. 

Improvement Status: 

The department' s voluntary separation rate was down 
from 3.6 percent in the first half of calendar year 



2008 to 2.4 percent in the first half of calendar year 
2009. During these same periods in 2008 and 2009, 
the department's involuntary separation rate was also 
down just slightly from 1.2 percent to 1.1 percent. 
There were 49 releases in the first half of 2009, and 
an additional 24 resignations and retirements 
designated as involuntary separations. Of the 
remaining 153 voluntary separations that occurred in 
the first half of 2009, 113 were retirements and 40 
were resignations. The number of resignations by 
employees with less than one year of service 
decreased from 28 in the first half of 2008 to 13 in 
the first half of 2009. However, as a percent of total 
resignations, this represents an increase from 23.3 
percent in 2008 to 25 percent in 2009 due to the 
lower number of total resignations during this period. 
The total number of separations of employees in civil 
engineering positions decreased from 34 in the first 
half of 2008 to 1 8 in the first half of 2009. Of these 
civil engineering separations, there were 20 
resignations in the first half of 2008 and only 2 
resignations in the first half of 2009. The overall 
decrease in voluntary separations can be attributed to 
continued unstable market conditions and an increase 
in unemployment rates statewide. 



15 



10 



0) 
D 



Rate of Employee Turnover 




I MoDOT (Voluntary) 
] MoDOT (Involuntary) 
Saratoga (Voluntary) 
□ Saratoga (Involuntary) 



2006 2007 2008 YTD 2008 YTD 2009 

Calendar Year 




July 2009 



15d 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Level of job satisfaction -15e 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Paul Imhoff, Employee Development Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the level of employee 
satisfaction throughout the department at specific 
points in time. The first chart indicates the level of 
department employees' job satisfaction and changes 
in their satisfaction over time. The second chart 
shows the percentage of MoDOT employees who are 
satisfied compared to the organizations that scored 
the best in employee satisfaction using the same 
survey instrument, and to top-level organizations 
using a similar survey questionnaire. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Employee satisfaction is measured using 1 8 items 
from an annual employee survey. The vendor 
contracted to conduct the employee satisfaction 
survey in 2003 and 2005 provided "Vendor Best 
Practice" data collected from an anonymous 
company. Society for Human Resources 
Management (SHRM) best practice data was 
gathered from an SHRM report of an annual job 
satisfaction survey of 55 Fortune 500 companies. 
This is an annual measure updated in July each year, 
with the final survey report completed in October 
each year. 

Improvement Status: 

The 2009 Employee Satisfaction Survey was 
distributed on May 4, 2009, with a completion 
deadline of June 16, 2009. Optional demographic 
questions were added to the 2009 survey requesting 
"supervisor's name" and "building location." 

The results from the 2009 survey indicate that 3,792 
employees responded to the survey for a 60 percent 
return rate. That is a decrease from 64 percent in 

2008 (417 fewer surveys returned). The percentage 
of employees that were "very satisfied" increased 
from 9 percent in 2008 to 13 percent in 2009. 
Overall the percentage of employees who indicated 
they were at least "somewhat satisfied" increased to 
71 percent in 2009. 

The average rating for job satisfaction increased for 

2009 from 3.44 to 3.57 on a five-point scale. Of the 
18 items comprising the job satisfaction scale, 17 



items increased in average score, while one 
decreased. The item related to "receiving 
recognition" decreased. The two items with the 
largest increase were "rewards for a job well done" 
and "having a say in what happens at MoDOT." 

The greatest number of specific comments from the 
2009 survey tended to coincide with the lowest rated 
items. The area with the most negative comments 
revolved around pay and salary increase issues. 
Approximately 5 percent of respondents (175 
employees) made specific negative comments about 
pay or issues involving the lack of promotion 
opportunities. 




15E 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



c 


Level of Job Satisfaction 
(Average Rating) 






o 

A 




Average Score 


ill 









2003 



2005 2007 



Calendar Year 



2008 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



100 



80 



*- 60 
c 
<D 
O 

<D 

a. 40 



20 




Percent of Satisfied Employees 



0»4 



52 



59 



54 



57 



58 



H__HJ £> 



2003 2005 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



3 Somewhat 
Satisfied 

■ Very Satisfied 



O SHRMBest 
Practice 

^^Vendor Best 
Practice 






DESIRED 
TREND 



July 2009 



1 5E (2) 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Number of lost workdays per year-15f 



Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Jeff Padgett, Risk and Benefits Management Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the actual number of days that 
employees cannot work due to work-related injuries 
sustained during the reporting period. Note that the 
results do not include lost workdays for injuries that 
occurred during previous reporting periods. 
(Example: an employee that is injured on Dec. 31, 
2008 and is off during January of 2009 will not show 
up as lost time in 2009 because the incident occurred 
during the previous reporting period.) 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data is collected from Riskmaster, a claims 
administration software, and reported quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

The number of lost workdays for the first and second 
quarters of 2009 is 156 percent higher than the first 
two quarters of 2008, increasing from 85 in 2008 to 
218 lost workdays in 2009. Though not illustrated in 



the chart, the number of lost-time incidents reflected 
a 14 percent reduction from 2008 to 2009. 
Subrogation claims attribute the greatest number of 
lost workdays. Two MoDOT employees suffered serious 
motor vehicle third party incidents. Both employees 
sustained serious injuries that resulted in a significant 
number of lost workdays. Additionally, two employees 
sustained relatively serious injuries while cutting trees, 
and contributed a large number of lost workdays to the total. 

MoDOT continues to develop and implement new 
safety-related initiatives to further reduce lost workdays, 
including Safety Pays, a work simulation physical 
exam and the Fit for Duty program. Risk management 
personnel now direct all medical care for work-related injuries. 

MoDOT continues to identify and provide light-duty 
assignments for injured workers with restrictions in 
an effort to get them back to work quickly. 



Number of Lost Workdays Per Year 




i 



2004 



2005 



2006 



2007 



2008 



1 st and 

2nd 

Quarters Quarters 
2008 2009 



1 st and 

DESIRED 
2nd TREND 



Calendar Year 



e> 



15F 



Missouri Department of Transpertation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Rate and total of OSHA recordable incidents- 15g 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Jeff Padgett, Risk and Benefits Management Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of recordable 
injuries, as defined by OSHA, in total and as a rate of 
injuries per 100 workers. The calculation for 
incidence rate is the number of recordables times 
200,000 divided by the number of hours worked. The 
200,000 used in the calculation is the base for 100 
full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 
weeks per year). OSHA defines a recordable incident 
as a work-related injury or illness that results in 
death, days away from work, restricted work or 
transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond 
first aid or loss of consciousness. This measure has 
been changed to reflect this definition beginning in 
2009. Data from 2008 and prior define OSHA as two 
or more doctor visits. 



Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT reports on the measure quarterly, and 
collects the injury data from Riskmaster, a claims 
administration software. The number of hours 
worked is taken from MoDOT' s payroll data. 

Improvement Status: 

Both the number of OSHA recordables and the 
incidence rate for MoDOT have increased over the 
reporting periods noted. The incident rate increased 
by 58 percent for the first two quarters of 2009 over 
2008, rising from 3.9 to 6.18. The number of OSHA 
recordables increased by 59 percent over the same 
period, with an increase from 137 to 218. It should 
be noted that this increase is due in part to the change 
in definition of an OSHA recordable incident. 



9 

8 

7 



6 - 
5 
& 4 

3 

2 

1 






Rate of OSHA Recordable Incidents 



□■ 



3.017 



q. 



A 5.90 



24~ 



□ 



2.92 



A 5.4 



□ 



2.82 



U>9 




I MoDOT 
-Texas DOT 



A Private Industry 
Construction 



2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 lst&2nd lst&2nd 

Quarters Quarters 
2008 2009 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



(Information from Private Industry Construction was not yet available for 2008.) 



July 2009 



15G 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Total of OSHA Recordable Incidents 



600 




2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 1 st & 2nd 1 st & 2nd 

Quarters Quarters 
2008 2009 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 




1 5G (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Number of claims for general liability- 15h 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Jeff Padgett, Risk and Benefits Management Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

General liability claims arise from allegations of 
injuries/damages caused by the dangerous condition 
of MoDOT property and the injury /damage directly 
resulted from the dangerous condition. In addition, 
an employee must be negligent and create the 
dangerous condition or MoDOT must have actual or 
constructive notice of the dangerous condition in 
sufficient time prior to the injury/damage to have 
taken measures to protect the public against the 
dangerous condition. This measure tracks the 
number of general liability claims filed. 



Measurement and Data Collection: 

Risk and Benefits Management reports on the 
measure quarterly and collects the claims data from 
Riskmaster, a claims administration software. 

Improvement Status: 

The number of claims for general liability has 
declined over the reporting periods noted. 



Number of Claims for General Liability 



1500 




hh 



2005 2006 2007 2008 YTD 2008 YTD 2009 

Calendar Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



s 



July 2009 



15h 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Cost of utilities for facilities- 15i 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Doug Record, General Services Manager - Facilities 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the cost and usage of utilities for 
department facilities, excluding roadways. It 
attempts to capture the impact of energy efficient 
improvements in buildings and operations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data is collected based on utility expenditures 
and usage recorded in the statewide financial 
accounting system. The following utilities are 
included in the analysis: electricity (excluding 
roadways, lighting and signals), steam, water, sewer, 
natural gas, propane, fuel oil, other fuel and utilities. 
This is a quarterly measure with the per square foot 
chart being updated annually. 



Improvement Status: 

The total cost reported for utilities for fiscal year 
2009 was $5,880,626, an increase of 1.4 percent over 
fiscal year 2008. Electric and natural gas expenses 
decreased by $57,955.94 in fiscal year 2009 
compared to fiscal year 2008. The majority of the 
increase showed up in water, sewer and propane 
costs. Water & sewer increases were due to the 
addition of welcome centers, water leaks and billing 
issues from utility companies, which have been 
corrected. Propane increases were due mainly to 
price increases. The square foot chart indicates an 
increase of two percent. 



Cost of Utilities for Facilities 
Total Utility Cost 



c 6 
2 o 

ME 4 



£ 2 



J |_| |_| |_ I 



2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



_| DESIRED 
TREND 



s 



1.50 



Cost of Utilities for Facilities 
Utility Cost per Squa re Foot of Buildings 




DESIRED 
__| TREND 



0.00 



2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



£> 



151 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



60 



2 40 

O 



11 



20 



Total Electric Usage 
FY 2009 






2009 

Fiscal Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



£ 2 

ol 



Total Natural Gas Usage 
FY 2009 




2009 

Fiscal Year 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



July 2009 



1 51 (2) 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Fleet status- 15j 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 

Measurement Driver: Jeannie Wilson, Central Office General Services Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of units in the 
MoDOT fleet as well as their condition. The chart 
provides an overall fleet condition status based on 
actual fleet age and meter compared to maximum 
life-cycle thresholds. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Age and meter thresholds were established based on 
maximum useful life. Units are identified as either 
exceeding or not exceeding their primary life cycle 
for either age or meter. 

Reports are generated from the Fleet Management 
System to obtain information regarding equipment 
age and usage. 



Improvement Status: 

The overall fleet size has decreased from 6,063 to 
5,965 units through the fourth quarter of fiscal year 
2009. 

MoDOT' s goal is to increase the percentage of fleet 
under the replacement threshold. According to the 
established thresholds, 81 percent of the MoDOT 
fleet is under the recommended replacement criteria. 
The criteria suggests that 19 percent of the fleet 
currently meets or exceeds the threshold. MoDOT 
has made a concerted effort to maintain the fleet at 
the appropriate level to ensure service needs are met. 



7,000 
6,000 
5,000 



_g 4,000 

E 

^ 3,000 



2,000 

1,000 





Fleet Status 
(in units) 





6,222 6,182 6 63 5,965 


25% 




23% 




20% 




19% 






















^EI^^I 

















































□ Exceeds Threshold 

□ Under Threshold 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 

Excludes those 
Under Threshold 



15J 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Percent of vendor invoices paid on time- 15k 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Debbie Rickard, Controller 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the department's timeliness in 
processing vendor payments. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The check date determines if invoice payment is 
timely. Timely is defined as a check issued less than 
31 days from the date of the invoice. The 
department' s measure is benchmarked to the New 
Mexico DOT. MoDOT uses the vendor invoice date 
for determining promptness of payment; New 
Mexico utilizes a combination of vendor invoice date 
and the date received by the approving division when 
the invoice has not been promptly delivered. 



Improvement Status: 

Vendors age their receivables based on the date of 
invoice. This measure indicates there has been 
consistent improvement. The steps to further 
improve are: (1) identify specific vendors 
experiencing delayed payment and work with those 
vendors to obtain timely, accurate invoices, (2) 
determine if delayed payments are common to a 
particular division within the Central Office or a 
district, (3) identify processes contributing to the 
delayed payment, and (4) identify innovative 
solutions to receive invoices from the customer. 
Analysis tools have been developed to assist in 
identifying areas where improvements can be made. 



Percent of Vendor Invoices Paid on Time 

-^99 — — 95 ~ 




1 



■ MoDOT 



O New Mexico 



4th Qtr. 2007 2008 2009 4th Qtr. 
FY2006 FY2009 

Fiscal Year and Current Fiscal Year 
Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



July 2009 



15k 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Distribution of expenditures- 151 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Debbie Rickard, Controller 

Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of the measure is to demonstrate a 
responsible use of taxpayers' money, with the 
emphasis of spending on construction and 
maintenance of our transportation system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data collection is based on cash expenditures by 
appropriation on a quarterly basis. Construction and 
maintenance expenditures are defined as expenditures 
from the construction and maintenance 
appropriations. Other expenditures include: 
administration, multimodal, fleet, facilities, 
information systems, and other services (FFIS & 
Other), Motor Carrier and Highway Safety 
appropriations. Debt service appropriations are not 
included. 



Improvement Status: 

MoDOT's emphasis is on expenditures for routine 
maintenance of the system (maintenance 
appropriation) and rehabilitation and construction of 
the system (construction appropriation). Total 
expenditures are $204.8 million more for fiscal year 
2009 than for fiscal year 2008. Construction 
expenditures, percentage and dollars, have increased 
for the same period as a result of an increase in the 
construction program. Administration and Motor 
Carrier have remained relatively constant as a percent 
of total expenditures. FFIS decreased as a percent of 
total expenditures primarily due to the timing of FFIS 
expenditures. Highway Safety and Multimodal 
fluctuate depending on availability of federal grants. 



100 



80 - 



c 


60 


CD 




O 




X- 




<D 

Q. 


40 



20 



Distribution of Expenditure 
Construction and Maintenance 



86.9 



88.1 



88.0 



87.6 



88.0 



64.0 



68.5 



69.5 



66.8 




67.6 



□ Construction 

□ Maintenance 



DESIRED 
TREND 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 





Thousands of Dollars 




2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


Construction 


1,085,840 


1,373,699 


1,539,217 


1,373,682 


1,530,161 


Maintenance 


386,399 


391,817 


408,904 


428,461 


460,725 



15i_ 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



c 
0) 

o 

CD 



15 
12 
9 
6 
3 





Distribution of Expenditure 
Other 



13.1 



11.9 



12.0 



12.4 



12.0 



6.3 



3.1 
TO" 



5.0 



3.1 



0.3 
2005 



1.4 

~oT 

2006 



4.9 



3.2 



1.6 



5.2 



3.8 



r=s5i 



4.6 



3.7 



0.3 
2007 

Fiscal Year 



0.3 
2008 



1.2 
2009 



■ Administration 

□ FFIS& Other 

■ Multimodal 

□ Highway Safety 

■ Motor Carrier 

















Thousands of Dollars 




2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


Administration 


41,288 


43,076 


45,086 


46,808 


49,214 


Multimodal 


52,681 


61,431 


71,839 


77,265 


83,007 


FFIS & Other 


106,822 


99,418 


108,023 


106,343 


104,635 


Motor Carrier 


5,811 


6,741 


6,899 


6,930 


7,095 


Highway Safety 


17,702 


27,657 


35,730 


17,064 


26,531 




July 2009 



1 5i_ (2) 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Percent variance of state revenue projections- 15m 



Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Ben Reeser, Financial Resource Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The measure shows the precision of state revenue 
projections. Projections are used to prepare the 
budget that funds MoDOT's operations and capital 
program. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

State revenue includes three major components of 
taxes and fees paid by highway users: motor fuel 
taxes, motor vehicle and driver licensing fees, and 
motor vehicle sales and use taxes. This measure does 
not include interest earnings and miscellaneous 
revenue, which are also considered state revenues. 
The measure provides the cumulative, year-to-date 
percent variance of actual state revenue versus 



projected state revenue. Fiscal year 2009 projections 
are based on the financial forecast prepared in August 
2008. This measure is updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

The actual state revenue was less than projected 
through the fourth quarter of FY 2009. The projected 
revenue was $1,043.0 million. However, the actual 
receipts were $997.8 million, a difference of $45.2 
million and a negative variance of 4.33 percent. The 
desired trend is for the actual revenue to match 
projections with no variance. MoDOT staff adjusts 
future operating and capital budgets to account for 
these variances, if needed. 



Percent Variance of State Revenue Projections 



c 

O 

CD 
a. 






















0.22 



























2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



® 



15M 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



MoDOT national ranking in revenue per mile-15n 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Ben Reeser, Financial Resource Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure shows Missouri's national ranking in the 
amount of revenue per mile that is available to spend on 
the state highway system. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. Revenue is the total receipts 
less bonds as reported in the Federal Highway 
Administration's 2006 annual highway statistics report 
entitled "Revenues Used By States For State- 
Administered Highways." The mileage is the state 
highway agency miles as reported in the Federal 
Highway Administration's 2006 annual highway 
statistics report entitled "State Highway Agency- 
Owned Public Roads." Resource Management collects 



this information from the Federal Highway 
Administration. 

Improvement Status: 

Missouri's revenue per mile of $49,977 currently ranks 
44 th in the nation. Missouri has a very large state 
highway system, consisting of 33,681 miles, which is 
the seventh largest system in the nation. New Jersey's 
revenue per mile of $1,010,172 ranks first. However, its 
state highway system contains only 2,326 miles. 
MoDOT staff continues to communicate the need for 
additional transportation funding to the public. 
Missouri's transportation needs greatly exceed current 
available funding. 



MoDOT National Ranking in Revenue Per Mile 

2006 



1,050 
900 
750 



■o 
D 8 

= 3 
O O 

a £ 



600 
450 
300 
150 



44' 



o Innnnnn 



nnnnnnnnnn 









^ O < 2 O Q 
2 Z > Z 2 <*> 



z£z2£--20>-i££o<2^za2:<-ooz5^y 



3|C 



— — Q _i < < 

* I I ut O 2 



State 



15n 



April 2009 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Number of excess properties conveyed- 15o 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Kelly Lucas, Right of Way Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of this measure is to track the number of 
excess parcels conveyed from MHTC ownership. In 
order to fulfill its stewardship role of asset 
management while observing practical business 
decisions, the department is proactively identifying 
and disposing of property that is no longer needed for 
the maintenance of the transportation system, will not 
be used for future expansion projects and is no longer 
needed for its operations. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data collection for this measure is reported on a 
quarterly basis from the Realty Asset Inventory 
system. 



Improvement Status: 

MoDOT conveyed 228 parcels in fiscal year 2009, 
which is more than double the 112 excess parcels 
conveyed in fiscal year 2008. During the fourth 
quarter of fiscal year 2009, 72 excess parcels were 
conveyed as compared to 40 during the fourth quarter 
of fiscal year 2008. 

To bridge the gap in resources, external survey and 
appraisal services have been budgeted. In addition, 
collaboration with Design staff resulted in the 
streamlining of environmental clearances. 

There are currently 220 individuals who receive 
electronic notification of new property listings. 



Number of Excess Properties Conveyed 



250 



200 








2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



z> 



150 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Best Value for Every Dollar Spent 



Gross revenue generated from excess properties sold-15p 

Result Driver: Roberta Broeker, Chief Financial Officer 
Measurement Driver: Kelly Lucas, Right of Way Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of this measure is to track the amount of 
revenue generated from the sale of excess property. 
In order to fulfill its stewardship role of asset 
management while observing practical business 
decisions, the department is proactively identifying 
and disposing of property that is no longer needed for 
the maintenance of the transportation system, will not 
be used for future expansion projects and is no longer 
needed for its operations. Funds received from the 
sale of excess properties are used to improve the 
condition of the state highway system. The districts 
use these funds to apply toward the costs associated 
with various maintenance activities and construction 
projects. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This data represents the gross revenue from all 
properties sold. Incidental costs incurred in the 
conveyance of excess properties are not considered in 



this measure. Data collection for this measure is 
reported on a quarterly basis from the Realty Asset 
Inventory system. 

Improvement Status: 

Revenue through the end of the fourth quarter of 
FY09 from excess sales totals $4,271,783, resulting 
in an increase of $2,398,062 from the previous 
quarter. 

Of the 21 properties listed with the consultants under 
contract to provide real estate marketing and 
consulting services, five properties sold in the fourth 
quarter for a total of $2,188,000. In addition, sales 
contracts have been executed on three properties and 
offers have been received on two properties for a 
combined total of $2,187,500. 



O £ 2 



Gross Revenue Generated from Excess 
Properties Sold 







2005 



2006 



2007 

Fiscal Year 



2008 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Zi 



July 2009 



15P 





^ 



's 



A 



' ■ '" 



*1 ^ 



+**! *+ 



r 



mi 



U -<■*£ 5- 



Attractive Roadsides 

Tangible Result Driver - Don Hillis, Director of System Management 



An enjoyable transportation experience includes more than a smooth surface - motor- 
ists expect to see roadsides free of litter and debris, well-managed and maintained grass 
and other vegetation and other attractive enhancements. MoDOT works to meet and 
exceed expectations for roadsides. Beautiful roadsides are visible proof that MoDOT 
takes pride in everything it does. 




t . 






**> 



Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Attractive Roadsides 



Percent of roadsides that meet customers' expectations- 16a 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver: Mike Shea, Maintenance Liaison Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure 

This measure tracks the percent of MoDOT's roadway 
system that meets customers' expectations for 
attractiveness. 

Measurement and Data Collection 

A list of roadside quality indicators was developed and 
approved based on an industry-wide literature review. 
The activities selected for this measure were used to 
develop a quality assurance checklist for roadside 
attractiveness. Data collection for this measure is 
based on a yearly inspection of a number of randomly 
selected sample sites located throughout the state. The 
random sites are inspected yearly for each activity. 

This is an annual measure updated each January. 



Improvement Status: 

Over the past five reporting years, the five roadside 
activities referenced below have shown varying trend 
lines. MoDOT shifts resources to improve in all 
categories. In an effort to conserve fuel and meet 
department guidelines on vegetation management, 
there has been a shift in resources over the past two 
years from mowing to maintaining the other roadside 
attributes. Over the last year, litter debris and slope 
erosion improved. MoDOT staff will continue to shift 
resources to improve efforts in weed control. 



Percent of Roadsides That Meet Customers 1 
Expectations 



100 



80 

c 

% 60 
O 

C 

CD 40 

O 

k. 

0) 



20 



"Tl9ll 



85 



59 



69 



78 



88 



91 



90 



91 E 92 




94 



53 



66 



60 



Mowing Litter/Debris Brush/Trees Slope Erosion Weed Control 

Roadside Attributes 




DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



16A 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Attractive Roadsides 



Number of miles in Adopt -A-Highway program- 16b 

Result Driver: Don Hillis, Director of System Management 
Measurement Driver : Stacy Armstrong, Roadside Management Supervisor 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks public involvement in taking 
care of Missouri's roadsides through the Adopt- A- 
Highway program. Missouri has one of the largest 
and oldest Adopt- A-Highway programs in the nation. 
The volunteers learn about litter awareness and some 
of the challenges MoDOT faces, while allowing 
maintenance crews to do more critical activities. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Adopters agree to pick up litter on a designated 
roadway section for a minimum of four times a year 
and report their results. Adopters commit to a three- 
year agreement when they join the program. Urban 
adoptions are for a minimum of one-half mile and 
rural adoptions are for at least two miles. Miles are 
measured by the centerline, however, volunteers are 
responsible for both sides of the roadway. Adopter- 
related information is maintained in an Adopt- A- 
Highway database using the Transportation 



Management System. This is an annual measure 
updated quarterly. 

Improvement Status: 

In recent years, the number of miles adopted has 
increased. Recent growth may be due to increased 
public awareness through No MOre Trash!, a litter- 
prevention campaign coordinated by MoDOT and the 
Department of Conservation. There are 236 new 
adoptions in 2009. The program will continue to be 
promoted at Earth Day, state and county fairs, and 
other events. Sponsor- A-Highway, a complementary 
program to Adopt- A-Highway, was launched on 
September 17, 2008. Currently 24 miles are 
sponsored for litter cleanup in the Kansas City and 
St. Louis areas. New Adopt- A-Highway safety vests 
were introduced in January 2009. A Web-based 
Adopt- A-Highway database was implemented in 
April 2009. 



6,000 
5,000 



Number of Miles in Adopt- A- Highway Program 



</> 4,000 





I 1 I 






2005 



2006 2007 

Calendar Year 



2008 



2009 YTD 



DESIRED 
TREND 





Wi^ 



July 2009 



HKSeSBfit 



16b 



4 



V 





1 



I 




a.,** ***" 




Advocate for 
Transportation Issues 

Tangible Result Driver - Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 



Transportation issues can be extremely diverse and complex. An efficient transportation 
system requires leadership and, most importantly, a champion to ensure the resources 
support projects that will help the department fulfill its responsibilities to the taxpayers. 
MoDOT will be an advocate for transportation. 



I 





ifi ^ £ a 



Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



Percent of minorities and females employed- 1 7a 

Result Driver: Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 

Measurement Driver: David Williams, Acting Equal Opportunity and Diversity Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This quarterly measure tracks minority and female 
employment in MoDOT' s workforce and compares it 
with availability data from the Missouri 2000 Census 
report. Efficient use of people resources provides 
opportunities for the department to leverage 
transportation resources with available human 
capital. By placing the right people in the right place, 
the department can better serve its customers and 
help fulfill its responsibilities to taxpayers. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT' s Affirmative Action software database and 
Missouri 2000 Census Report are used to collect data. 
Private sector, departments of transportation, 
Missouri state agencies, and Missouri 2000 Census 
Data were researched to determine a benchmark for 
this measurement. Due to the significant variations 
for some of these entities (such as pay incentives, 
number of employees, geographic locations), it was 



determined Missouri 2000 Census Data, based on 
jobs used by the department, would be the benchmark 
for this measurement. 

Improvement Status: 

The total number of minority employees increased by 
1 1.60 percent (543 to 606) from fiscal year 2008 to 
fiscal year 2009. Overall minority employment 
increased to 9.43 percent compared to 8.64 percent. 
The total number of female employees decreased by 
0.44 percent (1,359 to 1,353) from fiscal year 2008 to 
fiscal year 2009. In fiscal year 2009 female 
employment decreased to 21.16 percent compared to 
21.53 percent in fiscal year 2008. Steps taken to 
improve this measurement include: conducting 
application workshops and interview training with 
potential applicants, ongoing interaction with new 
employees, and implementation of a CDL training 
program to potential applicants. 




17a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



15 



12 



C 9 

<D 

O 

I 6 



Percent of Minorities Employed 



♦ 




12.46 






9.43 
















■ 








8.02 I 

1 

■ 


1 









2005 2006 2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



■Missouri 
Availability J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



25 



Percent of Females Employed 




2005 2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 



'Missouri j 
Availability J 



DESIRED 
TREND 



July 2009 



1 7a (2) 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



Separation rates for females and minorities- 1 7b 

Result Driver: Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 

Measurement Driver: David Williams, Acting Equal Opportunity and Diversity Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

The purpose of this measure is to track female and 
minority separation rates compared to the overall 
MoDOT separation rate. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data is collected quarterly through SAM II 
Advantage HR, ReportNet and Peopleclick 
AAPlanner reports. These separations include both 
voluntary and involuntary separations from the 
department. 



Improvement Status: 

The overall number of separations for MoDOT 
decreased by 22 percent (567 to 442) from FY 2008 



compared to YTD 2009. Of this number, female 
separations decreased by 24.7 percent (121 to 91) and 
minority separations decreased by 4.6 percent (86 to 
82). As a result of these decreases, the MoDOT 
separation rate decreased by 2.0 percent, while the 
female separation rate decreased by 2.1 percent and 
the minority separation rate by 1.8 percent. 

Steps taken to improve this measurement include: 
utilizing alternate work schedules to balance work and 
personal life, counseling females and minorities through 
the "Work Life Center" and conducting district training 
to address EEO and retention issues. 



Separation Rates for Females and Minorities 



30.0 



25.0 



20.0 



c 
CD 
O 

CD 
Q- 




□ Females 
D Minorities 
■ MoDOT 



DESIRED 
TREND 



2006 



2007 2008 

Fiscal Year 



2009 




17b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



Transportation-related legislation filed and passed by the General 
Assembly- 17c 

Result Driver: Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 

Measurement Driver: Lisa LeMaster, Senior Governmental Relations Specialist 



Purpose of Measure: 

This measure tracks significant transportation-related 
legislation filed and passed by the General Assembly. 
Significant transportation-related legislation is 
legislation that is either favorable or unfavorable with 
regard to providing transportation resources, 
supporting transportation projects, creating efficiency 
within the department, or promoting roadway safety. 
This measure also tracks the department's progress 
on its own legislative agenda. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

During session, data is obtained by reviewing both 
the Senate and House Web sites for legislation in the 
transportation subject categories. Each bill is then 
reviewed to determine whether it contains an 
initiative that is favorable or unfavorable to 
transportation. The total favorable initiatives filed 
are compared to the total favorable initiatives that 
pass and the total unfavorable initiatives filed are 
compared to the total unfavorable initiatives that 
pass. The number of favorable and unfavorable 
transportation-related initiatives filed and number 
passed are noted on the first chart as an annual 
measure. 

Also, each fall potential legislative proposals are 
submitted to the Missouri Highways and 
Transportation Commission for review and approval. 
The second chart tracks each approved legislative 
proposal through the legislative process. 

Improvement Status: 

MoDOT' s desired goal is to see all MHTC proposed 
legislation pass. For the 2009 legislative session, the 
MHTC proposed three separate legislative initiatives, 
"Primary Safety Belt," "Incident Management," and 
a "Missouri Waterways Resolution." Two of the 
three proposals, "Incident Management" and 
"Missouri Waterways Resolution" passed. The 
"Primary Safety Belt" proposal passed out of the 
House Transportation Committee but was laid over in 
the House Rules Committee. 



MoDOT' s desired trend as an advocate for 
transportation is also to see a larger number of 
favorable transportation initiatives pass when 
compared to unfavorable initiatives that pass. During 
the 2009 session, of the total 1,975 bills filed, 11 
percent were transportation-related which equates to 
220 transportation bills. Of the 220 transportation 
bills, there were 34 significant transportation 
initiatives contained in those bills. Of the 34 
significant initiatives, 19 were favorable and 15 were 
unfavorable. Of the 19 favorable initiatives, 13 
passed and six failed. Of the 15 unfavorable 
initiatives, one passed and 14 failed. The 
unfavorable initiative that passed was the repeal of 
the all-rider motorcycle helmet law. However, this 
unfavorable initiative was vetoed. All other 
initiatives included in transportation bills were 
neutral with regard to their impacts on transportation. 




July 2009 



17c 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



Number of transportation-related legislation filed and 
passed by the General Assembly 




2005 2006 2007 2008 

Legislative Session 



2009 



□ Total Favorable 

□ Favorable- Passed 

□ Total Unfavorable 

□ Unfavorable- Passed 



DESIRED 
TREND 



e> 



Progress on MoDOT Legislative Initiatives 



n 
£ 

<D 
</> 
to 

< 

D 

<D 

C 
0) 





c 
o 

jg HCS HB 665 Primary Safety Belt 






o 
o 

CM 



D 
D 
D) 
0) 



tn 



CCS SS SCS HB 683 Incident 
Management 



^ SCR 5 Waterways Resolution 



ZCZI 

1 1 1 1 



Progress 



■ 1st Chamber 
DCmte Hearing 

■ Cmte Vote 

■ Pass 1st Chamber 

■ 2nd Chamber 
DCmte Hearing 

■ Cmte Vote 

■ Pass 2nd Chamber 

□ Conference 
DTAFP 

□ Governor Signed 



DESIRED 
TREND 



1 7C (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Advocate for Transportation issues 



Number of federal earmarked projects on the 
state's transportation system- 1 7d 

Result Driver: Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 

Measurement Driver: Jay Wunderlich, Governmental Relations Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

Missouri's support for increased transportation 
funding on the national level can be measured by 
MoDOT' s ability to demonstrate transportation needs 
to members of Congress. The number of federal 
earmarked projects on the state's transportation 
system is representative of the department's success, 
as an advocate to address the state's transportation 
needs. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. The data represents 
the total number of federal earmarked projects on 
the state highway system that are identified as 
needs by MoDOT and by Missouri's Congressional 
Delegation. The number of federal earmarked 
projects on the state's transportation system 
represents the department's success in working with 
Missouri's Congressional delegation. The identified 
needs for this measure are projects that are included 
in the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) 
or projects ready to be added to the STIP as soon as 
funding becomes available. 

Improvement Status: 

The chart shows Missouri was successful in receiving 
federal earmarks on projects that are classified as 
needs. These earmarks were received in the Safe, 
Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation 
Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) in 
2005, and the FY' 06, FY '08 and FY '09 annual 
transportation appropriations acts. Congress did not 
pass an FY '07 bill. 

MoDOT staff provides a listing of transportation 
needs to all of Missouri's Congressional offices in 
anticipation of possible funding opportunities. In 
SAFETEA-LU, 84 earmarked projects were 
identified. In FY '06, through the appropriations 
process, 34 earmarked projects received dedicated 
funding. In FY '08, 34 earmarked projects received 
dedicated revenues. In FY '09, 40 projects received 
an appropriation. 

Even though MoDOT supplies the congressional 
members with a list of transportation needs, there is 
always the opportunity for the individual 



congressman to earmark additional projects on the 
state system they deem appropriate. 

Missouri continues to be successful in receiving 
transportation earmarks. 

Interaction with Congress is very important in 
receiving dedicated funds for projects that are 
identified needs. Therefore, MoDOT continues to 
meet with Missouri's Congregational offices on a 
regular basis to provide information on transportation 
issues, urging them to support programs, and projects 
that address Missouri's transportation needs. In 
calendar year 2009, MoDOT met with all of 
Missouri's Congressional offices and provided them 
with details on highway, transit and aviation projects 
for federal FY 2010 appropriations. MoDOT staff has 
also begun the process to keep the Missouri 
congressional delegation informed of issues related to 
the economic stimulus package, the next 
appropriation bill and the department' s position on 
the next multi-year transportation authorization act. 

MoDOT continues to strive for Missouri's share of 
any federal funding opportunity. The department 
will continue to communicate directly with 
Missouri's Congressional offices to increase the 
number of earmarked projects that are identified 
needs on the state transportation system 



July 2009 



17d 



Advocate for Transportation Issues 



to 

O 
<D 

O 



<D 

£ 

3 



100 
80 
60 
40 
20 




Number of Federal Earmarked Projects on the State's 
Transportation System 

84 



8 



34 



--fl— n 



34 40 



15 



26 






& <& & 



c$> cp> cy cp> 

Federal Fiscal Year 






D MoDOT Requests 

■ Additional Congressional 
Requests 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 




1 7d (2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Advocate for transportation Issues 



Percent of customers who view MoDOT as 
Missouri's transportation expert- 1 7e 

Result Driver: Pete Rahn, Director of MoDOT 

Measurement Driver: Jay Wunderlich, Governmental Relations Director 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks whether our customers feel the 
department is a leader and expert in transportation 
issues. The measure shows the department how 
effectively MoDOT conveys its expertise to the 
traveling public. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure updated each July. Data is 
collected from interviews with over 3,500 randomly 
selected adult Missourians each May. Each year, 
MoDOT surveys public opinion to collect 
information that will tell the department whether or 
not the public views MoDOT as the primary 
transportation expert in Missouri. 



Improvement Status: 

The current information shows that 91 percent of 
respondents indicate MoDOT is the transportation 
expert they rely upon. This represents an increase of 
6 percent since last surveyed in 2008. Through a 
questioning approach identical to the 2008 survey, 
the 2009 numbers increased in the strongly agree 
responses thus reflecting a higher percent of 
individuals that disagreed with this statement than 
previously (8 percent in 2009 vs. 15 percent in the 
last year). MoDOT must continue to work on 
improving partnerships with citizens, legislators and 
special interest groups promoting MoDOT as a 
transportation expert. Ways to accomplish this 
include increasing awareness of MoDOT' s 
responsibilities to and services for the traveling 
public. 



Percent of Customers Who View MoDOT as 
Missouri's Transportation Expert 

100 
80 
60 
40 
20 




c 


O 

0) 



82 
33 


82 ,-£ 
33 4 


7 85 
3 43 


91 
54 




+i 


hi 


HI 



□ Strongly Agree 
■ Somewhat Agree 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



July 2009 



17E 




^v 





'"MJfc.-., ... 



— — — ^^ 




V,<\^ 




5 



Accurate, Timely, 
understandable and 
Proactive Transportation 
information (outbound) 

Tangible Result Driver - Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 



Accurate, consistent and timely information is critical to accomplishing MoDOT's mission. 
By providing this information to its customers, MoDOT becomes the first and best source 
for transportation information in Missouri. Openness and honesty build trust with our 
customers. 



K*Mpfl| 



***- 



?*?•&*, 




Tracker 

measures of departmental performance 



Accurate, timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Number of public appearances- 18a 



Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks and encourages regular, personal 
contact with MoDOT customers. A public 
appearance is defined as any single, public event 
attended by one or more MoDOT representatives to 
provide transportation related information. Examples 
include speeches, presentations, conferences, 
exhibits, fairs and ribbon cuttings. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is a quarterly measure. District Community 
Relations managers collect appearance information 
from their administrators on a quarterly basis and 
send it to Central Office Community Relations where 
it is combined with data from divisions and business 
offices to create a statewide report. The numbers 



change from quarter to quarter because certain events 
and other public appearance opportunities are 
seasonal, such as school visits and fairs. 

Improvement Status: 

This quarter' s number of public appearances is 
another record. MoDOT employees documented 906 
public appearances during the second quarter of 2009 
and conservatively reached at least 61,000 people. 
The public appearances ran the gamut from safety 
presentations to school talks. Outreach efforts 
regarding recovery act projects and the Safe & Sound 
Bridge Improvement Program also helped keep the 
numbers strong. 



Number of Public Appearances 



1050 




□ Central Office 
■ District 



2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qt 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



18a 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Accurate, timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Percent of customers who feel MoDOT provides timely, accurate and 
understandable information- 18b 



Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Sally Oxenhandler, Community Relations Manager 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks whether customers feel MoDOT 
provides timely, accurate and understandable 
information they need and use. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This is an annual measure. Data is collected from 
telephone interviews with more than 3,500 randomly 
selected adult Missourians each May. As a 
comparison, the Tennessee Department of 
Transportation reported in September 2006 (the latest 
data available) that 49 percent of residents surveyed 
said they were satisfied or very satisfied with the 
agency's efforts to keep them informed about 
transportation-related issues. 



Improvement Status: 

An outstanding 92 percent of Missourians agree that 
MoDOT provides understandable information, while 
90 percent feel the department provides timely and 
accurate information. These figures represent a 4-6 
percent increase over last year and a 15-18 percent 
jump since 2005. MoDOT' s efforts to be open and 
transparent can be seen in these results, as can a 
variety of outreach activities ranging from the 
Traveler Information Map and electronic message 
boards to YouTube videos and virtual public 
meetings. Efforts to communicate major initiatives 
such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act, the Safe & Sound Bridge Improvement Program, 
the New 1-64, kcICON and A Conversation for 
Moving Missouri Forward also contributed to the 
positive responses. 



Percent of Customers Who Feel MoDOT 
Provides Timely Information 



An 


85 8 
74 II 


6 90 
2 47 


S 60 

o 

O 40 

Q_ 

20 
n 


18 23 31 A 

QBE 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



□ Strongly Agree 

■ Agree 

♦ Tennessee DOT 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



July 2009 



18b 



Accurate, timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



c 

(D 
O 

O 

Q. 



r 



Percent of Customers Who Feel MoDOT 
Provides Accurate Information 




Strongly 
Agree 

Agree 

Tennessee 
DOT 



DESIRED 
TREND 



2005 



2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



& 



Percent of Customers Who Feel MoDOT Provides 
Understandable Information 



100 




] Strongly 
Agree 

I Agree 

-Tennessee 
DOT 



2005 2006 2007 2008 

Calendar Year 



2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



1 8b(2) 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Number of contacts initicfed by MoDOT to media- 18c 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Kristi Jamison, Community Relations Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks how well MoDOT staff is 
"reaching out" to reporters to tell them about the 
good work MoDOT does. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

All contacts (news releases, e-mail, tweets, phone 
and correspondence) initiated by MoDOT staff are 
included. Central Office Community Relations 
collects quarterly results, including submissions from 
districts. 



Improvement Status: 

Media contacts increased to another new all-time 
high of 153,785 in the second quarter of 2009. That 
is an increase of 45,771 media contacts between the 
first and second quarters of 2009. The 
implementation of several MoDOT Twitter accounts 
had a significant impact on the number of media 
contacts this quarter. Increased efforts to report day- 
to-day roadwork and progress on Safe & Sound and 
Recovery Act projects also helped boost the number 
of contacts to the media during this period. 



Number of Contacts Initiated by MoDOT to Media 

160,000 



140,000 




2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qt 2008 IstQtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



July 2009 



18c 



Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Percent of MoDOT information that meets the media's 
expectations- 18d 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Kristi Jamison, Community Relations Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks how MoDOT is meeting the 
media's needs by providing appropriate information. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

MoDOT sends out an annual survey asking statewide 
media if MoDOT' s outreach efforts meet their 
expectations. They are asked to rate their level of 
satisfaction in the areas of press releases, public 
meetings and events. Each area is further rated in 
news worthiness, timeliness, and how understandable 
it is. 



Improvement Status: 

The annual statewide media survey is conducted each 
June. There were 105 media outlets that participated 
in the 2009 survey, a 78 percent increase from last 
year. To increase responses, the survey was shortened 
and distributed by District staff to the media outlets 
in their respective areas. MoDOT is generally 
meeting the media's expectations. There were 
positive increases in all but two categories. Press 
releases were rated slightly less understandable, due 
in part to distribution formats that have now been 
addressed. Plus, several weekly papers again stated 
they aren't getting information in time. In the ratings, 
the timeliness of public meetings also decreased 
slightly. 



Percent of MoDOT Information That 

Meets the Media's Expectations 
(Press Releases) 




1 98.3 r 






■ 2007 
□ 2008 

■ 2009 



Newsworthy 



Timely 
Attributes 



Understandable 



DESIRED 
TREND 



ft 



18d 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



100 



80 



C 60 

<D 

O 

I 40 



20 



Percent of MoDOT Information That 

Meets the Media's Expectations 
(Public Meetings) 



Newsworthy 



Timely 

Attributes 




■ 2007 
□ 2008 

■ 2009 



100 



Percent of MoDOT Information That 

Meets the Media's Expectations 

(Events) 



Newsworthy 



Timely 

Attributes 



Understandable 




■ 2007 
□ 2008 

■ 2009 



July 2009 



1 8d (2) 



Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Percent of positive newspaper editorials- 18e 



Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Kristi Jamison, Community Relations Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks how MoDOT is perceived by the 
media, and by extension the public. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Using a newspaper clips database, MoDOT staff 
reviews statewide newspaper editorials and 
determines whether they're positive or negative 
toward MoDOT and/or the issues it advocates. Only 
editorials written by newspaper staff are included; 
guest editorials and letters to the editor are not. 
Results are charted quarterly. 



Improvement Status: 

There were 37 editorials regarding MoDOT or state 
transportation issues in the second quarter of 2009, 
up from 31 in the first quarter. Of those editorials, 92 
percent were positive. A call to amend the safety belt 
law to primary enforcement and a call to veto the bill 
repealing the helmet law received the strongest 
support with a total of 20 editorials. Other topics 
included a mix of funding, high-speed rail and 
transportation improvements. Three editorials were 
negative, including two in favor of the helmet law 
repeal and one in opposition to the use of stimulus 
funds to expand Route 141 in St. Louis. 



Percent of Positive 
Newspaper Editorials 



100 



80 



c 60 

0) 

O 

O 40 



20 







2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qt 2008 1 st Qtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



18E 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Accurate, Timely, Understandable and Proactive 
transportation information (outbound) 



Number of repeat visitors to MoDOT's Web site-18f 

Result Driver: Shane Peck, Community Relations Director 
Measurement Driver: Matt Hiebert, Community Relations Coordinator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the number of customers who 
have used MoDOT's Web site on a repeat basis. The 
data helps demonstrate whether the public views the 
site as a valuable information resource. If they are 
returning to the site for multiple visits, they probably 
view it as a worthwhile use of their time online. 



Measurement and Data Collection: 

Data is gathered using Web Trends software. Web 
Trends measures site activity and produces reports in 
graphic and tabular formats. 

Improvement Status: 

Repeat visitors to the Web site rose by more than 
60,000 over the same quarter last year. Weather 
patterns were similar, although this year we had more 
flooding in May while last year, more flooding 
occurred in June. 



0) 

n 

E 



240,000 

200,000 

160,000 

120,000 

80,000 

40,000 





Number of Repeat Visitors to MoDOT's 
Web Site by Month 




112,828 



82,160 



126,427 




83,750 



April 



May 
Calendar Month 



June 



■ 2008 
□ 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 





E 

3 



480,000 
400,000 
320,000 
240,000 
160,000 
80,000 




Number of Repeat Visitors to MoDOT's 
Web Site by Quarter 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■^^^^^^^^H 


I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


413,395 | 


^■■H 


I 


IHHHI^H 


^5S 


319,487 | 


| 


323,005 


■ 
I 
■ 


■ 
■ 


261,416 | 




|H 


183,409 | 


|H 


^H 


l^^^HH 


I 


!■ 


^| 


^| 


^| 




I 



2nd Qtr. 2008 3rd Qtr. 2008 4th Qtr. 2008 1st Qtr. 2009 2nd Qtr. 2009 

Calendar Quarter 




DESIRED 
TREND 



Q 



July 2009 



18F 



(This page is intentionally left blank for duplexing purposes) 



*• 



REC0VERY.GOV 



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pScT)VEfir« 

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Fast Projects That Are of 
Great Value 

Tangible Results Driver - Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 



Missouri was the first state in the nation to begin construction on high- 
way projects funded by the Recovery Act. The minute President Obama 
signed the economic recovery bill, MoDOT went to work to replace one 
of the state's oldest and most rickety bridges, the Osage River bridge 
near Tuscumbia. Construction on three other recovery act projects also 
started immediately. Additional road, bridge, air, rail, transit, pedestrian 
and bicycle projects will be under way in the coming weeks and months. 
All along, MoDOT said we'd be ready to go with critical transportation 
projects, and we delivered. We are committed to putting your tax dollars 
to use as quickly as possible to create jobs, improve roads and save lives! 



V 






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Wi 



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m^^ measi 



RACKER 



EASURES OF DEPARTMENTAL PERFORMANCE 



19 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Recovery Act projects and dollars awarded to date- 19a 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Jay Bestgen, Assistant State Design Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the progress MoDOT is making 
in awarding Recovery Act projects. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Projects are awarded by the Missouri Highways 
Transportation Commission based on formalized 
MoDOT bid reviews shortly after letting dates. The 
award dates for each project are also reported and 
posted on the Federal Highway Administration form 
1585, which is the Monthly Recipient Status Report 
for Recovery Act projects. The data for this measure 
is collected by the Design Division and will be 
updated quarterly. All current MoDOT reports for 
Recovery Act projects can be found on MoDOT' s 
Ready To Go Web site. 



Improvement Status: 

As of June 30, 2009, MoDOT has awarded 103 
Recovery Act projects for $208,494,120. The 
remaining Recovery Act projects are scheduled for 
letting in each month from June 2009 thru February 
2010. 




$525 Million 143 Projects 




$500 Million m 150 

$450 Million 140 

130 

$400 Million 12ft 




$350 Million 


110 




$300 Million 

$250 Million 


100 

90 

80 


$200 Million 


70 


$150 Million 

1 $100 Million 


60 

50 

40 


1 $50 Million 


I 30 


1 Total amount 
f Awarded: 
^^^ $208.49 Million 


1 Total Projects 
1 Awarded 103 




As of June 30, 2009 



July 2009 



19a 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of Recovery Act project dollars obligated to date- 19b 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Jay Bestgen, Assistant State Design Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the progress MoDOT is making 
in obligating Recovery Act project dollars within the 
time periods required by the legislation. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data for this measure is collected by the Design 
Division and will be updated quarterly. All current 
MoDOT reports for Recovery Act projects can be 
found on MoDOT' s Ready To Go Web site. 



Improvement Status: 

MoDOT is required to obligate 50 percent of the 
MoDOT-administered Recovery Act funds, 
excluding sub-allocated funds, by June 30, 2009. As 
of June 30, 2009, slightly more than $321 million 
dollars have been obligated towards the 50 percent 
goal of $223 million. States that fail to meet this 
initial obligation requirement will have the non- 
obligated portion of their funds withdrawn and 
redistributed to the states that met the requirement in 
a timely manner. All apportioned Recovery Act funds 
must be obligated by March 2, 2010. 



Percent of Recovery Act project 
dollars obligated to date 




Obligated 
D Unobligated 



DESIRED TREND: 

50% by 6/30/09 
100% by 3/2/10 



^Obligated dollars as of June 30, 2009. 




19b 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Recovery Act project dollars awarded versus budget -19c 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 
Measurement Driver: Jay Bestgen, Assistant State Design Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure determines how close MoDOT budgets 
Recovery Act projects as compared to the awarded 
amount. The measure also tracks the savings MoDOT 
is achieving by expediting projects using Recovery 
Act funds. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

Budgeted project costs include right of way, utilities, 
construction and other miscellaneous costs. The data 
for this measure is collected by the Design Division 
and will be updated quarterly and represents a 
cumulative total. All current MoDOT reports for 
Recovery Act projects can be found on MoDOT' s 
Ready To Go Web site. 



Improvement Status: 

As of June 30, 2009, MoDOT has awarded 103 
Recovery Act projects for $208,494,120. The bids 
came in 8.3 percent, or $18,818,880, below our 
program budgets for these projects. The remaining 
Recovery Act projects are scheduled each month 
from June 2009 thru February 2010. Bids have been 
coming in lower primarily due to contractor 
competition in the market and the strategic 
arrangement and timing of projects in the letting 
schedule. 



Budgeted Project Cost versus 
Awarded Recovery Act Project Cost 



240 



200 



2 S 

ME 160 

~ 120 



80 











208.5 














90.9 

[ 1 





D Budgeted 
□ Awarded 



IstQtr. 2009 YTD 2009 

Calendar Year 



19C 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Recovery Act direct jobs created -1 9d 

Result Driver: Dave Nichols, Director of Program Delivery 

Measurement Driver: Travis Koestner, Assistant State Construction & Materials Engineer 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure determines how MoDOT Recovery Act 
projects directly create jobs statewide. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

This listing is for direct jobs only and does not 
include the number of indirect and induced jobs 
created by manufacturing and delivery of materials 
for projects or the additional jobs created by workers 
contributing to local economies. These numbers 
come from contractor employment reports received 
by MoDOT for those projects that are active (i.e. 
measurable construction activity). 



The data for this measure is collected by the 
Construction & Materials Division and will be 
updated quarterly. All current MoDOT reports for 
Recovery Act projects can be found on MoDOT' s 
Ready To Go Web site. 

Improvement Status: 

The current tally as of June 30, 2009 for direct jobs 
from active Recovery Act transportation projects is 
699 with 33,200 hours worked at a payroll of over 
$1.2 million. 



Direct Jobs Created by Recovery Act Projects 
(reported by month) 



800 




March 2009 April 2009 May 2009 

Month 



June 2009 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 



19d 



Missouri Department of Transportation 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Hours Worked and Payroll Dollars 
for Recovery Act Projects 




1,500 



1,200 



i i Hours worked 

O Payroll dollars 

•< 

V) 



900 ^-o 

Si 

D 

600 >*c 



300 



March 2009 April 2009 May 2009 June 2009 

Month 



DESIRED 
TREND 



& 




July 2009 



1 9d (2) 



Fast Projects That Are of Great Value 



Percent of Recovery Act Multimodal project dollars 
obligated to date-19e 

Result Driver: Brian Weiler, Director of Multimodal Operations 
Measurement Driver: Joe Pestka, Aviation Administrator 



Purpose of the Measure: 

This measure tracks the progress MoDOT is 
making in obligating Recovery Act project 
dollars for each mode. 

Measurement and Data Collection: 

The data for this measure is collected by the 
Multimodal Operations and will be updated 
quarterly. All current MoDOT reports for 
Recovery Act projects can be found on 
MoDOT' s Ready To Go Web site. 



Improvement Status: 

Each multimodal unit has different processes and 
guidelines regarding available Recovery Act funds 
and grants. As of June 30, 2009, the Aviation Unit 
has already obligated all available funds to date. 
Transit had obligated all but $4,698 million of the 
funds available and Port had obligated $95,443. 
Complete grant applications are still pending for 
Port and Rail. As of June 30, 2009, $21.2 million 
dollars have been obligated for multimodal 
projects. This is approximately 67% (excluding 
rail) of the total amount of Recovery Act funds for 
multimodal projects that MoDOT is expected to 
receive. 



^Obligated dollars as of June 30, 2009. 



Percent of Multimodal Recovery Act Project Dollars 

Obligated to Date 



100% 
80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 
0% 



lllh 


4.4 
.095 


NA 



□ Unobligated 
■ Obligated 



Aviation Transit Port 

Dollars In Millions 



Rail 



19E 



Missouri Department of Transportation